Green

Course Descriptions

College of Architecture & Design

Certificate in Sustainable Architecture

Arch 663 - Introduction to Sustainable Architecture (3 credits) Prerequisite: Arch 523G. Environment design of buildings. The five characteristics of green buildings: sustainable sites, water efficiency, energy and atmosphere, materials and resources, and indoor environmental quality. The US Green Building Council's Green Building Rating System, review of several major buildings of exemplary design.

Arch 664 - Indoor Environmental Quality in Sustainable Design Buildings (3 credits) Prerequisite: Arch 523G. Supportive ambient conditions, including thermal comfort and acceptable indoor air quality, visual comfort, and appropriate acoustical quality, overall physical and psychological well-being for workplace quality, performance and productivity.

Arch 665 - Sustainable Design of Energy Efficient Buildings (3 credits) Prerequisite: Arch 523G. Evaluation of heating and cooling loads, impact on fuel consumption, energy software analysis for design and efficiency. Technology of passive solar design and building integrated photovoltaics.

Arch 666 - Sustainable Design with Efficient Materials and Resources (3 credits) Prerequisite: Arch 523G. Environmentally sensitive site design; issues of wildlife habitat, erosion, ground water recharge, and threats to water quality of surface water bodies and aquifers. Water reclamation, materials and energy conservation, waste reduction and recycling.


M.S. Arch in Sustainable Architecture (Required Courses in addition to Certificate Courses Above)

Arch 662 - Special Topics in Architecture (3 credits) Topics vary each semester. Refer to the School of Architecture bulletin during university registration periods for a list of current topics and possible prerequisites.

Arch 700 - Master’s Project (3 credits)

Arch 226 - Building Systems II (0-3-3) Prerequisites: Arch 164, Arch 156 and Arch 225. Continuing Systems I, this course is an introductory survey of the interrelationship of the principles and application of Sustainable Design, Site Design, Structural Systems, Environmental Systems, Envelope Systems and Materials and Assembly Systems. This course will primarily focus on low and medium-rise concrete and masonry structures and is coordinated with a studio design/build experience.

Arch 325 - Building Systems III (0-3-3) Prerequisite: Arch 226. An introductory survey of the basic principles of building, environmental control, and service systems as these relate to the building envelope, this course will primarily cover thermal enclosure, climate modification, environmental systems, energy use, and sustainable design. It also introduces the principles of health and safety in the design of buildings.

Arch 538 - Sustainable Architecture (3 credits) Follows two precepts: accepting responsibility for the consequences of design decisions upon human well-being, and the long-term viability of natural systems. Topics include sustainable site design and development, environmentally sensitive building materials, lifecycle cost benefit analysis of building systems, and adaptive reuse.

Arch 546 - Designing and Optimizing the Building Enclosure (3 credits) Prerequisites: Arch 386, CIS 104. Considers the "building envelope,” the boundary dividing the inside of a structure from the outside environment. Study and design optimal enclosures considering energy exchange, the relationship between energy and light, and life cycle costs.

Arch 564 - Comprehensive Studio (1-12-5) Prerequisite: Arch 463 and 563. Studio focuses on the student's ability to produce a comprehensive architectural project based on a building program and site that includes development of programmed spaces demonstrating an understanding of structural and environmental systems, building envelope systems, life-safety provisions, wall sections and building assemblies and the principles of sustainability.

Arch 541G - Building Systems I: Intro. to Building Technologies (3 credits) This course is an introductory survey of the general principles and application of Sustainable Design, Site Systems, Structural Systems, Environmental Systems, Envelope Systems, Materials and Assembly Systems. This course will primarily focus on low-rise wood and steel structures.

Arch 542G - Building Systems II: Integrated Building Technologies (3 credits) Continuing Systems I. This course is an introductory survey of the interrelationship of the principles and applications of Sustainable Design, Site Design, Structural Systems, Environmental Systems, Envelope Systems and Materials and Assembly Systems. This course will primarily focus on low and medium-rise concrete and masonry structures and is coordinated with a studio design/build experience.

Arch 583 - Green Urbanism: A critical Appraisal of the Sustainable City (3 credits)

Arch 646 - Designing and Optimizing the Building Enclosure (3 credits) Prerequisite: completion of core sequence. Considers the "building envelope," the boundary dividing the inside of a structure from the outside environment. Students study and design optimal enclosures considering energy exchange, the relationship between energy and lighting, and life cycle costs.

Arch 650 - Economy of Building (3 credits) Prerequisite: completion of core sequence or equivalent. Economic consequences of design decisions. Topics include: relationship among economy, efficiency and quality; life-cycle cost of design; improving the economy of building processes and products through innovation; and environmental concerns. This course is required for the dual degree M.Arch./Master of Science in Management program. It can also be used as an elective in the M.Arch. program.

Arch 662 - Green Urbanism: A critical Appraisal of the Sustainable City (3 credits)

Arch 663 - Introduction to Sustainable Architecture (3 credits) Prerequisite: Arch 523G. Environment design of buildings. The five characteristics of green buildings: sustainable sites, water efficiency, energy and atmosphere, materials and resources, and indoor environmental quality. The US Green Building Council's Green Building Rating System, review of several major buildings of exemplary design.

Arch 664 - Indoor Environmental Quality in Sustainable Design Buildings (3 credits) Prerequisite: Arch 523G. Supportive ambient conditions, including thermal comfort and acceptable indoor air quality, visual comfort, and appropriate acoustical quality, overall physical and psychological well-being for workplace quality, performance and productivity.

Arch 665 - Sustainable Design of Energy Efficient Buildings (3 credits) Prerequisite: Arch 523G. Evaluation of heating and cooling loads, impact on fuel consumption, energy software analysis for design and efficiency. Technology of passive solar design and building integrated photovoltaics.

Arch 666 - Sustainable Design with Efficient Materials and Resources (3 credits) Prerequisite: Arch 523G. Environmentally sensitive site design; issues of wildlife habitat, erosion, ground water recharge, and threats to water quality of surface water bodies and aquifers. Water reclamation, materials and energy conservation, waste reduction and recycling.

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College of Science & Liberal Arts

Biological Sciences Courses (federated):

Biol 368 - The Ecology and Evolution of Disease (3 credits) This course addresses those aspects of ecology and evolutionary biology most relevant to understanding the origin, dynamics and treatment of disease (both infectious and hereditary/genetic). The class will be a mixture of lecture and discussion of case studies. Material covered will include biology, mathematical models, and some aspects of human behavior.


Environmental Policy & Study Courses:

EPS 202 - Society, Technology, and the Environment (3 credits) Prerequisite: HSS 101. Uses case studies to examine the relationships between the creation and use of technologies, the human and natural environment, and the development of social and cultural institutions. Its central theme is the manner in which human society structures the environment in which it lives: nature and culture, city and country, civilization and development. This course satisfies 3 credits of the Basic Social Sciences GUR. Honors Note: See HSS 101.

EPS 622 - Sustainable Development (3 credits) Prerequisite: EPS 612 Challenges of sustainable development in the United States and in other countries, influence of sustainable development concepts on environmental decision-making, sustainable development as a paradigm for environmental policy-making.

EPS 660 - Ethics and Environmental Policy (3 credits) Contemporary environmental problems from the perspective of ethics or moral philosophy. Is there a moral obligation to preserve or protect the natural environment? What are the ethical presumptions and values underlying environmental policy? Are traditional theories of moral philosophy applicable to contemporary environmental problems, or is a new conception of the relationship between humanity and nature needed?


Environmental Science Courses:

EvSc 375 - Environmental Biology (3 credits) An introductory ecological approach to understanding man's impact and dependence on the natural environment. Broad topics include ecosystems, nutrient cycles, pollution, pest management, conservation of natural resources, energy, and human population.

EvSc 385 - Environmental Microbiology (3 credits) The main goals of this course are to present an overview of the important microbes involved in environmental microbiology, to discuss the environments where they are found, to learn how they are detected and monitored, and to describe their effects on humans. Traditional lectures and exams will be supplemented with discussions of experimental design and data interpretation by reading current research articles.

EvSc 416 - Environmental Toxicology (3 credits) The course is intended to explore the general principles of toxicology and apply them to the assessment of acute, subacute and chronic effects of hazardous and toxic chemicals. Qualitative and quantitative measures of toxicity and testing protocols are addressed. The role of toxicology in risk assessment and risk management is discussed.

EvSc 602 - Special Topics in Environmental Science I (3 credits) Prerequisite: approval of graduate advisor in environmental science. Topics of current interest in the environmental field.

EvSc 613 - Environmental Problem Solving (3 credits) Prerequisite: graduate standing. This course is designed to study solutions for current environmental problems. Students are asked to respond to an imaginary Request for Proposal (RFP) in writing and before a team of technical experts at an oral presentation. Solutions proposed in student RFPs must reflect knowledge of environmental science and technology in current use.

EvSc 615 - Global Environmental Problems (3 credits) Prerequisite: graduate standing. With an understanding that environmental problems are not restricted by geographical boundaries, relationships of the earth's temperature balance, global air circulation patterns, global energy needs, and control and remediation technologies are studied.

EvSc 621 - Ecological Risk Assessment (3 credits)


History Courses (federated):

Hist 334 - Environmental History of North America (3 credits) Prerequisites: Prerequisites: HUM 101 and two from among HUM 102, HUM 211, HUM 212 and Hist 213 or their equivalents. The history of interactions between humans and their natural environment on the North American Continent. Considers perceptions of, use of, and alteration of the environment. Traces the cultural, intellectual, economic, political and technological transformations from early colonial times to the late 20th century. Addresses the diverse environmentalisms that have emerged the last several decades.

Hist 386 - Technology in American History (3 credits) Prerequisites: HUM 101 and two from among HUM 102, HUM 211, HUM 212 and Hist 213 or their equivalents. Survey of the history of American technology emphasizing the social and economic environments of technological change. Topics include the transfer of technology in building canals and cities, the rise of the factory system, the emergence of the American system of manufacture, and the development of major technological systems such as the railroad, telegraph, electric light and power, and automobile production and use. Focus on the professionalization of engineering practice, the industrialization of invention, and the growing links between engineers and corporate capitalism in the 20th century.


Humanities Course:

Eng 352 - Technical Writing (3 credits) (Special section) Prerequisites: HUM 101 and two from among HUM 102, HUM 211, HUM 212 and Hist 213 or their equivalents. An advanced writing course. Combines current theory with actual practice to prepare students as technical writers. Analyze complex communication situations and design appropriate responses through tasks that involve problem solving, rhetorical theory, document design, oral presentations, writing teams, audience awareness, ethical considerations, and gender equity issues.

Physics Courses:

Phys 203 - The Earth in Space (3 credits) Prerequisite: None. Introduces fundamental phenomena, such as plate tectonics, erosion, volcanism, and glaciation. Studies the interaction between the Earth's four major reservoirs: atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere and solid earth; investigates the dependence of the Earth on the Sun; the effect of the Moon on the Earth. Extends knowledge gained from studying the Earth to other planets in this solar system.

Phys 320 - Astronomy and Astrophysics I (3 credits) Prerequisites: Phys 121 or Phys 121H, with grade of C or better. A quantitative introduction to the astronomy of the sun, earth, and solar system, with an emphasis on the physical principles involved. Includes celestial mechanics, planetary atmospheres and the physics of comets, asteroids and meteorites.

Phys 780 - (Special Topics) Spring 09: Earth’s Atmospheric Processes (3 credits) Prerequisites: A 3 credit programming course (preferably C or C++). Covers advanced topics of virtual instrumentation including use of IEEE GPIB, RS232 interfaces, and data acquisition boards. The students will learn how to interface a computer to various/ multiple instruments for data acquisition and instrument control. The software platform will be state-of-the-art software such as National Instrument’s LABVIEW software. The emphasis is not on the electronic aspects of the IEEE GPIB or RS232 interfaces but rather on the practical aspects of interfacing a computer to various instruments, real-time data acquisition, and error handling. This is an essential skill for all science and engineering graduate students.


Professional & Technical Communication Course:

PTC 631 - Communication and Environmental Problem Solving (3 credits) Prerequisite or corequisite: PTC 601. Develops critical thinking on ecological issues for problem solving by integrating technical information, human values, and communication with environmental change. Students combine theory, research and models, case studies, visual thinking, and scientific inquiry for application in individual decision-making course project.

Science, Technology, & Society Courses:

STS 308 - Technology and Global Development: Introduction to STS (3 credits) Prerequisites: HSS 101, HSS 202 or their equivalents; two from HSS 211, HSS 212, Hist 213 or their equivalents. Introduces the important public issues that technology brings to the modern world, such as energy development and environmental pollution. Emphasizes the close connections between science and technology, social institutions, and cultural values. Also analyzes today's "global village", the changing relations between East and West and the Third World, and worldwide development and environmental issues. Honors Note: See HSS 101.

STS 310 - Technology and Human Values (3 credits) Prerequisites: HSS 101, HSS 202 or their equivalents; two from HSS 211, HSS 212, Hist 213 or their equivalents. Examines the interactions between science, technology and human values. Specifically, explores psychological, moral, and philosophical consequences of, and humanistic responses to, technological change. Readings, essays, fiction, and research articles treat such topics as the philosophical foundations of modern science, scientism, technicism; the impact of technology on images of man found in modern literature; and the moral implications of various kinds of recent technology. Honors Note: See HSS 101.

STS 312 - Technology and Policy in Contemporary America (3 credits) Prerequisites: HSS 101, HSS 202 or their equivalents; two from HSS 211, HSS 212, Hist 213 or their equivalents. A study of technology and politics in recent America. Focuses on the role of the federal government in shaping technology, especially through funding technological innovations and applications. Topics will include the origins of technology policy in World War II, the influence of the Cold War, the science and technology policy advisory system, and political and cultural influences on technology policy. Honors Note: See HSS 101.

STS 313 - Environmental History and Policy (3 credits) Prerequisites: HSS 101, HSS 202 or their equivalents; two from HSS 211, HSS 212, Hist 213 or their equivalents. Covers the rise of the modern environmental debate, and examines its current priorities and values, politics and economics, and impacts on industry and society. Students review the role of regulatory agencies, private industry, public interest groups, and the media. Current major issues in New Jersey are considered, as well as environmental debate on a national and global level. Honors Note: See HSS 101.

STS 360 - Ethics and the Environment (3 credits) Prerequisites: HSS 101, HSS 202 or their equivalents; two from HSS 211, HSS 212, Hist 213 or their equivalents. An examination of contemporary environmental problems from the perspective of ethics or moral philosophy. An analysis of the ethical presuppositions and value principles underlying environmental policy. The study of ethical theories and their application to the environmental crisis. Honors Note: See HSS 101.

STS 378 - Literature and Nature (3 credits) Prerequisites: HSS 101, HSS 202 or their equivalents; two from HSS 211, HSS 212, Hist 213 or their equivalents. Literature reveals and interprets the natural world. Students examine the ways that nature has been used in non-fiction and fiction. Students also learn the challenge of describing the natural world in their own words. Representative writers include Percy Shelley, Henry David Thoreau, Octavio Paz, Denise Levertov, Gary Snyder, Joyce Carol Oates, and Annie Dillard. Co-listed as Lit 378.

STS 382 - Geographical Perspectives on the Environment (3 credits) Prerequisites: HSS 101, HSS 202 or their equivalents; two from HSS 211, HSS 212, Hist 213 or their equivalents. Designed to introduce students to the field of geography. Focuses on the natural processes that sculpt the physical and biological terrain, and the environmental interrelationships between human societies and nature. Combining physical, human and environmental perspectives on the earth's surface, explores, in depth, topics such as famine, societal response to natural and technological hazards, and water issues in the United States.

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Newark College of Engineering

Civil Engineering Courses:

CE 321 - Water Resources Engineering (3 credits) Prerequisite: CE 200, CE 200A, Math 225. Training in methods of developing water supplies and the means to treat supplies for consumptive use. Covers hydrologic techniques such as surface and ground water yield, hydrograph and routing analyses, and probabilistic methods related to hydrologic studies.

CE 342 - Geology (3 credits) Prerequisite: consult the advisor. Studies science of geology with emphasis on physical geological processes. Stresses the principle of uniformity of process in the context of rock and soil formation, transformation, deformation, and mass movement. Includes aspects of historical geology and geomorphology.

CE 494 - Civil Engineering Design I (3 credits) Prerequisite: senior standing in civil engineering. Simulates the submission and acceptance process normally associated with the initial design phases for a civil engineering project. Familiarizes students with the preparation of sketch plats, preliminary engineering design, and a related environmental assessment. Requirements include written submittals and oral presentations in defense of the project.

CE 495 - Civil Engineering Design II (3 credits) Prerequisite: senior standing in civil engineering. Provides students with the type of design experience they would receive if engaged in civil and environmental engineering design practice. Course will focus on one or more of these design areas: structural, geotechnical, transportation and planning, and sanitary and environmental engineering.

CE 603 - Introduction to Urban Transportation Planning (3 credits) Urban travel patterns and trends; community and land activity related to transportation study techniques including survey methods, network analysis, assignment and distribution techniques. Case studies of statewide and urban areas are examined. Same as Tran 603.

CE 644 - Geology in Engineering (3 credits) Prerequisites: undergraduate course in geology or permission of instructor. Geology has a significant influence on how we plan, design, and construct engineering works. This course examines how the geologic formations underlying a locale will ultimately determine land use, control structure design, and affect construction material availability. Included is a study of the various rock-forming processes and geologic agents that have shaped Earth's surface. The course also explores the role of geologic factors in assessing environmental impacts and natural hazards such as earthquakes, subsiding soils, and landslides. Case study applications and a field trip are included.

CE 655 - Land Use Planning (3 credits) Spatial relations of human behavior patterns to land use; methods of employment and population studies are evaluated; location and spatial requirements are related to land use plans; and concepts of urban renewal and recreational planning are investigated by case studies. Same as MIP 655 and Tran 655.

Electrical Engineering Courses:

ECE 341 - Energy Conversion (3 credits) Prerequisite: ECE 231. Magnetic materials and their applications including the design of singly- and multiply-excited magnetic circuits and transformers, and the steady-state performance of dc and ac electromechanical energy converters.

ECE 441 - Power Electronics (3 credits) Prerequisites: ECE 373. Electronic devices and circuits used to energize various apparatus and systems. Topics include circuits, freewheeling diodes, thyristors, firing and commutation of silicon-controlled rectifiers, converters, dc choppers, and power supplies.

ECE 442 - Power Systems Elective (3 credits) Prerequisite: ECE 341. Introduction to power plants and power networks. Topics include transmission line parameters, system modeling, economic operations of power systems, load flow studies, short circuit analysis, and power system stability.

ECE 449 - Power Systems Laboratory (0-4-2) Prerequisites: ECE 494. Corequisite: ECE 442. Laboratory work in the design and synthesis of power systems, closely coordinated with the power systems elective.

ECE 415 - Electrical Engineering Project (1-2-2) Prerequisites: ECE 373, ECE 413, ECE 494. A synthesis and focusing of previous experience, in and out of college, upon one or more electrical engineering projects selected by the student. Involves library research, design, cost analysis, construction and testing. Projects are shared in final project presentations.

ECE 416 - Electrical and Computer Engineering Project II (3 credits) Prerequisites: ECE 414. Projects must involve the design and execution of both hardware and software or firmware, and include library research, cost estimation and time budgeting. An oral pres-entation and demonstration of the project must be given. A final written report must be submitted.

ECE 417 - Independent Study (3 credits) Prerequisites: ECE 414. Students work on various individually selected projects guided by the department faculty. The project(s) of each student must be completed and professionally presented by assigned due dates for appropriate review and recording of accomplishment. An oral presentation will be made at a meeting of all students and faculty advisors involved in the course. A formal written report will be presented to the faculty advisor at the end of the course.

ECE 610 - Power System Steady-State Analysis (3 credits) Prerequisite: B.S. in EE or ME. Steady-state analysis of power system networks, particularly real and reactive power flows under normal conditions and current flows under faulty conditions. Symmetrical components and digital solutions are emphasized.

ECE 611 - Transients in Power Systems (3 credits) Prerequisite: ECE 610. Transient performance of power systems with lumped properties, interruption of arcs, restriking voltage, re-ignition inertia effects, switching of rotational systems, magnetic saturation in stationary networks, harmonic oscillations, saturated systems, transient performance of synchronous machines.

ECE 612 - Computer Methods Applied to Power Systems (3 credits) Prerequisite: undergraduate computer programming. Digital computer techniques proven successful in the solution of power system problems, particularly in the electric utility industry. Emphasis on short-circuit, load flow, and transient stability problems. Matrix sparsity is considered.

ECE 613 - Protection of Power Systems (3 credits)

ECE 616 - Power Electronics (3 credits) Prerequisite: B.S. in electrical engineering. Principles of thyristor devices, dynamic characteristics of choppers, commutation, protection, voltage-fed and current-fed inverter drives, cycloconverters, pulse width modulation, phase control, and microcomputer control, with case studies.

ECE 618 - Renewable Energy Systems (3 credits) This course introduces renewable energy systems. It covers the fundamental concepts of energy and radiation with specific solar energy applications and photovoltaics, electrical energy storage systems, and thermal energy and storage. The second part covers the basic science of wind energy systems and their electrical system designs. The third part covers the bioenergy systems from resources to final products and conversion technologies. It finally introduces other promising energy sources.

ECE 657 - Semiconductor Devices (3 credits) Fundamental principles of solid state materials necessary for understanding semiconductor devices. Topics include crystal structure; energy bands; electron and hole generation, and transport phenomena; generation and recombination processes, and high field effects. P-N junction diode, metal semiconductor contact, and bipolar and metal oxide semiconductor transistors, including switching phenomena and circuit models. Introduction to: photonic devices, light-emitting diodes, semiconductor lasers, photo detectors, and solar cells; microwave devices~tunnel and IMPATT diodes, transferred electron devices, and charge-coupled capacitors.

ECE 659 - Fabrication Principles of Electronic and Optoelectronic Devices (3 credits) Prerequisite: ECE 657 or equivalent. Overview of all major processing steps in fabrication of integrated circuits such as crystal growth, epitaxy, oxidation, diffusion, ion implantation and etching. Formation of thin film structures along with techniques for defining submicron structures. Emphasizes silicon device technology but also includes processing of compound semiconductors such as gallium arsenide.


Environmental Engineering Courses:

EnE 262 - Introduction to Environmental Engineering (3-1-3) Prerequisites: Chem 126, Math 112, and Phys 121. To introduce students to the integrated science, engineering, design and management concepts of engineered environmental systems. The course will cover environmental regulations and standards, environmental parameters, mass balance and natural systems, water quality management, water and wastewater treatment, air pollution control, noise pollution, and solid and hazardous waste management. Background material and laboratories in the environmental sciences and management areas will be covered. Group term papers and presentations will be required.

EnE 360 - Water and Waste Water Engineering (3 credits) Prerequisites: EnE 262 and junior standing. Training in the methods used for water pollution control. Topics include the chemical, physical, and biological processes that occur in waste treatment design and in receiving waters; modeling schemes to determine allowable loadings in various bodies of water; and waste treatment processes used for water pollution control.

EnE 361 - Solid and Hazardous Waste Engineering (3 credits) Prerequisites: EnE 262 and junior standing. Exposure to the area of air pollution control, solid waste disposal, and radioactive waste disposal. Topics include the chemistry of contaminated atmospheres; the influence on meteorological conditions of dispersion of pollutants; abatement processes used in the control of emissions; classification and nature of solid waste, and solid waste disposal techniques; sources and methods for the disposal of radioactive contaminants; and related health effects.

EnE 620 - Environmental Chemodynamics (3 credits) The overall objective of this course is to introduce students to concepts, mechanisms, and models used to describe the transport of chemicals in the environment. Concepts and models presented in the first six weeks are applied to the air-water, sediment-water, and soil-air interfaces during the rest of the term.

EnE 660 - Introduction to Solid and Hazardous Waste Problems (3 credits) Prerequisite: EnE 663. (May be taken concurrently.) Introduction to solid waste disposal. Industrial and urban sources of solid waste and conventional methods of waste disposal. Application of engineering principles related to these topics.

EnE 662 - Site Remediation (3 credits) Prerequisite: EM 631. Can be taken concurrently with EM 631. Examines site remediation from start to finish. Includes regulations, cleanup standards, remedial investigations, feasibility studies, risk assessment, and safety. Examines established and innovative cleanup technologies such as incineration, containment, bioremediation, vapor extraction and ground water recovery.

EnE 663 - Water Chemistry (3 credits) Prerequisite: undergraduate general chemistry. The ability to analyze and solve a wide range of chemical equilibrium problems in water chemistry is developed.

EnE 664 - Physical and Chemical Treatment (3 credits) Prerequisite: EnE 663. Physical and chemical operations and processes employed in the treatment of water and wastewater. Topics include gas transfer, coagulation, flocculation, solid-liquid separation, filtration, and disinfection.

EnE 665 - Biological Treatment (3 credits) Prerequisites: EnE 663, EnE 661. (May be taken concurrently). Principles of evaluation and control of water pollution that describe aerobic treatment processes: oxidation ponds, trickling filters, and activated sludge. Anaerobic digestion and sludge handling and disposal as well as biodegradability study techniques for various wastes.

EnE 668 - Air Pollution Control (3 credits) Prerequisite: EnE 663 or physical chemistry. The nature of air pollution, its effect on the public, and legal and engineering remedies.

EnE 671 - Environmental Impact Analysis (3 credits) Prerequisite or corequisite: EnE 663. A graduate course dealing with physical aspects of the environment. Overview of environmental problems, federal and state standards, methodology for developing impact statements, case studies based on recent experience, basis for assessment and decision making.

EnE 672 - Stormwater Management (3 credits) This course provides a comprehensive study of stormwater management with emphasis on design practices. Topics include regulatory framework, an overview of structural and non-structural BMPs, groundwater recharge analysis, estimate of runoff, and design of detention basin and drainage systems.

EnE 673 - Sustainability and Life Cycle Analysis (3 credits) The course provides a systematic foundation for the connection between evolving technology and human activity impacts on natural systems by emphasizing the sources of environmental degradation and energy use and strategies to reduce risk and promote sustainability. The course provides hands-on experience with life cycle assessment computer tools and approaches. The course emphasizes relationships between industrial activities and regional and global natural systems-physical, chemical and biological-focusing on the importance of sustainability goals and practices.

Mechanical & Industrial Engineering Courses:

MnE 638 - Multi-lifecycle Engineering (3 credits) Prerequisites: basic knowledge of applied probability and statistics. Considers the fundamental elements of multi-lifecycle engineering from a systems perspective forming a framework for industrial ecology and a pathway towards sustainable development. `Topics emphasized include lifecycle assessment, demanufacturing systems, design for environment, reengineered materials, and environmental risk management and product stewardship. Assignments include working in a team setting and, when appropriate, using relevant software.

Otto H. York Department of Chemical, Biological and Pharmaceutical Engineering:
Chemical Engineering Courses:

ChE 230 - Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics I (3 credits) Prerequisites: Chem 126, (or Chem 123), Math 112, Phys 111, (or Phys 106). Corequisite: Math 211 (or Math 213). The Fundamentals of thermodynamics are applied to chemical engineering processes. Thermophysical properties and their engineering correlations are covered. Applications include chemical engineering and related fields such as environmental and biomedical engineering.

ChE 349 - Kinetics and Reactor Design (3 credits) Prerequisites: ChE 342, ChE 370, Math 222, Chem 236. Derive and solve species and energy balances for single chemical reactors; introduces heterogeneous catalysis, non-ideal reactors as ideal reactor combinations, and special topics such as polymeric or biochemical reactions.

ChE 360 - Separation Processes I (3-0-2) Prerequisites: ChE 342, ChE 370. This is the first course in separations, examines traditional methods and technologies by which chemical engineers separate and purify mixtures. Emphasis here is on strippers, absorbers, distillations, and extractions.

ChE 375 - Structure, Properties and Processing of Materials (3 credits) Prerequisites: Chem 236, (or Chem 235), Mech 320 (can be taken as co-requisite). Tailoring materials properties by engineering their microscopic/macroscopic structures via processing is central to product design and development in the chemical industry. This course introduces the principles of materials engineering from the perspective of structure-property-processing relationships. Instead of covering different types of materials separately, this course will use the principles common to engineering of all important materials as an underlying theme. These are atomic/molecular structure, nanoscale, morphology, principles of phase transformation, structure development during processing, and property dependence on structure. All these topics will be introduced through the paradigm of comparing metals, ceramics and polymers. Besides single component systems, advanced materials such as multiphase and/or multicomponent systems (e.g. composites and gels) and nanomaterials will be discussed based on these principles. An integral part of this course will be the criteria for selection of materials for the chemical process industry.

ChE 380 - Introduction to Biotechnology (3 credits) Prerequisites: Chem 123 or Chem 126. Basic principles of molecular biotechnology with selected examples of applications.

ChE 489 - Process Dynamics and Control (2-2-3) Prerequisites: ChE 349, ChE 365. This course is an introduction to chemical process dynamics and control. Topics include analysis of the dynamics of open-loop systems, the design of control systems, and the dynamics of closed-loop systems. Control techniques and methodologies, used by practicing chemical engineers, are emphasized.

ChE 602 - Selected Topics in Chemical Engineering I (3 credits) Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of the instructor. Topics of current interest in chemical engineering.

ChE 702 (S05) - Selected Topics in Chemical Engineering II. (3 credits) Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of the instructor. Topics of current interest in chemical engineering.

ChE 721 - Combustion Reaction Engineering (3 credits) Prerequisites: Undergraduate degree in Chemical or Mechanical Engineering. Topics related to the engineering of combustion systems will be discussed. These include laminar flames, turbulent combustion, ideal reactor modeling of complex combustion systems, combustion chemistry, heterogeneous combustion and incineration.

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School of Management

School of Management Courses:

Econ 265 - Microeconomics (3 credits) The theory of price determination and resource allocation under various market structures. The theory of demand, production, costs, factor and product pricing, income distribution, market failure, implications of government intervention in the market, and comparison of the free enterprise and alternative systems.

Mgmt 492 - Business Policy (3 credits) Prerequisite: senior standing. A capstone course in the area of business administration focusing on the integration of concepts taught in various functional courses such as marketing, finance, operations management, accounting, organizational behavior. Issues related to corporate responsibilities and ethical behavior are also incorporated in this course. Emphasis on application of concepts to real life situation is achieved through case discussion and projects.

Mgmt 691 - Legal and Ethical Issues (3 credits) Explores the legal and ethical responsibilities of managers. Analyzes extent to which shareholders should be allowed to exercise their legitimate economic, legal, and ethical claims on corporate managers; extent of regulation of a particular industry, individual rights of the employee and various corporate interests, and corporate responsibility to consumers, society, and conservation of natural resources and the environment.

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