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Stories Tagged with "career award"

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2013 - 1 story
2010 - 1 story
2009 - 1 story
2008 - 1 story
2004 - 2 stories
2013
The NJIT Research Committee will host the NSF CAREER Award Workshop on April 3 from 11:30 – 2:30 p.m. in 112 Eberhart Hall.  The objectives of the workshop are to provide an open forum for the newly hired faculty members to interact with the NSF CAREER awardees on campus and help them jump-start their CAREER proposal preparation and submission.  >>
2010
A customer at an Apple store asks for the latest iPhone in black, but then suddenly changes his preference to white when he sees everyone else buying black . . .  Although the child knows she shouldn't press the big red button, she finds her hand inching toward it. . . . In some cultures, young men and women who decide to marry know that they will see each other in person for the first time on their wedding day.  How did these people make their choices? How do any of us make vital and mundane choices? >>
2009
2008
Edgardo Farinas, PhD, an assistant professor in the department of chemistry and environmental science at NJIT, has received a National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER award for his project "New Tools for High-Throughput Screening of Protein Libraries: Engineering Metalloproteins Displayed on Bacillus Subtilis Spores." The prestigious career award recognizes teacher-scholars most likely to become the academic leaders of the 21st century. >>
2004
A young female African-American professor at New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) was recognized today by President Bush for research showing that adult stem cells could help patients suffering from spinal cord injuries, bone and cartilage damage and related diseases. >>
Treena Livingston Arinzeh, PhD, assistant professor of biomedical engineering at NJIT, received the 2003 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers today during a ceremony at the White House. The Presidential Award is the highest national honor for young scientists and engineers. “I'm very proud to receive this prestigious presidential award,” Arinzeh said. “The award shows that my research in stem-cell based regeneration has great potential, and that it's essential to the scientific education of students, both in college and in high school.” >>