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Contact Information: Tanya Klein Public Relations 973-596-3433

NJIT Researcher Awarded Patent for Hydrophobic, Corrosion-Resistant Coating

Sergiu M. Gorun, PhD, associate professor of chemistry at New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) www.njit.edu, was awarded a patent today for a novel composition of matter.  “Functional Coating Compositions of Perfluoroalkyl Perfluoro-Phthalocyanine Compounds” (US Patent Number 7,670,684) discloses a new self-contained subclass of molecules.  These new materials are comprised of organic scaffolds with metal centers, which can be applied as either an opaque or transparent hydrophobic coating.

“A combination of properties has been achieved based on the presence of a metal in the molecular structure without compromising the desired robust, hydrophobic features," Gorun said. “Consequently, these coatings are more versatile than previous materials since most metals can be incorporated."  The new composition avoids exposing humans to the cancerous effects of heated petroleum-based products, which may make the new compositions more environmentally acceptable than current well-known coatings. Since all carbon-hydrogen bonds have been eliminated and replaced by perfluorinated carbon chains or fluorine, the new molecules exhibit a high thermal stability as compared to petroleum-derived materials.

The coatings work by maintaining a low-energy surface that resembles a lotus leaf in its property to repel water, despite the presence of metal centers. Since water does not wet the surface, any exposed area covered by the coating will not be subject to water binding, thus preventing the onset of corrosion.

This new chemical configuration also mitigates the destructive effect of oxygen, the culprit that ages organic materials. The absence of any carbon-hydrogen bonds in NJIT’s new coating removes the pathway for oxygen to destroy the new molecules.

Interestingly, the use of certain metals in the center of the composition enables the coatings to use the sun's radiation for the photo-physical activation of oxygen from air.  Activated or singlet oxygen is good for maintaining a clean surface.  It won't destroy the robust coating, thus contributing to its overall protective effects.

The potential applications for these new materials are broad.  US Army researchers are interested in these coatings for military and commercial applications: preventing the corrosion of vehicles and related hardware as well as applying the coatings to surfaces as a self-cleaning repellent for chemical and biological contaminants.

On-going collaborative research is focused on using the materials as biocidal coatings for medical instruments or hospital walls or as an optical coating that allows surfaces to change color under the influence of electrical currents.  One industrial application includes the photocatalytic oxygenation of molecules. 

NJIT, New Jersey's science and technology university, enrolls more than 8,400 students in its six colleges.  NJIT offers bachelor's, master's and doctoral degrees in 92 degree programs, the university is known for solar physics, advanced engineered particulate materials, nanotechnology, neural engineering and e-learning.

One of the nation's leading public technological universities, New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) is a top-tier research university that prepares students to become leaders in the technology-dependent economy of the 21st century. NJIT's multidisciplinary curriculum and computing-intensive approach to education provide technological proficiency, business acumen and leadership skills. With an enrollment of more than 10,000 graduate and undergraduate students, NJIT offers small-campus intimacy with the resources of a major public research university. NJIT is a global leader in such fields as solar research, nanotechnology, resilient design, tissue engineering, and cyber-security, in addition to others. NJIT ranks 5th among U.S. polytechnic universities in research expenditures, topping $110 million, and is among the top 1 percent of public colleges and universities in return on educational investment, according to PayScale.com.