Electrical Engineering

Electrical engineering is a diversified profession concerned with the design and operation of the electrical devices and systems required by our technological society. These can range from the smallest microdevice to the largest power generator. Integrated circuits, computing, biomedical instrumentation, energy conversion, power generation and distribution, control systems, microprocessors and communications are just some of the fields open to the electrical engineer.

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Related Career Titles for Electrical Engineering

Automation/Robotics Engineer

Biomedical Technician

College/University Professor

Communications Engineer

Computer Programmer

Computer Systems Analyst

Consultant

Controls Engineer

Customer Service Representative

Electrical Engineer

Fiber Optics Engineer

Field Engineer

Hardware Engineer

High School Teacher

Manager of Information Systems

Management Trainee

Manufacturing/Industrial Engineer

Mechanical Engineer

Military Official

National Security Officer

Network Specialist

Power Systems Engineer

Process Engineer

Product Manager

Production Engineer

Quality Assurance Engineer

Research and Development Specialist

Salesperson

Software Engineer

Systems/Programming Engineer

Technical Writer

Testing Engineer 

 

Industries That Hire Electrical Engineering Majors

Computer Companies

Telecommunication Companies

Aerospace Product Companies

Building, Developing, & General Contractors

Chemical Companies

Consulting Services

Transportation Equipment

Utilities

Waste Management & Remediation Services

Wholesale Trade Organizations

Petroleum & Coal Product Manufacturers

Scientific Research & Development Services

Electrical Equipment, Appliance, & Component Manufacturing Companies

Engineering Companies

Medical Equipment Manufacturers

Colleges and Universities

High Schools

Banks

Accounting Firms

Public Relations Firms

Hospitals

Graphic Arts Companies

Environmental Organizations

Television Studios

Insurance Companies

Petroleum Industry

Federal Government

US Department of Defense

Investigation & Security Services

 

Web Sites For Electrical Engineering Majors

IEEE

EngineeringJobs.com

TechJobs

Graduating Engineer and Computer Careers Online

ElectricalEngineer.com

Resources in the Career Resource Center

BOOKS

  • Job Choices for Science, Engineering, and Technology Students
  • Newsweek Careers 2000
  • VGM’S Handbook of Scientific and Technical Careers
  • Career Advancement and Survival for Engineers
  • Careers in Science and Engineering
  • Career Information Center: Engineering, Science, and Technology
  • Career Information Center: Manufacturing
  • Career Information Center: Employment Trends and Master Index
  • IEEE Marketing for Engineers
  • IEEE Writing for Career Growth
  • IEEE Presentations that Work
  • IEEE Building Internal Team Partnerships
  • IEEE Teaching On TV and Video
  • IEEE Starting a High Tech Company
  • IEEE High Tech Creativity
  • IEEE Working in a Global Environment
  • Environmental Jobs for Scientists and Engineers
  • The Complete Guide for Occupational Exploration
  • The O*Net Dictionary of Occupational Titles
  • Job Opportunities in Engineering and Computer Science
  • Great Jobs for Engineering Majors
  • College Majors and Careers

VIDEO

  • The Sloan Career Cornerstone Series: Careers for Electrical Engineers and Computer Scientists

FOLDERS

  • All Majors
  • Electrical Engineering

Engineering Technology: Electical and Computer Engineering Technology

An Electrical and Computer Engineering Technology degree prepares the student for a wide variety of careers, such as system designer, system verification engineer, networks and telecommunications specialist, hardware or software engineer, system analyst, clinical engineer, and biomedical technician. Students may concentrate their studies in computer systems, communications, or biomedical electronics. However, graduates do not necessarily take jobs within their concentrations.

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Related Career Titles for Electrical And Computer Engineering Technology

Biomedical Electrician

Biomedical Technician

College and University Professor

Communications Analyst

Computer Programmer

Computer Systems Analyst

Construction/Design Engineer

Customer Service Representative

Environmental Engineer

Field Engineer

Hardware Engineer

High School Teacher

Manager of Information Systems

Management Trainee

Manufacturing Engineer

Network Administrator

Non-technical Salesperson

Power Systems Engineer

Quality Control Engineer

Software Engineer

System Designer

Systems Engineer

System Verification Engineer

Testing Engineer

Technical Writer

Telecommunications Specialist

Industries That Hire Electrical and Computer Engineering Technology Majors

Electrical Equipment, Appliance, & Component Manufacturing Companies

Computer Companies

Engineering Services

Telecommunication Companies

Graphic Arts Companies

Environmental Organizations

Television Studios

Insurance Companies

Aerospace Product Companies

Building, Developing, & General Contractors

Chemical Companies

Transportation Equipment Companies

Utilities

Waste Management & Remediation Services

High Schools

Banks/Accounting Firms

Public Relations Firms

Hospitals

Federal Government

US Department of Defense

Scientific Research & Development Services

Investigation & Security Services

Medical Equipment Manufacturers

Colleges and Universities

Petroleum Industry

Consulting Services 

 

Web Sites For Electrical and Computer Engineering Technology Majors

The Technology Interface

NICET Online: National Institute for Certification in Engineering Technologies

ElectricalEngineer

IEEE

Resources in the Career Resource Center

BOOKS

  • Job Choices for Science, Engineering, and Technology Students
  • Newsweek Careers 2000
  • Graduate Programs in Engineering and Applied Sciences
  • VGM’s Handbook of Scientific & Technical Careers
  • Career Advancement and Survival for Engineers
  • The Career Connection II
  • Careers in Science and Engineering
  • Career Information Center: Engineering, Science, and Technology
  • Career Information Center: Manufacturing
  • Career Information Center: Employment Trends and Master Index
  • IEEE Marketing for Engineers
  • IEEE Writing for Career Growth
  • IEEE Presentations that Work
  • IEEE Building Internal Team Partnerships
  • IEEE Teaching on TV and Video
  • IEEE Starting a High Tech Company
  • IEEE High Tech Creativity
  • IEEE Working in a Global Environment
  • Environmental Jobs for Scientists and Engineers
  • The Complete Guide for Occupational Exploration
  • The O*Net Dictionary of Occupational Titles
  • Job Opportunities in Engineering and Computer Science
  • Great Jobs for Engineering Majors
  • College Majors and Careers

FOLDERS

  • All Majors
  • Engineering Technology

Using Employer Literature for Successful Interviews

Simply being informed about an employer does not guarantee a successful interview unless you can effectively use the information. Information about the employer's products, financial data, opportunities, or how they impact society is only helpful if you know how to tactfully "weave" your new knowledge into the interview. This is no easy task and simply spouting facts or statistics --or prefacing a question with a lot of memorized information--is not the answer.

Most employers have literature and/or a web site describing their organization and opportunities. Major employers provide annual reports. It is important for you to secure information on an employer before you interview.

Using Information in Answering Questions

Most of the questions you will be asked will not relate directly to the information in the literature. There are ways, however, to show how your skills and background meet the employer's needs using the information you gain. Some examples:

1 . Question:
'Why do you think you might want to work for this company? "

Response:
"As I understand the job, there's plenty of opportunity to be involved in both the planning of marketing strategies and the actual selling. Besides using my communications skills and knowledge of chemicals in direct selling, I believe I'm creative when it comes to marketing.

2. Question:

"I see you're involved with the Spanish Club. What were some of the benefits from that experience?"

Response:

 "As secretary, I was responsible for organizing a display on Spanish literature for the Cultural Fair we sponsored. Most of my correspondence with publishing houses was done in Spanish and I feel this experience added a whole new business angle to my fluency. I would feel very confident communicating with your international customers.

3.  Question:

"What courses did you like best?

Response:

"I enjoyed my Sociology of Learning class the most. During one in a series of field trips, I observed a rural daycare center. That confirmed for me that this type of setting is where I want to begin my career.

 

Using Information in Asking Questions

Next, it will be your turn to ask questions of the interviewer. It is to your advantage to ask questions which require the interviewer to expand on information you have learned from the employer's literature. Following are some excerpts from employer literature, paired with questions that could be formulated from the information given.

  • After about 12-15 months from the time you began, if you've demonstrated your ability, you'll be ready for promotion to Merchandising Manager. Your increased responsibility will include a larger sales volume and a number of sales associates reporting to you."

1. Questions Formulated

"Could you talk about some methods by which trainees are evaluated?"

"What kinds of communication channels are there between the trainees and the supervisors?

"What would you say is the major quality or accomplishment which distinguishes those who are promoted from those who are not?"

---------------------------------------------------

  • "Today's large store manager usually has gained experience in district or regional staff work"

2. Question Formulate

"In viewing some of the background that your large store managers have, regional staff work is mentioned. Could you describe some of the staff work responsibilities?"

---------------------------------------------------

  • "But that's still not the point. From the start, ABC Company has had a goal--a vision, if you will--of being the leader in communications. That's why we are into education,  publishing, and software, among other things."

3. Question Formulated

"When the company looks to the future, it appears from the brochure that education, publishing, and software are some key areas. What are some of the product areas now that might be less important in the future-that the company may be cutting back?"

 

---------------------------------------------------

Examples of Poor Questions

1. Tell me about your training program." (Too general, shows you didn't do your homework.)

2. "At what salary level would I be if I progress to Step 3 in my second year with the company?" (Shows your concern is money as opposed to responsibility.)

3. "Could you explain your fringe benefits package?" (Standard, boring question-need to be more specific and ask about various aspects.)

Criteria for Examining Employers

Asking and answering interview questions in a prepared and professional manner is the key to successful interviewing. Use the following list of EMPLOYER INFORMATION CRITERIA (Adapted from "Recruiting Literature: Is It Adequate? " ECPO) as a guideline for what you need to find out about an employer BEFORE you choose to interview.

  • Details and Functional Descriptions of Positions
  • Training Program Outline
  • Hiring Process (timing, evaluation criteria)
  • Benefits
  • Requisite Qualifications for Entry-Level Positions
  • Typical Career Paths
  • Introduction to Employer Products/ Services
  • Starting Salaries / Compensation Forms
  • Employee Review / Evaluation Process
  • Travel / Relocation Expectations
  • General Hiring Patterns
  • Regional Lifestyle / Cost of Living
  • Organizational Chart/ Structure

 


 

How to Fax and e-Mail a Resume to an Employer

When faxing a resume or sending it via e-mail as an attachment, your cover letter should be brief.  Revising and editing your cover letter are key to you objective: to obtain an interview.   To be successful, give time and thought to each type of cover letter and relate it specifically to each job for which you apply.  Here is a sample fax cover letter:

Fax To: Ms. Jill Smith

 

 Phone: 973.123.4567

 

 Company: ABC Industries

 

 Fax: 973.987.6543

 

 From: Your Name

 

 Phone: Your Phone

 

 Pages: 2

 

 Fax: Fax# You're Using

 

 Dear. Ms. Smith:

 

      In response to the job posting on NJIT's CDS On-Line.  I am enclosing my resume for your consideration for the database analyst position.

 

    My resume details my qualifications.   I have excellent communication and problem-solving skills, am proficient in Access and Oracle and have the ability to function well in stressful situations.  I am confident that my internship experience at XYZ Company will make me successful at ABC Industries.  Please contact me at my home number at (973) 222-2222 or via e-mail to schedule an interview.  Thank you for your consideration of my application.

 

It is o.k. but not necessary to mail a copy to the company. Many people mail it as an additional assurance that the resume will be reviewed.

 

E-Mail Cover Letters

 

Many on-line services are not listing only an e-mail address for the resume forwarding.  When you send your resume, a brief cover e-mail message is required.  Be sure you keep a copy of what you send for your records.  The salutation line should be formal, just like a letter, e.g., Dear Mr. or Ms. Smith:

 

In the body of the message, brevity is necessary.  Business e-mails must be brief, otherwise, you will not be viewed as a person familiar with workplace protocol.  Similar to a regular cover letter, you want to grab the attention and interest of the reader right away.   Therefore, by outlining your skills as they relate to the job description/requirements, you illustrate clearly that you know what the employer seeks to fill that position.

 

TO: abc123@HOTINDUSTRY.org

 

cc: yourself, if your program does not automatically do this!

 

 SUBJ: Application for Network Administrator

 

 Dear Human Resources Director:

 

I am pleased to attach my resume for consideration for the above position, as advertised on Monsterboard.com. on May 2, 2000.  Please review it and note my excellent qualifications for this position.  In my current position I have gained excellent communication skills and my coursework has given me the background to join your firm and be productive from day one.

 

I am highly motivated to enter a company such as yours which offers excellent professional growth opportunities.  Please contact me at my home number at (973) 222-2222 or via e-mail and suggest a time and date when you would like to schedule an interview.  I will confirm it promptly.  Thank you for your consideration.

 

Your name

 

<Begin resume>

 

insert resume copy.  Do not send resume as an attachment.  Most recruiters will not open it, for fear of viruses.

 

<End resume>

 

The notification of 'begin resume' and 'end resume' allows the reader to copy it, forward it, or feed it into a resume bank. If the company requests that your resume be sent as an attachment, then it is fine to send it in the requested format.

Questions Asked by Employers

Personal
  1. Tell me about yourself.
  2. What are your hobbies?
  3. Why did you choose to interview with our organization?
  4. Describe your ideal job.
  5. What can you offer us?
  6. What do you consider to be your greatest strengths?
  7. Can you name some weaknesses?
  8. Define success. Failure.
  9. Have you ever had any failures? What did you learn from them?
  10. Of which three accomplishments are you most proud?
  11. Who are your role models? Why?
  12. How does your college education or work experience relate to this job?
  13. What motivates you most in a job?
  14. Have you had difficulty getting along with a former professor / supervisor / co-worker and how did you handle it?
  15. Have you ever spoken before a group of people? How large?
  16. Why should we hire you rather than another candidate?
  17. What do you know about our organization (products or services)?
  18. Where do you want to be in five years? Ten years?
  19. Do you plan to return to school for further education?

Education

  1. Why did you choose your major?
  2. Why did you choose to attend your college or university?
  3. Do you think you received a good education? In what ways?
  4. In which campus activities did you participate?
  5. Which classes in your major did you like best? Least? Why?
  6. Which elective classes did you like best? Least? Why?
  7. If you were to start over, what would you change about your education?
  8. Do your grades accurately reflect your ability? Why or why not?
  9. Were you financially responsible for any portion of your college education?

Experience

  1. What job-related skills have you developed?
  2. Did you work while going to school? In what positions?
  3. What did you learn from these work experiences?
  4. What did you enjoy most about your last employment? Least?
  5. Have you ever quit a job? Why?
  6. Give an example of a situation in which you provided a solution to an employer.
  7. Give an example of a time in which you worked under deadline pressure.
  8. Have you ever done any volunteer work? What kind?
  9. How do you think a former supervisor would describe your work?

Career Goals

  1. Do you prefer to work under supervision or on your own?
  2. What kind of boss do you prefer?
  3. Would you be successful working with a team?
  4. Do you prefer large or small organizations? Why?
  5. What other types of positions are you considering?
  6. How do you feel about working in a structured environment?
  7. Are you able to work on several assignments at once?
  8. . How do you feel about working overtime?
  9. How do you feel about travel?
  10. How do you feel about the possibility of relocating?
  11. Are you willing to work flextime?

Before you begin interviewing, think about these questions and possible responses and discuss them with a career advisor. Conduct mock interviews and be sure you are able to communicate clear, unrehearsed answers to interviewers.

 

 

Engineering Management

The Engineering Management program develops engineers and other technically trained individuals for leadership roles in a technologically based, project-oriented enterprises. Engineering Management is a balanced program that applies engineering principles to managerial functions. The program provides engineering and technical professionals with broad-based knowledge and skills to succeed as organizational managers and project managers, from conceptualization through implementation. Students who graduate with a Master's in Engineering Management will work as project leads and managers for engineering and technology based companies.

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Related Career Titles for Engineering Management

Acquisitions Planner

Administrator

Associate Engineer

Attorney

Banker

Building & Facilities Coordinator

Business Analyst

Capital Planner Chairman

Chief of Industrial Engineering Branch

Chief of Readiness for Civil Engineering

College and University Professor

Construction Supervisor

Consultant

Contract Buyer/Administration

Counter Intelligence Platoon Leader

Customer Service Representative

Data Analyst

Department Head

Department Manager

Deputy Manager

Design Engineer

Director Business of Management

Director of Design & Development

Director of Marketing and Sales

Director of Manufacturing Plant Operations

Director of Operations

Director of Procurement & Customer Service

Electronic Commerce Project Manger

Employee Relations Department Manager

Engineering and Design Consultant

Engineering Sales

Engineering Specialist

Engineering Technician

Executive Vice President

Facility Manager

Financial Analyst

General Administrator

Group Marketing Manager

Head of Quality Programs Branch

Head Computer Operations

High School Teacher

Hospital Administrator

Manager of Manufacturing

Manager of Marketing and Planning

Manager of Measurement

Manager of Waste Clean-up

Manager of Petroleum Systems

Manager of Production Engineering

Manager of Information Systems

Manufacturing Engineer

Manufacturing Manager

Manufacturing Team Manager

Manufacturing Engineering Supervisor

Materials Manager

Plant Manager

President, CEO and Founder

President-Owner

Production Supervisor

Quality Assurance Manager

Quality Assurance Engineer

Senior Manufacturing Technologist

Senior Research Engineer

Service Industrial Engineering. Manager

Software Engineer

Supervisor

Systems Engineering Manager

Technical Sales Engineer 

Industries That Hire Engineering Management Majors

Manufacturing

Hospitals

Banks

Retailers

Retail Outlets

Financial Investment Companies

Utilities

Waste Management & Remediation Services

Wholesale Trade Organizations

Petroleum & Coal Product Manufacturers

Scientific Research & Development Services

Aerospace Product Companies

Building, Developing, & General Contractors

Chemical Companies

Local and State Governments

Federal Government

Engineering Firms

Consultant Companies

Computer Companies

Electrical Equipment, Appliance, and Component Manufacturing

Telecommunications Companies

Colleges and Universities

High Schools

Military

Personal Care Product Companies

Automobile Manufacturing Companies

Transportation Services

Airlines

Transportation and Distribution Companies

Banks

U.S. Dept. of Defense

 

Web Sites For Engineering Management Majors

The American Society for Engineering Management

IEE Management

IEEE EMS Homepage

American Society for Engineering Management

 

Resources in the Career Resource Center

BOOKS

  • Job Choices for Science, Engineering, and Technology Students
  • Career Advancement and Survival for Engineers
  • Careers In Science and Engineering
  • Career Information Center: Agribusiness, Environment, and Office
  • Career Information Center: Engineering, Science, and Technology
  • Career Information Center: Manufacturing
  • Career Information Center: Employment Trends and Master Index
  • The New Complete Guide To Environmental Careers
  • Green At Work
  • IEEE Marketing for Engineers
  • IEEE Writing for Career Growth
  • IEEE Presentations that Work
  • IEEE Building Internal Team Partnerships
  • IEEE Teaching on TV and Video
  • IEEE Starting a High Tech Company
  • IEEE High Tech Creativity
  • IEEE Working in a Global Environment
  • The Complete Guide To Occupational Exploration
  • The O*Net Dictionary of Occupational Titles
  • Job Opportunities in Engineering and Computer Science
  • Great Jobs for Engineering Majors

FOLDERS (Contain Information on Different Careers)

  • All Majors

 

Biology

Biology is center-stage in scientific study. Advances in molecular biology and the impetus of the Human Genome Project have led to a focus on the life sciences. The combination of biology and the field of information technology promises an equally exciting future in the years ahead. Biologists work in basic science research and teaching, as well as enter graduate or professional programs in the biological or medical sciences. Possible employment in business firms and laboratories may result from majoring in biology as well.

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Related Career Titles for Biology

Administrative (Healthcare)

Agricultural/Natural Resources

Animal Scientist

Aquarium and Museum Worker

Aquatic Biologist

Biochemist

Bioengineering

Bio-Technologist

Brand/Product Management

Buyer/Merchandising

Computer Programming

Consulting

Counseling

Customer Service

Dentist

Design/Construction Engineering

Environmental Health Specialist

Environmental Protection Worker

Financial Analyst

Forensics Worker

Health Officer

Hospital Administrator

Industrial Hygienist

Information Systems

Insurance (Underwriting)

Management Trainee (Entry-Level Management)

Marine Biologist

Marine Engineering Technician

Marketing Researcher

Medical Laboratory Science Teacher

Medical Librarian

Medical Technologist

Meteorologist

Microbiologist 

 Military

Molecular Biologist

Mortician

Naturalist

Naval Architect Dietitian and Nutritionist

Nutritionist

Other Engineering (NEC)

Other Health Related (NEC)

Optometrist

Paramedic

Performing Arts/Entertainment

Pharmacy Technician

Physician

Physician Assistant

Physical Therapist

Quality Control

Registered Nurses

Research & Development

Research (Non-technical)

Research Scientist

Research (Technical/Scientific)

Respiratory Therapy

Sales - Non-technical

Science Laboratory Technician

Shipbuilder/Repair

Soil Conservationist

Software Design & Development

State Parks and Recreation Worker

Systems/Programming Engineering

Teaching Administration (Social Services)

Tourist Worker

Urban/Regional Planning

Veterinarian

Industries That Hire Biology Majors

Accounting, Tax Preparation, Bookkeeping, & Payroll Services

Aerospace Product and Parts Manufactures

Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing, & Hunting Services

Banks

Building, Developing, & General Contracting

Chemical Companies

Communication Services

Computer and Electronic Products Manufacturers

Computer Systems Design/Computer Manufacturers

Consulting Companies

Colleges and Universities

High Schools

Electrical Equipment, Appliance, & Component Manufacturers

Employment Services

Engineering Services

Financial Services

Transportation Services

Transportation Equipment

Utilities

Federal Government

State and Local Government

Hospitals

Investigation & Security Services

 Healthcare and Social Assistance Agencies

Insurance Carriers

Accommodation & Food Services

Legal Services

Medical Equipment & Supplies

Nonmetallic Mineral Products

Marine Sciences

Metallic Products

Military

Petroleum & Coal Products

Pharmaceuticals & Medicine

Publishing (Newspaper, Periodical, Book, & Data Base Publishers)

Real Estate

Religious, Grant writing, Civic, Professional, & Similar Organizations

Scientific Research & Development Services

Soap, Cleaning Compound, & Toilet Preparations

Textile Mills

Veterinarian Hospitals

Waste Management & Remediation Services

Wholesale Trade

Wood Products

Zoos

 

Web Sites For Biology Majors

SciJobs.org

Biology Jobs

Frontiers in Bioscience: The Virtual Library

The BioCareer Center

Resources in the Career Resource Center

BOOKS

  • Job Choices for Science, Engineering, and Technology Students
  • Kaplan: Medical School Admission Advisor 2001
  • Newsweek Careers 2000
  • VGM’s Handbook of Scientific & Technical Careers (2nd ed.)
  • 1995-96 Pharmaceutical Industry Guide
  • Careers in Science and Engineering
  • Jobs You Can Live With
  • Career Information Center: Engineering, Science & Technology
  • Career Information Center: Employment Trends & Master Index
  • The New Complete Guide to Environmental Careers
  • Environmental Jobs for Scientists & Engineers
  • Green At Work
  • Krupin’s Toll Free Environmental Directory
  • The Complete Guide for Occupational Exploration
  • The O*Net Dictionary of Occupational Titles
  • Job Opportunities in Health and Science
  • Great Jobs for Biology Majors
  • College Majors and Careers
  • Guide to Careers in the Health Profession

FOLDERS

  • All Majors
  • Biology

 

Biomedical Engineering

Biomedical Engineering stresses the application of the principles and practices of engineering, science, and mathematics in solving clinical problems in medicine and surgery. Biomedical engineering students can concentrate on the chemical, computer, electrical, industrial or mechanical engineering aspects of biomedical engineering. Students who graduate with a degree in Biomedical Engineering have the background for employment by a medical instrument or device company, for biomedical research, or for continued education toward a more advanced degree in biomedical engineering or medicine.

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Related Career Titles for Biomedical Engineering

Biomedical Engineer

Biomedical Equipment Technician

Communications

Computer Programmer

Consultant

Design/Construction Engineer

Engineering Manager

Environmental/Sanitation Engineer

Field Service Engineer

Financial Analyst

High School Teacher

Human Resources Manager

Industrial Engineer

Investment Banking

Mechanical Engineer

Medical Technology

Non-Technical Sales

Nuclear Medicine

Testing Engineer

Software Engineer

Quality Control Engineer

Power Systems Engineer

Project Engineer

Software Engineer

Technical and Scientific Research

Technical Recruiter

Technical Service Engineer

Technical Support Specialist

Technical Writer/Editor

University Professor

X-Ray Field Service Technician`

 

Industries That Hire Biomedical Engineering Majors

Chemical Companies

Computer Systems Design Companies

Computer Consulting Firms

Colleges and Universities

High Schools

Electrical Equipment, Appliance, & Component Manufacturers

Engineering Services

Federal Government

Healthcare Agencies

Social Assistance Agencies

Hospitals

Pharmaceutical and Medicine Companies

Scientific Research & Development Services

Transportation Equipment

Banks

Publishing Companies

State and Local Government

Financial Services

Communication Services

Legal Services

Employment Services

Medical Equipment & Supplies

 

Web Sites For Biomedical Engineering Majors

JobScience.com

The Biomedical Engineering Network

IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Science

BiomedicalEngineer.com

 

Resources in the Career Resource Center

BOOKS

  • Job Choices for Science, Engineering, and Technology Students
  • Newsweek Careers 2000
  • Graduate Programs in Engineering and Applied Sciences
  • VGM’s Handbook of Scientific and Technical Careers
  • Career Advancement and Survival for Engineers
  • Jobs You Can Live With
  • Career Information Center: Engineering, Science, and Technology
  • Career Information Center: Employment Trends and Master Index
  • IEEE Marketing for Engineers
  • IEEE Writing for Career Growth
  • IEEE Presentations That Work
  • IEEE Building Internal Team Partnerships
  • IEEE Teaching on TV and Video
  • IEEE Starting a High Tech Company
  • IEEE High Tech Creativity
  • IEEE Working in a Global Environment
  • The Complete Guide for Occupational Exploration
  • The O*Net Dictionary of Occupational Titles
  • Great Jobs for Engineering Majors
  • Job Opportunities in Engineering and Computer Science
  • Job Opportunities in Health and Science
  • Guide to Careers in the Health Profession
  • College Majors and Careers

FOLDERS

  • All Majors
  • Biomedical Engineering

 

 

Biomedical Informatics

Biomedical informatics is the study, invention, and utilization of health computing solutions and systems. This field covers a broad spectrum of information relating to all aspects of health care, including, but not limited to, hospital billing, medical education, clinical and laboratory data management, medical and surgical diagnoses, medical imaging, biomedical modeling and simulation, and health sciences and pharmaceutical research.

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Related Career Titles for Biomedical Informatics

Biomedical Modeler

Clinical Information Manager

Clinical Researcher

Consultant

Data Administrator

Data Manager

Doctor

Grant Writer

Hospital Biller

Hospital Information Systems Administrator

Human Factors Engineer

Image Analyst

Informatics-Knowledgeable Medical Practitioner Medical Diagnoses

Medical Education Instructor

Medical Imaging Specialist

Nurse

Laboratory Manager

Library Systems Administrator

Pharmaceutical Researcher

Programmer

Researcher

Software Engineer

Teacher

Test Interpreter

Web Site Developer

Industries That Hire Biomedical Informatics Majors

Hospitals

Universities

Medical Schools

Pharmaceutical Companies

Computer and Software Companies

Public Policy Offices

Research Centers

Consulting Services

Medical Libraries

Medical Insurance Companies

Marketing Agencies

Military

 

Web Sites For Biomedical Informatics Majors

American Medical Informatics Association

HireRx

Biomedical Informatics Research Network

Biohealthmatics

Resources in the Career Resource Center

BOOKS

  • Job Choices for Science, Engineering, and Technology Students
  • Newsweek Careers 2000
  • Careers In Science and Engineering
  • The O*Net Dictionary of Occupational Titles
  • Job Opportunities in Health and Science
  • Guide to Careers in the Health Profession

FOLDERS

  • All Majors

 

CareerShift Job Hunting & Career Management Solutions

Organize and manage your job hunt campaign by searching and storing every job listing on all job boards, including contact and company information.

Click here to use CareerShift job hunting and career management solutions.

 

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