Business

The major in Business is designed to help students understand the many functions involved in operating a successful organization. Business is a wide-ranging field that involves the overseeing and running of one aspect of an organization such as manufacturing, marketing, sales, purchasing, finance, personnel, training, administrative services, electronic data processing, property management, transportation, or the legal services department. Also, service industries, including business, social, and health services organizations hire business majors. Employees at this level are the top executives and general managers.

 

 

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Related Career Titles for Business

Management Trainee

Supervisor

Project Manager

Human Resources Manager

Restaurant/Food Service Manager

Manager of Information Systems

Operations Manager

Manufacturing Manager

Director of Marketing

Sales Manager

Purchasing Manager

Financial Manager

Personnel Manager

Director of Training and Development

Lawyer

Transportation Manager

Account Executive

Media Planner

CEO

Research Analyst

Branch Manager

 Job Analyst

Promotions Manager

Telecommunications Manger

Executive Director

Hospital Administrator

Entertainment Agent

Public Utilities Manager

Government Services Administrator

Construction Supervisor

Recruiter

Compensation Manager

Engineering Manager

College or University Professor

High School Teacher

Stock Broker

Floor Supervisor

Banker

Financial Analyst

Real Estate Broker

Quality Control Auditor

 

 

 

Industries That Hire Business Majors

Communication Services

Telecommunication Companies

Computer and Electronic Products Manufacturers

Computer Systems Design/Computer

Consulting Services

Scientific Research & Development Services

Colleges and Universities

High Schools

Electrical Equipment, Appliance, & Component Manufacturing

Engineering Services

Financial Services

Retail

Federal Government

State and Local Government

Healthcare & Social Assistance Services

Hospitals

Transportation Services

Transportation Equipment

Utilities

Wood Products

Insurance Carriers & Related Activities

Medical Equipment & Supplies Manufacturing

Aerospace Product and Parts Manufacturing

Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing, & Hunting Services

Arts, Entertainment, & Recreation Services

Commercial Banking

Restaurant and Hotel Services

Investment Banking

Building, Developing, & General Contracting Services

Chemicals Companies

Accommodation & Food Services

Accounting, Tax Preparation, Bookkeeping, & Payroll Services

Advertising & Related Services

Petroleum & Coal Products Manufacturing

Pharmaceuticals Companies

Printing & Related Support Activities

Publishing Companies

Whole Sale Trade

Real Estate

Textile Mills

 

Web Sites for Business Majors

Resources in the Career Resource Center

BOOKS

  • Job Opportunities in Engineering and Technology ’94
  • Job Opportunities in Business ’94
  • Career Information Center: Administration, Business, and Office
  • Career Information Center: Engineering, Science, and Technology
  • Career Information Center: Employment Trends and Master Index
  • Green At Work
  • Job Opportunities in Business ’95
  • Job Opportunities in Engineering and Technology ’95
  • Job Opportunities in The Environment ’95
  • Job Opportunities in Health Care ’95
  • The Complete Guide for Occupational Exploration
  • The Princeton Review Guide to Your Career 1997
  • The O*Net Dictionary of Occupational Titles

FOLDERS

  • All Majors
  • Business

How to Find the Right Job

Finding the job you want takes many steps and involves many decisions.  This checklist is designed to help you along he way and guide you to the appropriate sources.  Be sure to discuss your progress with your career advisor.

Knowing What You Want

Choose your ideal work environment-large corporation, small business, government agency, etc.

 Choose your ideal location-urban, suburban, or rural.

 List your three most useful job skills and know which is your strongest.

 Know whether you want to work with people, data, or things.  

 Know if you want to work with others or work alone.

 List your favorite leisure time activities. 

 Know what kind of reward is most important to you in a job-money, security, creative authority, etc.

 List some of the main career areas which might interest you.

 Know whether you enjoy new projects or prefer following a regular routine.


Researching Career Options

Develop a list of career possibilities to research.

Visit the Career Resource Center to earn about various careers.  The O*NET is a valuable resource.

Consider whether your desired career requires an advanced degree.

Keep up with current trends in your field through trade publications and news/business magazines and newspapers.

 Identify employers interested in interviewing someone with your academic background and experience; create a list of three or more employers in the field you are considering.

Make at least three professional contacts through friends, relatives, or professors to learn more about your field of interest.

Meet with faculty and alumni who work or how have worked in your field to talk about available jobs and the outlook for your field.

Getting Experience

Narrow down the career options you are considering through course work and personal research.

Participate in the Co-op Program or an internship in your chosen field to learn of the daily requirements of the careers you are considering.  Such assignments sometimes lead to permanent job offers following graduation.

Become an active member in one or more professional associations.  (Consult the Encyclopedia of Associations Associations for organizations in your field.)

Volunteer for a community or charitable organization to gain further work experiences that can be included on a resume.

Creating a Resume

Form a clear job objective.

Know how your skills and experience support your objective.

Use action verbs to highlight your accomplishments.

Limit your resume to one page and make sure it is free of misspelled words or grammatical errors.

Create your resume on a work processing program and have it professionally duplicated on neutral-colored paper.

Compose a separate cover letter to accompany each resume and address the letter to a specific person.

Preparing for the Interview

Arrange informational interviews with employees from companies with which you might want to interview.

Thoroughly research each employer with whom you have an interview-be familiar with product lines, services, growth, etc.

Practice your interviewing technique with friends to help prepare for the actual interview.

Using the information you have gathered, formulate questions to ask the employer during the interview.

Arrive on time in professional business attire.

Collect the needed information to write a thank you letter after each interview.

Fine Arts

    A Bachelor of Fine Arts degree helps students to develop visionary talents and provides a foundation for advancement into a visual communication profession in a wide variety of fields. Visual artists generally fall into one of two broad categories: designers or fine artists.  Designers put their artistic skills to use in the service of commercial clients such as corporations, retail stores, advertising, design, or publishing firms.  Fine artists create art to satisfy their need for self-expression, and may display their work in galleries, museums, and homes.  Often, they specialize in one or more forms of art such as painting, sculpting, ceramics, printmaking, or photography.

 The following list contains a representative sample of job titles an Art major could consider.  Some of these jobs also require education beyond a bachelors' degree. 

*The BFA degree is perfect for pursuit of the MFA degree which would be needed for teaching at a higher level and would provide more career opportunities.

*Fine Arts is also excellent training for pursuing architecture at the graduate level.

Related Career Titles

Artist

Advertising Artist

Fashion Artist/Designer

Mural Artist

Antiques Dealer

Cartoonist

Gallery Owner

Art Administrator

Ceramic Artist

Photographer

Art Buyer

Curator

Public Relations (museum, art gallery)

Futurist

Photojournalist

Display Artist

Stained Glass Artist

Conservator

Art Therapist

Art Teacher

Art Conservator

Colorist

Potter

Art Consultant

Greeting Card Artist

Art Critic

Art Dealer

Courtroom Artist

Art Director

Sculptor

Art Exhibition Coordinator

Website Designer

Set Designer/Illustrator

Artist's Agent

Textile Designer

Magazine Designer/Illustrator

Audio Visual Artist/Designer

Medical Illustrator

Billboard Artist

Exhibit Designer

Gallery Curator

 

Related Web Sites:

Art Association of Jackson Hole

College Art Association (CAA)

 

Functional Resume

The Functional Resume is best suited for an individual who is a recent graduate or new to the workforce. An individual who has a varied work history with no clear connection between the different positions held would also benefit from using the Functional Resume. It is also well suited for the individual whose job titles do not reflect the level of skills used or for the individual who is making a career change.

The Functional Resume can be thought of as a way to make sense of an individual’s work history by matching skills and accomplishments. It demonstrates the skills and abilities that you have by using past accomplishments in different positions. Headings that should be included in a Functional Resume are as follows:

Professional Profile-Describes professional history in a summarized statement.   If new to the job market, an objective statement describing career goals can be used.

Functions/Career Highlights-Emphasizes specific skills and descriptions of the functions performed that demonstrate those skills. For example, if an individual has Management Skills, this can be conveyed to the employer by stating "Supervised and advised salaried sales representatives, increasing profits by 30%-40%." A typical Functional Resume lists about four functions/career highlights.

 Experience-Lists the names of the companies, the title that the individual held, the dates that the individual held the position, and the location of the company. A Functional Resume does not contain the job descriptions. All positions held should be listed in chronological order.

Education-Lists all educational institutions attended, degrees earned, majors, GPA, awards earned, and activities in which an individual participated.

Example of a Functional Resume

Mary Jones

17 West River Drive

Somerville, NJ 08876

Phone: 908.555.5555

Email: Jonesmary@netlink.net

 

Professional Profile

 Three years of experience in the field of product planning and research. Developed innovative programs to increase product distribution. Familiar with current trends within the industry. Interacts well with a wide variety of people.

 Career Highlights

 Management

Supervised graphic designers in the creation of promotional campaigns.

Oversaw the development of product displays at branch locations.

Conducted team meetings and maintained cooperative liaison between

management and staff personnel.

Promotion

Identified customer interests

Designed attractive displays

Lead promotional campaigns

 Research

Designed customer questionnaires

Drafted plan for analysis of data

Prepared and presented final reports

Planning and Control

Organized a holiday toy show in New York City

Designed layout for all new toys by age and area of interest

Implemented daily reports to locate problem areas in a timely manner

Experience

1997-1999                        Promotional Manager

                                           Rockland Toys, New York, NY

1996-1997                        Assistant Manager

                                           KB Toy Store, Bridgewater, NJ

 Education                      Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ

                                          B.A., Marketing, May 1996

                                          GPA 3.75

GEOSCIENCE ENGINEERING

Students who graduate from the Geoscience program are capable of solving a wide spectrum of problems related to engineering, geology and the environment. Most civil engineering projects involve a thorough analysis of site geology to arrive at satisfactory design solutions. In recent years, the importance of geologic factors in design has intensified, as projects require a high level of environmental protection and restoration. Solving problems of this nature is complex, and requires considerable interaction between the fields of civil engineering and geoscience. Students can find employment as a geoscience engineer or work in the allied fields of civil engineering, environmental engineering, and geology.

 

 

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Related Career Titles for Geoscience Engineering

Atmospheric Scientist

Civil Engineer

College or University Professor

Computer Programmer

Curator

Database Analyst

Earth Scientist

Editor

Engineer

Environmental Engineer

Environmental Geoscientist

Environmental Specialist

Geochemist

Geologist

Geophysicist

Geoscience Engineer

Geo-Software Engineer

Group Head

High School Teacher

Hydrogeologist

Laboratory Manager

Marine Geologist

Meteorologist

Mining Specialist

Oceanographer

Paleontologist

Petroleum Geologist

Petrologist

Project Manager

Researcher

Sales Manager

Sedimentologist

Structural Geologist

Technical Writer

 

 

 

Industries That Hire Geocience Engineering Majors

Colleges and Universities

Publishing Companies

Petroleum Companies

Mining

Building and Construction Companies

Computer Firms

Research Institutes

National Science Foundation

Environmental Protection Agency

Consulting Firms

Museums

Energy Services

Agriculture

Forest Services

Military Services

NASA

Oceanic Services

Mapping

Environmental/Sanitation Services

Aerospace Product and Parts Companies

Chemical Companies

Engineering Services

Scientific Research & Development Services

Transportation Equipment

Utilities

Federal Government

State Government

Waste Management & Remediation Services

 

 

 

Web Sites for Geoscience Engineering Majors

 

Agiweb: Careers in Geoscience

 

Earthworks

 

The Geological Society of America

 

Geologic Resources

 

 

Resources in the Career Resource Center

 

BOOKS

 

  • Job Choices for Science, Engineering, and Technology
  • Newsweek Careers 2000
  • Career Advancement and Survival for Engineers
  • Careers in Science and Engineering
  • Jobs You Can Live With
  • Career Information Center: Agribusiness, Environment, and Natural Resources
  • Career Information Center: Public and Community Service
  • Career Information Center: Employment Trends and Master Index
  • The New Complete Guide to Environmental Careers
  • Green At Work
  • IEEE Marketing for Engineers
  • IEEE Writing for Career Growth
  • IEEE Presentations That Work
  • IEEE Building Internal Team Partnerships
  • IEEE Teaching on TV and Video
  • IEEE Starting a High Tech Company
  • IEEE High Tech Creativity
  • IEEE Working in a Global Environment
  • Krupin’s Toll Free Environmental Directory
  • The Complete Guide for Occupational Exploration
  • The O*Net Dictionary of Occupational Titles
  • College Majors and Careers
  • Job Opportunities in Engineering and Computer Science
  • Great Jobs for Engineering Majors

VIDEO

 

  • The Sloan Career Cornerstone Series Careers for Geoscientists

FOLDERS

 

  • All Majors
  • Geoscience Engineering

Goal Setting

Goal Setting is Necessary Before the Job Search 

Finding an answer to the question, "What do I really want in a career?" is one of the hardest parts of making a successful transition from college to career. Most college seniors are uninformed about career possibilities and because the topic is usually complex and, anxiety-provoking, it is left undressed.

Research Is Key

As you interview with employers, all your communication, both written and verbal, needs to focus first on understanding and then clearly articulating how your qualities can benefit the employer. As you get more involved in your job search, your goals will become refined because "career knowledge" increases.

Even if you've always known your general career path, you will now need to get "employer and job specific" to make the maximum impact during your job search.

One stumbling block is trying to draw too close a connection between your major and future jobs. Computer science majors may work as systems designers, but so may math, chemistry, and liberal arts majors. There are a number of factors beyond the college major that determine your first job.

Job Functions and Other Considerations

One of the more confusing aspects of understanding employers as part of goal setting is determining the relationship between job title, job function, work environment, and industry. People often mistakenly use these terms interchangeably.

Job title refers to the actual position name used by the employing organization to label a specific job, i.e., systems engineer, tax accountant, manufacturing trainee.

Job functions describe the activities or tasks the person in the job does on a day-to-day basis. For example, a tax accountant prepares financial records, balances company ledgers, and examines cost accounting procedures at client companies.

Work environment refers to the type of organization and culture in which the work takes place. In the example being used, a tax accountant could perform the previous functions in a large public accounting firm, a small privately owned agency, a large or small company, a multi-department organization or a small, growing firm.

Industry is a term describing a series of related products or services that make up a portion of the overall economy. Different industries include electronics, financial services, petroleum, and manufacturing. It is important to understand that a person can often perform the same work, have the same job title and the same work environment in different industries.

Formulating a Career Goal

Putting all the pieces of a first job or career goal together generally requires assistance. The accompanying Goal Setting Worksheet will get you started, and do not hesitate to seek assistance from the Career Services staff.

Download Goal Setting Worksheet

Job Search Information & Handouts

A plan makes your job search easier, less frustrating, and more successful. The Career Resource Center has guides to help you with the different phases of searching for a job.

Five Steps to Success

Etiquette

Goal Setting*

Job Search Techniques

What is Networking?*

Resume Writing

Job Search Correspondence (Letters)

How to E-Mail a Resume to an Employer

Interviewing

Checklist For a Successful Work Experience

*Material taken with permission from CASS Recruitment Media's Division of Career Development Services Placement Manual.

HUMAN COMPUTER INTERACTION

 

HCI (human-computer interaction) is the study of how people interact with computers and to what extent computers are or are not developed for successful interaction with human beings. HCI is a subfield within computer science concerned with the design, evaluation, and implementation of interactive computing systems for human use and with the study of major phenomena surrounding them.

 

 

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Related Career Titles for Human Computer Interaction Majors

Advertising

Air Traffic Systems

Business Analyst

Collaborative Designer

College and University Professor

Computer Application Programmer

Customer Service Representative

Database Designer

Dispatcher

E-Commerce

Engineer

Graphic Designer

Human Factors Engineer

Human Resources

Information Architect

Industrial Designer

Instructional Designer

Manager of Information Systems

Marketing Analyst

Network Analyst

Physical Therapist

Product Designer

Programmer

Research and Development

Sales

Software Designer

Software Engineer

Systems/Programming Engineer

Technical Writer

Telemedicine

UI Designer

User Experience Tester

Usability Analyst

Web-based Interface Design

Web Master

 

 

Industries That Hire Human Computer Interaction Majors

Advertising

Banks

Colleges and Universities

Communication Services

Computer and Electronic Products Companies

Computer Systems Design Companies

Computer Consulting

Education Services

Engineering Services

Federal Government

Financial Services

Healthcare

Insurance Companies

 Legal Services

Local and State Government

Management Consulting Services

Marketing

Media Services

Multimedia Services

Non-Profit Organizations

Production Companies

Sales

Scientific Research & Development Services

Software Companies

Transportation Services

Wireless Companies

 

 

 

Web Sites For Human Computer Interaction Majors

 

HCI Resource Network

 

Human Computer Intelligence Interaction

 

SIGCHI

 

Internet Technical Group

 

Usability Professional's Association

 

 

 

Resources in the Career Resource Center

 

BOOKS

 

  • Job Choices for Science, Engineering, and Technology Students
  • Newsweek Careers 2000
  • VGM’s Handbook of Scientific & Technical Careers
  • Career Advancement and Survival for Engineers
  • The Career Connection II
  • Careers in Science and Engineering
  • Career Information Center: Engineering, Science, and Technology
  • Career Information Center: Manufacturing
  • Career Information Center: Employment Trends and Master Index
  • IEEE Marketing for Engineers
  • IEEE Writing for Career Growth
  • IEEE Presentations that Work
  • IEEE Building Internal Team Partnerships
  • IEEE Teaching on TV and Video
  • IEEE Starting a High Tech Company
  • IEEE High Tech Creativity
  • IEEE Working in a Global Environment
  • Environmental Jobs for Scientists and Engineers
  • The Complete Guide for Occupational Exploration
  • The O*Net Dictionary of Occupational Titles
  • Job Opportunities in Engineering and Computer Science
  • Job Opportunities in Business

FOLDERS

 

  • All Majors
  • Human Computer Interaction

HISTORY

The degree in history is for students interested in preparing for further graduate study in history, and or for students who are current or prospective secondary school teachers of history and social studies. Graduates of the program go on to careers in teaching, business, law, government, administration, and other fields related to history.

 

 

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Related Career Titles for History

Anthropologist

Archeologist

Archivist

Biographer

College and University Professor

Community Relations Director

Congressional Aide

Consultant

Consumer Advocate

Counselor

Criminologist

Demographer

Economist

Editor

FBI / CIA Agent

Foreign News Correspondent

Foreign Service Officer

Genealogist

Government Official

Historian

Historic Preservation Specialist

Historic Site Tour Guide

Historical Society Staff Member

Insurance Agent

Intelligence Analyst

International Relations Specialist

Journalist

Lawyer

Lecturer

Librarian

Lobbyist

Market Research Analyst

Media Consultant

Museum Curator

Museum Technicians

Park Ranger

Peace Corps / Vista Worker

Political Scientist

Psychologist

Public Relations Specialist

Research Assistant

Sociologist

Social Studies Teacher

Specialist Writer / Author

Stock Broker

Technical Writer

Travel Agent

Urban Administrator

Urban Planner

 

 

 

Industries That Hire History Majors

Advertising

Management Consulting

Communications and Broadcasting

Bureau of the Census

Federal Bureau of Investigation

Department of State

Education Services

Financial Services

Museums

Legal Services

Local and State Government

Publishing

Peace Corps

Social Service Agencies

Political Campaigns

Political Parties

Media

Museums and Archives

Travel and Tour Services

Consulting Services

Corrections & Court Systems

Health and Human Services

Transportation Services

Community Development Agencies

Libraries

Parks & Recreation Facilities

Police & Fire Protection

High Schools

State and Local Governments

Research Foundations

Colleges and Universities

Transportation 

 

 

 

Web Sites for History Majors

 

The American Historical Association

 

Organization of American Historians

 

SHOT: Society for the History of Technology

 

 

Resources in the Career Resource Center

 

BOOKS

 

  • Job Choices for Business and Liberal Arts Students
  • Jobs You Can Live With
  • Career Information Center: Engineering, Science, and Technology
  • Career Information Center: Hospitality and Recreation
  • Career Information Center: Employment Trends and Master Index
  • The Complete Guide for Occupational Exploration
  • The O*Net Dictionary of Occupational Titles
  • Great Jobs for History Majors
  • College Majors and Careers

FOLDERS

 

  • All Majors
  • History

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING

The Industrial Engineering program prepares students to apply problem-solving techniques in almost every kind of organization imaginable. Industrial Engineering graduates work in banks, hospitals/health facilities, government organizations, manufacturing, and service industries. A few examples of typical assignments for our graduates are optimizing the allocation of resources, developing new productivity techniques, establishing standards for different types of activities, designing and installing manufacturing systems, designing materials handling systems, and designing efficient operating techniques.

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Related Career Titles for Industrial Engineering

Buyer

College or University Professor

Computer Programmer

Contractor

Design Engineer

Design/Construction Engineer

Engineering Manager

Financial Analyst

Hardware Engineer

High School Teacher

Human Factors Analyst

Human Resources Manager

Industrial Engineer

Maintenance Manager

Maintenance Supervisor

Management Trainee

Manufacturing Engineer

Market Researcher

MIS Manager

Occupational Safety and Health Engineer

Planner

Process Engineer

Production Engineer

Production Supervisor

Project Manager

Public Accountant

Quality Control Engineer

Research and Development Specialist

Safety Engineer

Safety Inspector

Software Engineer

System Analyst

Technical Trainer

Testing Engineer

 

Industries That Hire Industrial Engineering Majors

Aerospace Product and Parts Manufacturers

Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing, & Hunting Organizations

Building, Developing, & General Contracting Services

Chemical Companies

Communication Services

Computer and Electronic Products Manufacturers

Computer Systems Design/Computer Consulting Consulting Services

Electrical Equipment, Appliance, & Component Manufacturing

Employment Services

Engineering Services

Financial Services

Federal Government

State and Local Government

Investigation & Security Services

Medical Equipment & Supplies Manufacturers

Metals Manufacturers

 Mining Services

Museums, Historical Sites, & Similar Institutions

Nonmetallic Mineral Products

Paper Manufacturing

Petroleum & Coal Products

Pharmaceutical Companies

Plastics & Rubber Products

Printing & Related Support Activities

Personal Care Products

Textile Mills

Transportation Services

Transportation Equipment

Utilities

Wood Products

Wholesale Trade

 

Web Sites for Industrial Engineering Majors

Engineering Central: Jobs for Industrial and Manufacturing Engineers

IndustrialEngineer.com

Institute of Industrial Engineers

Human Factors and Ergonomics Society (HFES)

Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences- (INFORMS)

Resources in the Career Resource Center

BOOKS

  • Job Choices for Science, Engineering, and Technology Students
  • VGM’s Handbook of Scientific and Technical Careers
  • Career Advancement and Survival for Engineers
  • Careers In Science and Engineering
  • Career Information Center: Engineering, Science, and Technology
  • Career Information Center: Employment Trends and Master Index
  • Green At Work
  • IEEE Marketing for Engineers
  • IEEE Writing for Career Growth
  • IEEE Presentations That Work
  • IEEE Building Internal Team Partnerships
  • IEEE Teaching on TV and Video
  • IEEE Starting a High Tech Company
  • IEEE High Tech Creativity
  • IEEE Working in a Global Environment
  • Environmental Jobs for Scientists and Engineers
  • The Complete Guide for Occupational Exploration
  • The O*Net Dictionary of Occupational Titles
  • College Majors and Careers
  • Job Opportunities in Engineering and Computer Science
  • Great Jobs for Engineering Majors

FOLDERS

  • All Majors
  • Industrial Engineering

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