NJIT News Room

Looking for something?
Search Newsroom
RSS Feed
PRESS RELEASE
Contact Information: Tanya Klein Public Relations 973-596-3433

2009 Newsmakers at NJIT

Searching for an up-and-coming newsmaker for 2009 to round-off your new year’s spotlight?  Why not take a closer look at three young, dynamic NJIT professors with a visit to “Spotlight” in the NJIT Newsroom. There you’ll find the following three winning professors with contact information so you can reach them today! 

If you’re seeking an expert on the economics of the Great Depression, put NJIT author and historian Neil M. Maher on your to call list. Maher recounts the history of one of Franklin D. Roosevelt's boldest and most successful experiments, the Civilian Conservation Corps. According to Maher, the organization was a turning point in national politics and in the emergence of modern environmentalism. Maher, an associate professor at NJIT, chairs the history department and is available for interviews.  A new and better way to predict earthquakes and avalanches may soon be available to forecasters thanks to mathematical research underway at NJIT. Using mathematical modeling, researchers are investigating how forces and pressures propagate through granular materials. Read more.

Whale sounds from thump to song have long struck a chord with NJIT humanities professor, writer and musician David Rothenberg. The rhythms so captivated the intrepid clarinetist that he spent much of last year playing interspecies duets with these melodic mammals. And now, Rothenberg's new book Thousand Mile Song: Whale Music in a Sea of Sound (Basic Books, May 1, 2008) has been named one of the ten best science and technology books for 2008 by Booklist on Line, a publication of the American Library Association. Creature lovers may recall that in 2005, Rothenberg authored the bestselling Why Birds Sing. Read more.

“Computational Homology, Jamming and Force Chains in Dense Granular Flows,” a four-year, $378,603 National Science Foundation grant has been awarded to Lou Kondic, associate professor of mathematical sciences at NJIT.  Kondic will study how the physical properties of granular materials, like sand or salt, can lead to jamming, large force fluctuations and ultimately how they can pressure a building to topple. Both earthquakes and avalanches involve similar materials and reactions. Read more.

NJIT, New Jersey's science and technology university, enrolls approximately 10,000 students pursuing bachelor's, master's and doctoral degrees in 120 programs. The university consists of six colleges: Newark College of Engineering, College of Architecture and Design, College of Science and Liberal Arts, School of Management, College of Computing Sciences and Albert Dorman Honors College. U.S. News & World Report's 2012 Annual Guide to America's Best Colleges ranked NJIT in the top tier of national research universities. NJIT is internationally recognized for being at the edge in knowledge in architecture, applied mathematics, wireless communications and networking, solar physics, advanced engineered particulate materials, nanotechnology, neural engineering and e-learning. Many courses and certificate programs, as well as graduate degrees, are available online through the Division of Continuing Professional Education.