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2014 - 5 stories
2013 - 7 stories
2012 - 4 stories
2011 - 7 stories
2010 - 5 stories
2009 - 14 stories
2008 - 12 stories
2007 - 1 story
2006 - 10 stories
2005 - 6 stories
2004 - 5 stories
2003 - 7 stories
2014
Tomas Gregorio EMBA‘09, a veteran health care executive experienced in building IT networks for regional hospitals, has been appointed Senior Executive Director of Healthcare Systems Innovation at the New Jersey Innovation Institute (NJII), an NJIT corporation. >>
A substantial new grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) will enable NJIT researchers to delve more deeply into powerful, potentially destructive solar events. >>
Now deep into the scientific discovery phase of a two-year orbit, NASA's Van Allen Probes, carrying an NJIT instrument that measures the composition of the radiation belts surrounding Earth, are shedding new light on a hazardous, little-understood region of the planet's outermost atmosphere. >>
Brian Tibbs, NJIT alum and director of southeast operations for Moody Nolan, will present “The Story of the Nation's Largest Black-Owned Architecture Firm” on Feb. 27 from 6:30-7:30 p.m. in Weston Lecture Hall I. >>
A massive solar storm erupting from a giant, tumultuous sunspot is providing what physicist Andrew Gerrard calls a “beautiful opportunity” to observe and analyze a rare and powerful burst of solar radiation and particles traveling at unusually high speed toward Earth. >>
2013
U.S. News & World Report's Best Colleges 2014 Edition has once again named NJIT to the top tier of national universities for its range of undergraduate majors and master's and doctoral degrees. This year, NJIT was ranked 150th out of the 200+ institutions earning the distinction of top national universities.  NJIT also ranked 6th in the nation for ethnic diversity. >>
The U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) and the Hurricane Sandy Rebuilding Task Force teamed up to host the Hurricane Sandy Small Business Recovery and Matchmaking Summit on Aug. 7 at NJIT.  The event, first of its kind in the region since the disaster, educated and connected small businesses to commercial buyers from the private sector and federal, state and local governments. >>
Researchers at NJIT's Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) in Big Bear, CA have obtained new and remarkably detailed photos of the Sun with the New Solar Telescope (NST).  The photographs reveal never-before-seen details of solar magnetism revealed in photospheric and chromospheric features.  >>
The American Geophysical Union (AGU) has named NJIT Distinguished Professor Philip R. Goode, of Westfield, a 2013 Fellow for his seminal contributions to solar physics and to the development of a revolutionary ground-based solar telescope facility.  >>
The NJIT Board of Trustees has approved a 3.2 percent or $239 per semester tuition and mandatory fee increase for in-state undergraduate students for the 2013-2014 academic year. Total annual tuition and mandatory fees for full-time in-state students will be $15,218 for 2013-2014. Tuition and fees for out-of-state undergraduate students for the 2013-2014 academic year will increase by 4.2 percent to $28,274. >>
NJIT regrets the loss of Ian M. Ross, a president at Bell Labs who received an honorary doctorate from NJIT in 1993 and was a former member of the NJIT Board of Overseers.  >>
2012
This Sunday while you're watching this year's Emmy® Awards, here's some news.  “Engineering Ground Zero,” a production of the prominent Boston-based NOVA, was named among six titles for best documentary.  >>
Rivaling the kind of devotion reserved for rock stars, a band of space weather groupies surrounding NJIT Distinguished Research Professor Lou Lanzerotti stayed up all night into the next day to witness the long-awaited launch of Atlas V.   >>
Three high-tech companies based at NJIT's Enterprise Development Center (EDC) http://www.njit-edc.org/  took top awards at the recent 2012 Venture Conference sponsored by the New Jersey Technology Council.  >>
2011
Atam Dhawan, PhD, distinguished professor and associate dean of the Albert Dorman Honors College, was selected to represent the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBS) as a 2012-2013 Distinguished Lecturer>>
Fernando Music, principal from The Rooster Design Group in New York City, will be speaking on April 4 at 11:30 a.m. as part of the ongoing Digital Design Industry Speak Seminar Series hosted by NJIT's School of Art + Design.  >>
NJIT mourns the loss of Distinguished Professor Emeritus Stanley B. Winters, a member of the Federated Department of History faculty from 1957 to 1991 who died on Jan. 28 in Port Charlotte, Fla. >>
AT&T, Oppenheimer Funds, Motorola, Samsung, McGraw Hill Companies and the Liberty Science Center will number among the 120-plus organizations participating in the March 2, 2011 NJIT Career Fair.  >>
Marguerite Schneider, PhD, an associate professor in NJIT's School of Management, has been named treasurer of the International Association for Business and Society (IABS). >>
NJIT Distinguished Professor Philip R. Goode and the research team at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) have reported new insights into the small-scale dynamics of the Sun's photosphere. >>
2010
Why sunspots are a strong source of radio emissions and what information those emissions carry will be the focus of an invited talk by NJIT Research Professor Jeongwoo Lee tomorrow at the International Astronomical Union Symposium on the Physics of Sun and Star Spots in Ventura, CA.  The event numbers among the top gatherings in the U.S. for people studying sunspots and related phenomena.    >>
NJIT Distinguished Professor Philip R. Goode and the Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) team have achieved “first light” using a deformable mirror in what is called adaptive optics at BBSO. An image of a sunspot was published Aug. 23, 2010 on the website of Ciel et l'Espace, as the photo of the day. >>
Jeongwoo Lee, PhD, a research professor in the department of physics, will deliver an invited talk, "Sunspots at Centimeter Wavelengths" on August 22-26 at the International Astronomical Union Symposium on Physics of Sun and Star Spots in Ventura, California. >>
Philip R. Goode, PhD, distinguished professor of physics at NJIT and director of Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) in California, has received a three-year, $2.4 million National Science Foundation (NSF) grant to improve the optics at BBSO.  >>

Vigil for Haiti at NJIT

January 21, 2010
A vigil to offer hope and support for the people of Haiti both locally and abroad was held yesterday in the Jim Wise Theater at NJIT. The program included opening remarks from students and faculty members of Haitian descent as well as comments from students representing the Caribbean Student Society (CARIBSO), the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE), and the New Jersey Haitian Student Association. View the Star-Ledger photo gallery.   View photos on NJIT's Flickr site. >>
2009
NJIT Distinguished Professor of Physics Dale E. Gary will guide visitors on a journey to the center of the galaxy on Dec. 11, 2009 at the Cooperative Extension Services, Warren County. >>
Distinguished Professor of Physics Philip R. Goode will discuss "The New Solar Telescope in Big Bear" at a Physics Department Seminar on Dec. 7, 12 noon-1 p.m. (11:30 a.m. tea time) in Tiernan Rm. 407. >>
NJIT researchers are at work on many scientific and technological frontiers. The National Science Foundation has recently provided support that totals nearly $4.3 million for the diverse efforts of the following investigators under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. >>
A drug to stop bleeding during a brain injury and a bed that will prevent bedsores are among the scientific discoveries at NJIT that received earlier this week more than a million dollars in funding from the New Jersey Commission on Science and Technology. >>
The K2MFF Amateur Radio Club at NJIT will be volunteering on Sunday, Nov. 1 at the 2009 New York City Marathon. Students will help with logistics, runner drop-out and medical communications as well as gain experience communicating at a public service event.  >>
During the next decade, solar physicists will learn more than they might have dreamed possible about the Sun, thanks to current technologies that have advanced the capacity of ground-based and space-based instruments.   All the more reason for the excitement on Oct. 3, 2009 when NJIT formally dedicates the new solar telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO), CA. >>
NJIT humanities professor, author and clarinetist David Rothenberg will appear in the upcoming PBS documentary “The Music Instinct” airing June 24, 2009 on Channel 13 and affiliate stations throughout the state and the NYC region. He is also a participant through this week in the second annual World Science Festival in New York City. Various scientific luminaries in this week's events include Lisa Randall, E.O. Wilson, Brian Greene, and celebrity science fans like Harrison Ford and Alan Alda. >>
NJIT's new 1.6-meter clear aperture solar telescope—the largest of its kind in the world—is now operational.  The unveiling of this remarkable instrument—said to be the pathfinder for all future, large ground-based telescopes—could not have come at a more auspicious moment for science.  This year marks the 400th anniversary of Galileo's telescope that he used to demonstrate that sunspots are indeed on the Sun.  >>
Many seniors who will graduate at NJIT's commencement ceremony tomorrow (9 a.m.-noon) at the Prudential Center are looking forward to the big day but not just for the sheepskin. They will look forward just as much to their starting dates at plum jobs with starting salaries upwards of $60,000.  >>
Many seniors who will graduate at NJIT's upcoming May 16, 2009, commencement ceremony (9 a.m.-noon) at the Prudential Center are looking forward to the big day but not just for the sheepskin.  They are looking forward just as much to their start dates at plum jobs with starting salaries upwards of $60,000. Grads attribute their success to keeping their studies focused on science, technology, engineering and/or math.  >>
Two NJIT undergraduates will attend an elite 11-week paid summer internship program sponsored by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg, MD. Some 150 students from universities throughout the nation will participate in the prestigious program which involves a rigorous acceptance process.  >>
Philip R. Goode, PhD, distinguished professor of physics at NJIT, will be inducted tonight into the New Jersey High-Tech Hall of Fame. The Hall of Fame was created in 1999 to recognize the best and the brightest New Jersey has to offer by honoring the achievements of life science and high-tech research and business leaders, educators, and government officials who have demonstrated exemplary work in innovative products and therapies.  Sponsors of the event are BioNJ, HINJ, and TechAmerica. >>
2008
NJIT's College of Computing Sciences is presenting a seminar entitled, "In Pursuit of Unintended Consequences and Other Thoughts on NJIT's Website Strategy", on Dec. 3, 2:30-3:30 p.m. in the Guttenberg Information Technologies Center Rm. 3710.  >>
If you are a student and you are considering attending NJIT, check out NJIT's Career Development Center (CDC) http://www.njit.edu/cds/ with the mission to help students find great jobs. Hundreds of top companies from around the region come to CDC's biannual fairs to recruit. CDC also helps students find internships and part-time jobs (co-ops) at these firms. >>
David Reibstein, PhD, associate dean and Lois Hulin, assistant dean for recruitment at NJIT's Albert Dorman Honors College, addressed questions from students today at the Honors Open House. Sponsored by NJIT's Department of Residence Life, the open house presented new developments in the Honors Living/Learning Communities, located on the fifth and sixth floors of Redwood Hall.  >>
NJIT physics professor Andrew Gerrard hopes by the end of October to be able to peer through what will be the second largest optical telescope east of Texas. Under his direction, a 1.2-meter diameter, fully-steerable Itek optical telescope will soon be installed far from city lights atop Jenny Jump Mountain, Hope.  >>
Alice E. White, vice president, Alcatel-Lucent Bell Labs North America, will be the keynote speaker at NJIT's annual University Convocation on Sept. 3, 2008, 3 p.m. at NJIT. A reception follows. >>
Three architects in training from NJIT representing the The Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. of Morristown received honorable mention in the 2008 Millennium School International Design Competition based in the Philippines. The team placed fourth among the top seven winners in the competition, which attracted 120 entries from designers worldwide. At left: Brian D.B. Novello, a third-year student at the New Jersey School of Architecture who has interned as an architectural designer at the company's Morristown office since 2005; Muhammad H. Hussain '02 LEED AP, an architectural designer based in the Houston office; and team leader Benjamin P. Bakas ‘03, LEED AP, an architectural designer in Morristown. >>
Salman Naqvi, an electrical engineering major at NJIT, has been been awarded the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Ernest F. Hollings Scholarship for 2008. Naqvi is working with NJIT Physics Professor Andrew Gerrard on developing a compact molecular-aerosol Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) system that detects the gravity waves above the Newark and New York City metropolitan areas.  >>
The NJIT Board of Overseers and NJIT President Robert A. Altenkirch presented yesterday to Philip R. Goode, PhD the first NJIT Excellence in Research Prize and Medal. Goode, who has led a five-year project to build the world's most capable 1.6-meter solar telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory in Big Bear Lake, CA, is distinguished professor of physics and director of the Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research, which manages the observatory.  >>
"Investigating How Feedback to a Descending Projection Neuron Influences Rhythmic Pattern Generation in the Target Network: A Modeling" is the topic of a Mathematical Biology Seminar by Nickolas Kintos of the Department of Mathematics at Fordham University. The seminar will be held on March 25 at 4 p.m. in Cullimore Hall, Room 611.  >>
During the next decade, solar physicists will learn more than they have dreamed possible about the Sun, thanks to current technologies that have advanced the capacity of land-based instruments. Such advancements will be the focus of a talk on March 26, 2008 by noted NJIT solar astronomer Philip R. Goode, PhD.  >>
The first NJIT Excellence in Research Prize and Medal will be awarded to Philip R. Goode, PhD, distinguished professor of physics by the NJIT Board of Overseers and NJIT President Robert A. Altenkirch on March 26, 2008.  >>
An electrical and computer engineering junior at NJIT was named to the second team of the 19th annual all-USA college academic program sponsored by the publication USA TODAY. Mohammad Farhan Haider Naqvi, of Kearny, received the honor based upon an application he submitted last fall listing his accomplishments to date.   >>
2007
"There is no dominant team in this year's baseball playoffs, at least in the first round," said Bruce Bukiet, associate professor of mathematical sciences at NJIT concerning the Major League Baseball Division series. According to Bukiet's mathematical model, the Cubs have a 62 percent chance of advancing to the National League Championship Series, while the Red Sox have a 60 percent chance of advancing to the American League Championship Series. >>
2006
New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) will make available live color photos illustrating the rare Transit of Mercury. Big Bear Solar Observatory, Big Bear, Calif., managed and operated by NJIT, will begin capturing these images at 2 p.m. E.S.T. using its 6 inch (15 centimeter) Singer Full-Disk Telescope. The telescope will use a special filter to look at chromosphere, a layer in the solar atmosphere about a thousand miles above the sun's visible surface. >>
Bogdan Georgescu, PhD, of Siemens Research Labs will discuss "Database-Guided Segmentation of Anatomical Structures with Complex Appearance" on Oct. 4, 2:30-3:30 p.m., in the Guttenberg Information Technologies Center, Rm. 4415. >>
If you're still wondering why Pluto is no longer a planet, head over Friday night to the weekly meeting of the Amateur Astronomers, Inc. in Cranford. Astrophysicist Dale Gary, PhD, professor and chair of the physics department at NJIT will decode the mystery of recent events in Prague. Gary speaks at 8:30 p.m. at the William Miller Sperry Observatory at Union County College. >>
Starting this fall, students at New Jersey City University (NJCU) can begin working on master's degrees in computer science or information systems from NJIT, while completing their bachelor's degrees at NJCU. NJIT and NJCU signed an agreement to offer the new degree program yesterday at NJCU. “Inter-institutional cooperation between NJCU and NJIT will have a positive impact on students interested in computer science and information systems, who in five years can have both bachelor's and master's degrees in these fields,” said NJIT President Robert Altenkirch. “The joint degree will be a great advantage to these students both intellectually as well as when they enter the job market.” >>
Starting this fall, William Paterson University (WPU) students can start working on master's degrees in computer science or math from NJIT while completing their bachelor's degrees at WPU. “This new agreement will allow William Paterson students and alumni as well as professionals who live or work near the WPU campus to advance their educations without leaving their backyards,” said Gale Tenen Spak, associate vice president of Continuing and Distance Learning Education at NJIT. >>
Atam P. Dhawan, PhD, professor and chair of the department of electrical and computer engineering at NJIT, was named the conference chair of  the 28th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBS). The event will be held August 30-Sept. 3 in New York City. >>
How the study of Earthshine continues to elucidate climate variables and how the use of Earthshine data may help to search for advanced life on distant planets, will be the foci of an upcoming panel discussion in Baltimore led by solar physicist Philip R. Goode, PhD, and a panel of researchers. Goode, distinguished professor at NJIT and director of Big Bear Solar Observatory, Calif., leads the talk on May 23 at 10 a.m. during the 2006 joint assembly of six geophysical societies. >>
Three high schools took top awards during a website-design contest held March 14 at NJIT. Twenty-one schools and 150 students from the metropolitan region competed in the contest, sponsored by NJIT's Department of Information Systems. A team from Henry Hudson Regional High School (at left) took first place for designing a prototype for a teaching website. >>
Matt Gosser, an adjunct instructor of architecture at New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), will be honored by the Newark Preservation and Landmarks Committee for making furniture, sculpture and art from objects he salvaged at the former Pabst Brewery. >>
Less sunlight reaching the Earth's surface has not translated into cooler temperatures, according to a team of solar physicists at NJIT. The scientists have observed that the amount of light reflected by Earth has increased since 2000. “Our findings have significant implications for the study of climate change,” said Philip R. Goode, PhD, principal investigator and distinguished professor of physics at NJIT. >>
2005
One day last year, Matt Gosser, who teaches architectural graphics at NJIT, read that the Pabst Brewery was being demolished. But when Gosser walked inside the brewery, he found a treasure trove of objects: original architectural drawings; engineering drawings; machine parts; and metal work. Sixteen months later, the New Jersey School of Architecture (NJSOA) gallery at NJIT is hosting “AR+CHAEOLOGY: The Death and After-life of the Pabst Brewery,” an exhibit featuring sculpture, furniture and collages that Gosser made from objects he found in the brewery. “We feel that Gosser's exhibit is historic and reflects an important part of Newark's history and economic development,” said James Dyer, associate dean at NJSOA. >>
Students from high schools in Fair Lawn, Madison and Hackensack took first, second and third-place prizes in a computer-programming contest held at New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT). Nearly 40 high-school teams from across the state competed in the contest, which was sponsored by the computer science department at NJIT. >>
Nagi Vedati of the IBM Software Group will discuss the features and functions of the IBM Testing Solution at the monthly meeting of the NJ-Metro WebSphere User Group (WUG) on May 26, 6-9 p.m., Campus Center Room 240. Sponsored by NJIT's e-business Laboratory, the group is the only university-based WUG and helps members to identify learning and training opportunities. The meeting is open to all and is free of charge. Details and online registration are available on the WebSphere User Group website. Contact: Stephane Gagnon at gagnon@njit.edu>>
Tagged: ibm, websphere
Roland Barcia of the IBM Software Group will discuss "Enterprise Messaging with the Service Integration Bus Inside WebSphere Application Server Version 6" at the monthly meeting of the NJ-Metro WebSphere User Group on May 12, 2005, 6-9 p.m., Campus Center Room 240. Sponsored by NJIT's e-business Laboratory, the meeting is open to all and is free of charge. Details and online registration are available on the WebSphere User Group website. Contact: Stephane Gagnon at gagnon@njit.edu. >>
Muneeb Khan and Richard Irving of Compware will speak on the topic "From UML to J2EE Using OptimalJ and WebSphere" at the monthly meeting of the NJ-Metro WebSphere User Group (WUG) on April 27, 2005, 6-9 p.m., Campus Center Room 240. Sponsored by NJIT's e-business Laboratory, the group is the only university-based WUG and helps members to identify learning and training opportunities. The meeting is open to all and is free of charge. Details and online registration are available on the WebSphere User Group website. Contact: Stephane Gagnon at gagnon@njit.edu >>
Jim Bernstein of Solstice Software will speak on the topic of "Testing Process Integration with Integra Enterprise" at the monthly meeting of the NJ-Metro WebSphere User Group (WUG) on March 16, 2005, 6 p.m.-9 p.m., Campus Center Room 240. Sponsored by NJIT's e-business Laboratory, the group is the only university-based WUG and helps members to identify learning and training opportunities. The meeting is open to all and is free of charge. Details and online registration are available on the WebSphere User Group website. Contact: Stephanie Gagnon, School of Management, at gagnon@njit.edu. >>
2004
Dolcey Chaplin  likes to say that she helps put New Jersey to work.  Chaplin, an attorney by profession, is the executive director of the Defense Procurement Technical Assistance Center (DPTAC) at New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT). The Center is a free source of practical education and useful assistance for the New Jersey business community to help obtain government contracts. >>
NJIT signed an agreement to fund the Defense Procurement Technical Assistance Center (DPTAC), a free source of practical education and useful assistance for the New Jersey business community to help obtain government contracts. >>
A group of 20 Albert Dorman Honors College (ADHC) Scholars visited Washington, DC on March 19 and 20, 2004 at the special invitation of Congressman Donald M. Payne. The students were accompanied by three ADHC staff members, including Dr. David Reibstein, associate dean; Shane Williamson, assistant dean for academics; and Lois Chipepo, assistant to the dean. “The students had a more comprehensive and personal visit than that of the ordinary tourist,” said Dr. Reibstein.  “In addition to insight into the workings of the federal government, the students also learned about the many career opportunities in government for graduates with technical degrees.” >>
Scientists who monitor Earth's reflectance by measuring the moon's earthshine have observed unexpectedly large climate fluctuations during the past two decades.  By combining eight years of earthshine data with nearly twenty years of partially overlapping satellite cloud data, they have found a gradual decline in the Earth's reflectance that became sharper in the last part of the 1990's, perhaps associated with the accelerated global warming in recent years.  Surprisingly, the declining reflectance reversed completely in the past three years.  Such changes, which are not understood, seem to be a natural variability of the Earth's clouds. >>
Despite what you might have read lately in the news about earth dimming, researchers at NJIT's Big Bear Observatory in California have uncovered evidence to the contrary. Their findings, to be reported in the May 28 issue of Science, suggest that earth is brightening. The research combines observations of the ghostly glow of light reflected from earth onto the dark side of the moon, known as earthshine, with NASA cloud data from satellites. The scientists suggest that observing earthshine offers a simple method for monitoring climate change and variations in cloud cover. >>
2003
New Jersey Institute of Technology/Bell Labs physicist Louis Lanzerotti was part of international team that studied the unquiet sun when it was most active and found some surprises. >>
Big Bear Solar Observatory reopened Monday November 3 after a six-day shutdown cause by California's wildfires.  Mandatory evacuation mean the center's director Philip Goode had to leave his home on Big Bear Lake and return to New Jersey, where the observatory is managed by the New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) in Newark. But no harm came to observatory staff, property, or equipment. >>

MEDIA ADVISORY

October 28, 2003
A major solar flare, possibly the second largest ever recorded, erupted today at 6:30 a.m. The intensity of the flare has sent a space storm careening towards the Earth. If the storm's magnetic field is in the right direction – opposite that of the earth – it could cause problems when it reaches us Wednesday. It could knock out power grids, upset satellites and disrupt GPS signals. More benignly, if the weather is clear, people who peer into the northern sky on Wednesday night could see a shimmer of lights known as an aurora,” says NJIT physicist Dale Gary. >>
Observe Mars under the stars with the New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) Astronomy Club, Aug. 26, and possibly Aug. 27, at 7:30 p.m., on the NJIT campus. >>
Newark, N.J.--The "weather" in space may have just gotten a bit more predictable. Using new digital equipment, a team of NJIT researchers has gotten a better look at the surface of the sun and what happens to it both before and during solar flares. Working at NJIT's Big Bear Solar Observatory in California, a team led by physics professor Haimin Wang, Ph.D., produced a series of new images. They show for the first time that rapid changes in the magnetic fields emanating from the sun's surface are associated with flares and mass ejections of energy from the sun's corona. These eruptions are typically near areas known as "sunspots", which appear dark through telescopes because they have a lower surface temperature than that of their surrounding surface. "This is good news for the researchers of space weather, because our information will enable scientists in industry and government to better understand and predict the likelihood of flares and prepare for and mitigate adverse consequences," says Wang. Wang is scheduled to present the findings this week at the American Astronomical Society's solar physics division meeting at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD. Solar flares are violent eruptions that send electromagnetic radiation into space, ultimately causing problems on earth by disrupting the atmosphere. The flare-ups can interfere with satellite-based communications and television and radio broadcasts. That can mean disruptions in cell-phone service and flight communications. Wang and colleagues produced images showing how the sun's surface changed during an after a flare. The research should enable scientists to predict when solar flares will erupt, how disruptive they will be, and how long they will last, he says. Crucial to producing the images was a new imaging system known as a "digital magnetograph system" built by NJIT doctoral student Tom Spirock. The team's work was also supported by grants from NASA, the National Science Foundation, and the Office of Naval Research. >>
A $440,000 research grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) Early Career Development Award Program has been awarded to a professor at New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) to build the brains of a solar telescope. >>
Louis J. Lanzerotti, Ph.D., a prominent New Jersey-based physicist and member of the National Academy of Engineering and the International Academy of Astronautics, has been appointed distinguished research professor of physics at New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT). >>