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2014 - 1 story
2007 - 1 story
2006 - 1 story
2005 - 1 story
2004 - 2 stories
2014
Rayon Williams, a doctoral student in chemical engineering, received second-place honors for his oral presentation at the  National Society of Black Engineers 40th Annual Convention Technical Research Exhibition competition in Nashville, Tenn. >>
2007
Two graduate mechanical engineering students at NJIT saw their careers blossom upon receiving recognition at an aeronautical research conference in Baltimore. One research project by Ervin Beloni, a master's degree candidate, would someday enable airplanes to fly longer distances without refueling; the other project by Swati Umbrajkar, a doctoral candidate, would someday enable solid propellants and explosives to work more effectively. >>
Tagged: edward dreizin
2006
“What I think they were talking about today were liquid explosives based on nitroglycerines,” said Daniel Watts. Watts, a professor in the department of chemistry and environmental science at NJIT, is among five NJIT scientists and specialists available through Aug. 14, 2006, to discuss on the phone or in person the science and more of the thwarted terrorist plot in London. >>
2005

KUDOS - September 2005

September 01, 2005
NJIT has promoted one faculty member to the rank of distinguished professor, five to the rank of professor, one to the rank of associate professor with tenure, and two received tenure without change in rank. PROMOTION TO DISTINGUISHED PROFESSOR Zeynep Celik, New Jersey School of Architecture, joined NJIT in September of 1990 as an associate professor, and was promoted to Professor of Architecture in 1996. She received her Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley in 1984 and began her academic career at Columbia University. She is a well-known and respected scholar in the field of architectural and urban history. Her long list of highly regarded publications studies the cities of Ottoman and French Empires in the late-nineteenth and early twentieth centuries from a comparative and interdisciplinary perspective. She was the editor of the Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians from 2000 to 2003. Her outstanding scholarship has been recognized with prestigious honors, including three awards in 2004: the Guggenheim Fellowship, the American Council of Learned Societies Fellowship, and the Council of American Overseers Research Center Fellowship. She lectures throughout the world and has held visiting professorships at Harvard University, Barnard College, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and most recently at the Ecole Des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales in Paris. She serves the university and the profession on a variety of important committees, including the University's Promotion and Tenure Committee. Promotion to Professor Michael Bieber, Department of Information Systems, came to NJIT in 1993 as an assistant professor, and was promoted to Associate Professor with tenure in 1999. Previously, he has been on the faculty at Boston College (Carroll School of Management) and New York University (Stern School of Business). His Ph.D. was awarded by the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania in 1990. His research has been strongly funded throughout his career by NSF, and involves making learning more effective and concerns hypermedia, digital libraries, educational research, software engineering, the World Wide Web and Web Engineering, and virtual communities. He has been extremely active in professional service and is the associate editor of three scholarly journals. He has shown leadership and accomplishment in his teaching, developed a commitment to research in education and learning, and has been nominated twice for excellence in teaching awards by the IS Department. He currently serves as Acting Chair for his department, and as co-Director of the Collaborative Hypermedia Research Laboratory. Amitabha Bose, Department of Mathematical Sciences, joined NJIT in 1996 as assistant professor and was promoted to associate professor and awarded tenure in 2001. He received his Ph.D. in 1994 from Brown University, and served on the faculty at Boston University and at the Polytechnic Preparatory School in Brooklyn before coming to NJIT. He is an accomplished scholar and a recognized leader who has significantly affected the development of the research and education agendas for his department. His primary research interests are in the area of Dynamical Systems with a specialty in geometric singular perturbation analysis of problems in mathematical neurosciences, and he has received strong support for his research and education projects from NSF. Dr. Bose's teaching is exceptional - he is a fine lecturer and a successful mentor of undergraduate and graduate students - and he has received teaching awards from the department and the Honors College. He has also started an undergraduate training program to inspire young mathematicians to become interested in biological programs and young biologists to recognize the usefulness of mathematical approaches to their field. Dr. Bose serves as the Director of Undergraduate Studies since 2001 and is a member of the departmental curriculum committee and several university committees. Boris Khusid, Department of Mechanical Engineering, joined NJIT as an associate professor in 1998 and was granted tenure in 2002. He has a Ph.D. in Thermal Sciences and Engineering from Heat and Mass Transfer Institute, Academy of Science of Belarus, Minsk, USSR (1975), a D.S. in Thermal Sciences & Engineering from the Council of the Ministers of the USSR, Moscow (1985), and Professor in Thermal Sciences & Engineering from the Department of Education of the USSR, Moscow (1991). Before coming to NJIT, he had been a noted scientist in Russia, and had served as a Levich Institute research associate at the City College of the City University of New York. His research is in the area of physicochemical hydrodynamics of phenomena governed by the interaction of fluid flows, electro-magnetic fields, heat and mass transfer, and chemical reactions. He has received funding from many agencies, including NSF, DARPA, ONR, and the Keck Foundation. His work has applications for microfluidics, homeland security (e.g., biosensing) and nanotechnology. He has published 127 papers in highly selective peer-reviewed journals and 4 books, and he has organized many workshops and sessions on electro-hydrodynamics at American Society of Mechanical Engineering International Congresses (2002-2004) and International and U.S. National Congress of Theoretical and Applied Mathematics (2002-2004). He is a member of several committees of the American Society of Mechanical Engineering. He makes strong contributions to teaching in undergraduate and graduate education, and has involved undergraduate students in research. His teaching evaluations are very good, and he has developed a new course in nanoscale materials characterization. He has advised several MS and PhD students in their thesis work, and one of his students has received a national award. Michael Siegel, Department of Mathematical Sciences, is an extremely creative and influential researcher, who has made significant contributions with real impact in the mathematical sciences. He has a Ph.D. in Mathematics from the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, 1989. He joined NJIT in 1995 and was promoted to associate professor with tenure in 1998. His recent work in the areas of interfacial fluid dynamics and singularities is always at the cutting edge and has opened up new and productive lines of investigation. His research has been funded through several NSF programs, and he has notably served as Principal Investigator for an important NSF-funded Focus Research Group on singularity formation in 3-D Euler flow. He is very effective in the classroom, as well as in curriculum and course development at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. Not only is he a leader in his chosen profession, but he is also a role model for younger faculty members as he has taken leadership roles in shaping the future of the department and of the Center for Applied Mathematics and Statistics, his department, and NJIT. Pushpendra Singh, Department of Mechanical Engineering, joined NJIT as assistant professor in 1996 and was promoted to associate professor with tenure in 2001. His Ph.D. was awarded in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Minnesota in 1991. Before coming to NJIT, he was a post-doctoral researcher at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and a member of the technical staff at Los Alamos National Laboratory. His current research interests fall into three areas: the direct numerical simulations of multiphase fluids, the fluid dynamics of two fluid interfaces, and the modeling of biological materials. His research has been funded by NSF, ONR, state agencies, and industry. Dr. Singh has taught a wide variety of graduate and undergraduate courses, some of which he developed, and he is appreciated as a fine teacher with a commitment to continuous improvement and innovation. He serves on several departmental and university committees, and has been actively involved in advising and recruitment. PROMOTION TO ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR WITH TENURE I. Joga Rao, Department of Mechanical Engineering, joined NJIT in December of 1999 as an assistant professor. Dr. Rao's Ph.D. was awarded by Texas A&M University in 1999. His research is in the areas of continuum mechanics and constitutive modeling. He is currently investigating modeling the mechanics of growth in biological tissues, mechanics of crystallization in polymers, shape memory polymers and the mechanics of creep in single crystal super alloys. His research has been funded by the National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy. Dr. Rao has developed two new graduate courses, and is active in teaching undergraduate courses as well. He is a dedicated teacher, and is the recipient of the Newark College of Engineering Excellence in Teaching award for 2005. In addition, the department has nominated him for an Excellence in Graduate Instruction teaching award. Dr. Rao has served at the national level on the Board of Directors of the Polymer Analysis Division of the Society of Plastics Engineers and he is a member of the Constitutive Equations Committee of the Applied Mechanics Division of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. He has organized and chaired numerous sessions and symposia at various conferences. He also serves on several university and departmental committees. TENURE WITHOUT CHANGE IN RANK Artur Czumaj, Department of Computer Science, began his career at NJIT in January of 2000 as an associate professor without tenure. He previously was an assistant professor at the University of Paderborn (Germany) from which he received his Ph.D. in 1995 and the Habilitation (second doctorate) in 1999. His main research interest is in theoretical computer science, focusing on the design and analysis of algorithms - this work has been funded by NSF grants. He has been published in some of the most prestigious conferences in theoretical computer science and in many of the prestigious journals in the field. He has been teaching at both the undergraduate and graduate levels and has developed extensive Web-based notes for his courses. His student evaluations are positive. He has served on several important departmental committees and is a member of the editorial boards of two scholarly journals. Edward Dreizin, Department of Mechanical Engineering, came to NJIT as a research professor in 1999, became associate professor in 2001, and was promoted to the rank of Professor in 2004. He completed his doctoral degree in Applied Physics in 1992 at Odessa University (Ukraine). Prior to his joining NJIT, he spent six years as a research scientist in industry. His research is in the area of energetic materials and metal combustion. He has developed a mechanical alloying technology for the synthesis of nano-structured energetic materials and established laboratory facilities for the characterization and testing of those materials. His research has been supported by the Department of Defense (Army, Navy, ONR, DTRA), NASA, NSF and industry. He has developed two new graduate courses at NJIT, and is active in teaching upper division undergraduate courses. He is committed to integrating current approaches and methods, as well as research into the curriculum. Regarding service to the academic and professional communities, Dr. Dreizin has been active as a reviewer of NSF and NASA proposals and for some of the best journals in his field. >>
2004
New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) has promoted one faculty member to the rank of distinguished professor, five to the rank of professor, and another five to the rank of associate professor with tenure. Three faculty members have also received tenure without a change in their titles. (Editor's Note: Here is a brief biography, along with hometowns, of the faculty members who received promotions.) >>
PROMOTION TO DISTINGUISHED PROFESSOR Haimin Wang, professor of physics, joined NJIT in September of 1995 as an assistant professor.  He received a PhD in astrophysics from California Institute of Technology in 1988.  He is one of the most prolific researchers at NJIT having published more than 100 papers in refereed journals, more than 70 since joining NJIT. He has played a key role in the Center for Solar Terrestrial Research. He was the recipient of the US NSF CAREER award in 1997 and the Chinese NSF Distinguished Scholar Award in 2003.  He is leading two important international projects: Global Halpha Network to observe the sun round-the-clock and Information Technology Research for Space Weather Prediction. PROMOTION TO PROFESSOR Robert Barat of the Otto York Department of Chemical Engineering has been at NJIT since joining in January 1990 as an assistant professor. He has built a solid body of research in combustion and applied optics. His current research is in the area of homeland defense. His work is known and respected among his peers. He has an excellent record of teaching, having also developed several courses in the department. He was awarded the Newark College of Engineering award for excellence in interdisciplinary teaching in 2003. He received his PhD in chemical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1990.  Edward Dreizin, mechanical engineering, came to NJIT as a research professor in 1999 and became associate professor in 2001. Prior to his joining NJIT, he was a research scientist at AeroChem Research Labs at Princeton, NJ. He completed his doctoral degree in applied physics at Odessa University, Ukraine, in 1992. His research is in the area of energetic materials and metal combustion. He has developed a mechanical alloying technology for the synthesis of nano-structured and nano-composite energetic materials and established laboratory facilities for their characterization and testing. Dana Knox of the Otto York Department of Chemical Engineering received his PhD in Chemical Engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 1982. He joined NJIT in 1983 as an Assistant Professor. Dana has been designated as one of NJIT's Master Teachers in recognition of his excellence in teaching, and has received numerous other awards for teaching and service. He has also been the recipient of the Franzosini Award from IUPAC in recognition of his continued involvement with the activities of the Subcommittee on Solubility and Equilibrium Data. His primary research interest is in the area of thermodynamics of fluids and fluid mixtures, and he was the main plenary speaker at the 11th International Symposium on Solubility Phenomena in Portugal in July.  His service has been widespread both to the profession and to the university.   He recently joined the Provost's office as Interim Associate Provost. David Rothenberg, department of humanities, joined NJIT in 1992 as an assistant professor. He has a PhD in philosophy from Boston University in 1991. His research is in the field of environmental philosophy and philosophy of technology and music. He is the founding editor of the Terra Nova book series from MIT Press which have brought recognition to the university. He is the author of numerous books, including Hand's End: Technology and the Limits of Nature, Sudden Music, Always the Mountains, and the upcoming Why Birds Sing, to be published in Spring 2005 by Basic Books. Raj S. Sodhi of the department of mechanical engineering has research interests in the area of mechanical design with applications to mechanisms, manufacturing systems, medical devices, and multi-life cycle design. He began at NJIT in 1986 as an associate professor, having served as an assistant professor at Wichita State University. He served as Director of Manufacturing Programs at NJIT from 1990 to 1994.  He received the Society of Manufacturing Engineering, University Lead Award in 1994 in recognition of leadership and excellence in the application and development of computer integrated manufacturing. He is past Chairman of the SME University Lead Awards Committee.  He received the NJIT Excellence in Teaching Award for Graduate Instruction in 2001.  He also received the N. Watrous Procter & Gamble Award from the Society of Applied Mechanisms and Robotics for significant contributions to the science of mechanisms and robotics in 1995 and Ralph R. Teetor New Engineering Educator Award of the Society  of Automotive Engineers in 1986. His PhD is in mechanical engineering from the University of Houston in 1980. PROMOTION TO ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR WITH TENURE Janice Daniel, civil and environmental engineering, joined NJIT as an assistant professor in 1999 after having spent fours years at Georgia Tech. She has established a solid research identity in the areas of traffic adaptation control and transportation safety, receiving an impressive $1.6 million in external funding that includes two grants from NSF. Her research has proved critical to solving both regional and national transportation problems. She has also been very active in service to her profession, serving on several national committees. She has a PhD from Texas A&M University (1995). Alexandros Gerbessiotis of the department of computer science received the PhD in computer science from Harvard University in 1993. He joined NJIT as an assistant professor in 1998 after having spent several years as a postdoctoral scholar at the Oxford University Computing Laboratory. His research deals with the design, analysis, and implementation of latency-tolerant algorithms for parallel computers. His work has advanced the Bulk-Synchronous Parallel (BSP) model of computation, first proposed by his thesis advisor L. G. Valiant who is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, to such a stage that Dr Gerbessiotis is now widely recognized as a central researcher in latency-tolerant parallel computing. Thomas Juliano, engineering technology, joined the department as an assistant professor in January 1999, after many years as an adjunct. He does research in both education and scientific areas, and brings his 25 years of industrial experience into the classroom. He has been principal investigator, or co-principal investigator, on several infrastructure research projects that are associated with pipelines and sponsored by the USEPA, US Army Industrial Ecology Center, and NJDOT. He has a doctor of engineering science degree in mechanical engineering from NJIT (1979). Symeon Papavassiliou of the department of electrical and computer engineering has a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Polytechnic University (1996). His research interests are in resource allocation for wireless and high-speed networks, mobile radio communication system design, mobile ad hoc networks and sensors, network management and security, and performance evaluation of communication protocols.  He joined NJIT in 1999 as an assistant professor.  From 1996 to 1999, he was a senior technical staff member at AT&T Laboratories in Middletown, New Jersey.  Dr. Papavassiliou was awarded the Best Paper Award in INFOCOM'94, the "AT&T Division Recognition and Achievement Award" in 1997, and the National Science Foundation (NSF) Career Award in 2003.  David Washington, engineering technology, is a registered professional engineer.  He has worked on computational solutions in the area of civil engineering—from the micro-mechanical behavior of geological materials to freight modal systems.  He joined NJIT in 1997 as an assistant professor.  He has an excellent record of teaching and service to the professional and university communities.  His PhD is in civil engineering from NJIT (1996). TENURE WITHOUT CHANGE IN RANK Ljubinko (Lou) Kondic of the department of mathematical sciences joined NJIT as an assistant professor in 1999 and was promoted to associate professor in 1992.  His Ph.D. is in physics from the City University of New York (1995). He has held postdoctoral and faculty appointments in applied mathematics. His research spans three main areas:  thin film flows, granular materials, and sonoluminescence. In each of these areas, he has made solid, timely, research contributions. Rajiv Mehta joined the School of Management as associate professor for Marketing in 1999 after having served on the faculties of the College of Business Administration at Loyola University, New Orleans and Richard Stockton College of New Jersey.   His research interests are in the areas of sales management, marketing channels, and global marketing.  His research has appeared in the European Journal of Marketing, Business Horizons, Journal of Personal Selling and Sales Management, Journal of Business to Business Marketing, Journal of Business and Industrial Marketing, Journal of Global Marketing, Industrial Marketing Management, Journal of Managerial Issues, and Journal of Services Marketing.  He has worked diligently to develop and measure learning outcomes for the School of Management's BSM program.  He has been nominated three times for the Award for Teaching Excellence for Upper-Level Undergraduate Instruction. His PhD is in Marketing from Drexel University (1994). Leonid Tsybeskov joined the department of electrical and computer engineering in 2001 as associate professor. He has a sustained record of excellence in scholarly research in the field of nanostructures. His research is focused on novel materials and structures that promise breakthroughs in the technology of electronic and optical devices based on quantum effects. He was recently elected a Fellow of the American Physical Society. He has a PhD in applied physics from Odessa State University (1986). >>