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2014 - 8 stories
2013 - 2 stories
2012 - 11 stories
2011 - 3 stories
2010 - 13 stories
2009 - 26 stories
2008 - 19 stories
2007 - 7 stories
2006 - 5 stories
2005 - 7 stories
2004 - 6 stories
2003 - 9 stories
2014
Uncontrolled landfills are a growing problem in the developing world, polluting groundwater and emitting foul odors, while also boosting greenhouse gas emissions. >>
Darius Sollohub AIA, director of the New Jersey School of Architecture at NJIT's College of Architecture and Design, will participate in "Closing the Gap in Childhood Obesity: A Forum Without Walls" on May 8, 1:30-3:00 p.m. at the Newark Museum. To view a live stream of the event, click here>>
The timing has been beautifully choreographed by nature. Rising spring temperatures prompt many bee species to begin their search for the flowering plants they depend on for food — and which they propagate through pollination. But what would happen if this vital, mutually beneficial relationship goes out of synch due to climate change? >>
The NJIT campus will be buzzing with undergraduate research teams this summer as students take advantage of the break from lectures and homework to focus on in-depth projects in fields ranging from the life sciences, to biomedical engineering, to mathematical computation.  >>
A substantial new grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) will enable NJIT researchers to delve more deeply into powerful, potentially destructive solar events. >>
Two NJIT engineers, a senior and an alumnus from the Class of 2013, have won National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowships, generous three-year grants that allow them to focus intensively on research as they pursue doctoral degrees in graduate school. >>
Zeynep Çelik, distinguished professor of architecture who holds appointments in NJIT's New Jersey School of Architecture and Federated Department of History, was recently honored by Turkey's Bosphorus University and the Vehbi Koç Foundation for her work in architectural and cultural history. >>
2013
The Provident Bank Foundation announced a $25,000 grant to NJIT in support of the new Center for Resilient Design, a program where students travel to different areas of the state to lend their design expertise to homeowners, businesses and municipalities affected by and rebuilding after Hurricane Sandy. >>
The NJIT Faculty Council Standing Committee on Research will host a Pre-award and Grantsmanship Seminar on Jan. 30, from 11:30 am - 2:30 p.m. in Eberhardt Hall (Room 112).  The Office of Provost and Office of Research and Development are sponsors.  >>
2012
A few days after Hurricane Sandy hit, NJIT Professor Michel Boufadel was awarded a National Science Foundation (NSF) grant to study the impact of the storm on the New Jersey shoreline.  The NSF Rapid Response Research Grant immediately allowed him to take a team of eight researchers to the beaches of Raritan Bay.  >>
NJIT Associate Professor Yuan-Nan Young has been awarded a three-year, $212,000 National Science Foundation grant to mathematically model how surfactants interact with the skin's lipid bi-layer.  A surfactant, also known as a wetting or surface-acting agent, breaks the surface tension of a liquid to create more contact with another substance.  Soap is the best-known surfactant. >>
This Sunday while you're watching this year's Emmy® Awards, here's some news.  “Engineering Ground Zero,” a production of the prominent Boston-based NOVA, was named among six titles for best documentary.  >>
Zachary Marinelli (Lake Hiawatha, NJ), currently matriculating toward his bachelor of science degree in civil engineering at NJIT, will receive a $2000 scholarship to further his education from the Concrete Industry Foundation. >>
A three-day professional development workshop for high school teachers took place at NJIT on July 2, 3, and 5.  >>
While pursuing a doctorate in information systems at NJIT, Elizabeth Avery Gomez, of Whippany, researched better ways to help emergency first responders—often volunteers from grassroots organizations—communicate more efficiently and effectively throughout a crisis.  >>
The Alcoa Foundation, in partnership with national nonprofit Keep America Beautiful (KAB) and the College & University Recycling Coalition (CURC), has given 60 recycling bins to NJIT as part of its national bin grant program to colleges and universities throughout the country during the 2012 RecycleMania collegiate recycling competition. >>
The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded the Department of Biomedical Engineering funding for creating an REU site. >>
NJIT will be receiving 60 recycling containers awarded through the Alcoa Foundation Collegiate Recycling Bin Grant program.  >>
2011
The Newark College of Engineering (NCE) at NJIT has been selected by the National Science Foundation (NSF) to participate as one of 20 universities and colleges across the nation in a new five-year program to keep students enrolled in engineering programs.  >>
Chemical engineering student Elaine Gomez of Union City is the 2011 recipient of the Platinum Sponsors Outstanding Achievement Award from the Hispanic Business Council Scholarship Foundation of NJ, Inc. of Teaneck.  >>
The Brothers of Alpha Sigma Phi, Alpha Rho chapter raised $1000 to support The Lance Armstrong Foundation at a dinner given in honor of a member of Tau Kappa Epsilon, David Ketcham, who is a cancer survivor. >>
2010
NJIT student volunteers served a Thanksgiving dinner to Hyacinth AIDS Foundation staff and clients on Nov. 18 in the Campus Center Atrium. "They all made a great impact on the Hyacinth staff and their clients, from helping to decorate, serving the food and interacting with the clients," said NJIT Campus Center Director Donna Minnich Spuhler.  >>
The exotic world of interspecies music will be revealed on Oct. 6, 2010 when the New Jersey Institute of Technology Excellence in Research Prize and Medal is bestowed upon David Rothenberg, a member of NJIT's faculty, best-selling author and acclaimed jazz clarinetist, by the NJIT Board of Overseers. “Harmonic Connections in Nature, Science and Music,” held at 5 p.m. at the Jim Wise Theater in Kupfrian Hall, will include a presentation by Rothenberg, PhD, professor of philosophy and music, on how and why music enables him to communicate with birds and whales—the subject of his two best-selling books.  >>
Daniel Boston, a doctoral student in NJIT's College of Computing Sciences, provided technological advice to supplement the legal and educational expertise provided by the New Jersey State Bar Foundation Mock Trial Committee for the 29th Annual Vincent J. Apruzzese High School Mock Trial Competition this month. The case deals with distracted driving/walking resulting from the use of wireless electronic communication devices. "It was a good experience working with the Mock Trial Committee in a technical capacity. This provided a wonderful opportunity to evaluate an all-too-real scenario and help shape the technological and technical aspects of the case toward that same level of realism. I am grateful to know that the assistance I provided has been useful to the Mock Trial Committee, and I thank my advisor, Dr. Cristian Borcea, for initially forwarding this opportunity to me." “We greatly appreciate NJIT's input in this year's mock trial case, which we hope will be not only academically challenging but will help to change driving habits and prevent tragic accidents,” said Richard J. Badolato, Esq., president of the New Jersey State Bar Foundation. >>
Two NJIT biomedical researchers have received the prestigious Coulter Foundation Translational Awards for promising patent applications that may some day extend peoples' lives.  >>
Philip R. Goode, PhD, distinguished professor of physics at NJIT and director of Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) in California, has received a three-year, $2.4 million National Science Foundation (NSF) grant to improve the optics at BBSO.  >>
Bernard Harris, MD, the first African American astronaut to walk in space, inspired middle schoolers at NJIT yesterday to pursue careers in science, technology engineering and math by detailing what it really was like to be an astronaut and live in space. The 54 campers, all enrolled at the ExxonMobil Bernard Harris Summer Science Camp, sat spellbound for more than an hour as the medical doctor, an internist by training, recounted what was needed to be successful.  >>
Cheul H. Cho, PhD, an assistant professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at NJIT, will receive the 2010 Phase I Coulter Foundation Translational Research Award for his work on stem cell technology for the treatment of liver failure. Dr. Cho will present his project at the Foundation Annual Meeting on August 9 in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida. >>
Treena Arinzeh, PhD, an associate professor in NJIT's Department of Biomedical Engineering, has been named a Career Awardee of the 2010 Coulter Foundation Translational Award for Biomedical Engineering. The award seeks to support biomedical research that is translational in nature, and to encourage and assist eligible biomedical engineering investigators to establish themselves in academic careers involving translational research.   >>
With July 4th around the bend, if you've ever feared a head injury from a roller coaster ride, it's time to stop worrying and enjoy your local amusement parks. Although a significant body of scientific research has long contended that the physics behind gravitational force isn't enough to cause problems, misconceptions have abounded anyway, said Bryan Pfister, PhD, an assistant professor in the department of biomedical engineering at NJIT. >>
If you want to know more about underwater acoustic communication, ask NJIT Associate Professor Ali Abdi, PhD. A senior member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), Abdi received, on May 10, 2010, the IEEE Region 1 Award for leadership and contributions in this area. >>
Yanchao Zhang, PhD, an assistant professor in the department of electrical and computer engineering at NJIT, has received a National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award for his research project entitled “Dependable Data Management in Heterogeneous Sensor Networks.” >>
NJIT's Information Systems Department, Office of Technology Development and the NSF-funded ADVANCE Project will co-sponsor an interdisciplinary, cross-sector seminar on text-mining and research networks on March 8, 11:30 am-1:30 p.m. (followed by discussion) in the GITC Building, Room 3710. "Automated Discovery of Emerging Online Communities and Research Networks: New Tools and Techniques from Academia and Industry" will feature presentations by Anatoliy Gruzd, PhD (pictured), assistant professor in the School of Information Management at Dalhousie University; and Sheldon Sloan, MD, MBE, vice president of policy, Johnson & Johnson Corporate Office of Science and Technology. Lunch will be provided. >>
2009
Paterson native and NJIT alumnus, Vincent J. Naimoli, a successful businessman who went on to found the Tampa Bay Rays baseball team, has now written his life story, Business, Baseball & Beyond. Naimoli will be at NJIT on Dec. 3, 2009, from 10:45 a.m.-12:45 p.m., in the Campus Center for an exclusive book signing. The public is invited to this special event for which the book's purchase price has been discounted to $20 one book; $35 for two. >>
NJIT researchers are at work on many scientific and technological frontiers. The National Science Foundation has recently provided support that totals nearly $4.3 million for the diverse efforts of the following investigators under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. >>
A drug to stop bleeding during a brain injury and a bed that will prevent bedsores are among the scientific discoveries at NJIT that received earlier this week more than a million dollars in funding from the New Jersey Commission on Science and Technology. >>
NJIT's Bruce Bukiet, a mathematician who has applied mathematical modeling techniques to elucidate the dynamics of run scoring in baseball, has computed the probability of the Yankees and Phillies winning the World Series. He also has computed the most deserving of Major League Baseball's prestigious 2009 Most Valuable Player (MVP) and Cy Young awards. >>
NJIT Professor Dale Gary, PhD, of Berkeley Heights, an expert in solar radio data, was promoted to distinguished professor.   Gary examines the conditions under which solar radio bursts from distinct solar events can disrupt cellular telephone signals. >>
NJIT President Robert A. Altenkirch served as the honorary chairperson of the Hispanic American Chamber of Commerce Foundation of Essex County Ninth Annual Scholarship and Awards Gala Dinner yesterday in the Campus Center Atrium. The Foundation recognizes business, governmental, corporate and individual efforts and accomplishments that positively impact Latino/Hispanic businesses and the Latino/Hispanic community in Essex County. Shown at left are Dr. Altenkirch, Dr. Niathan Allen of Summit Developers, and Robert P. Marasco, who received a Lifetime Achievement Award. >>
NJIT's new 1.6-meter clear aperture solar telescope—the largest of its kind in the world—is now operational.  The unveiling of this remarkable instrument—said to be the pathfinder for all future, large ground-based telescopes—could not have come at a more auspicious moment for science.  This year marks the 400th anniversary of Galileo's telescope that he used to demonstrate that sunspots are indeed on the Sun.  >>
NJIT's 2009 Commencement Ceremony will be held Saturday, May 16, 2009, at the Prudential Center, Newark from 9 a.m.-noon. During the ceremony, more than 2,000 honorary doctoral degrees and earned doctoral, master's, and bachelor's degrees will be conferred on the Class of 2009. >>
The C2PRISM Project, a grant project at NJIT funded by the National Science Foundation, is organizing a Career Day  for approximately 250 Newark high school students on May 11, 8:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. The event, which will be held in the Student Center Ballroom A, Architecture Gallery, GITC Room 3720, and the Campus Center Atrium, will showcase the various mathematics and science careers relevant to the eight NJIT PhD fellows who participated in the project.   >>
Susana Addo Ntim, a PhD student in the department of chemistry and environmental science at NJIT, has been awarded a Faculty for the Future fellowship from the Schlumberger Foundation. The Faculty for the Future awards are open to women academics in science and engineering from developing and emerging countries and provide funding for advanced graduate study. The long-term goal of the program is to generate conditions that result in more young women pursuing scientific disciplines. >>
Image Processing and Mathematical Morphology: Fundamentals and Applications (CRC Publisher, 2009), a new reference book by NJIT computer science professor Frank Y. Shih offers a comprehensive overview of morphological mechanisms and techniques and their relation to image processing. More than merely a tutorial on vital technical information, the book places this knowledge into a theoretical framework. Morphology is the identification, analysis and description of  the structure of words. >>
Thirty-five NJIT faculty members and graduate students will present posters describing new research in a wide range of disciplines supported by the National Science Foundation-funded NJIT ADVANCE Program on March 30, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. in the Campus Center Atrium. Speakers at the 2009 NJIT ADVANCE Research Showcase include: Donald Sebastian, PhD, interim provost and senior vice president for research and development at NJIT; Semahat Demir, PhD, NSF Biomedical Engineering Program Director; and Elizabeth Posillico, PhD, president and CEO, Elusys Therapeutics, Inc. >>
To promote the health of at-risk teenagers in Newark and the surrounding area, NJIT has received a $20,000 grant from The Horizon Foundation for New Jersey.   >>
The newly-established Academy of Geo-Professionals, established by the American Society of Civil Engineers, will induct NJIT professor of civil engineering Priscilla Nelson, PhD, the former provost, into its inaugural class on March 18, 2009.  >>
Distinguished Professor Alok K. Chakrabarti was recognized last week by his friends and colleagues for his years of dedicated service to NJIT's School of Management. Chakrabarti served as the founding dean for the School of Management for more than 11 years and led the school through its initial AACSB accreditation. Since his hire in 1988, he also served as the Foundation Chair in Management of Technology, where he continued to make significant contributions to research in this area. >>
Kwabena A. Narh, PhD, associate chair and undergraduate advisor for the Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department, presented a poster at the National Science Foundation Engineering Education Awardees Conference held in Reston, VA from Feb. 1-3. The title of his poster was “Outcomes and Lesson Learnt at the REU-site on Engineered Nano-Composite Particulate Materials.” Narh also recently presented a paper titled “Influence of Deagglomeration States of Carbon Nanotubes on the Thermal and Mechanical Properties of Nanocomposites” at AsiaNaNo 2008, the 2008 Asian Conference on Nanoscience and Nanotechnology.  >>
Robert K. Prud'homme, PhD, professor and director of the Program in Engineering Biology at Princeton University, will discuss "Next Generation Nano Carriers for Multifunctional Drug Delivery, Imaging, and Targeting-How Do We Make Them?" on Feb. 23 at 2:45 p.m. in Kupfrian Hall Rm. 205. The Otto H. York Department of Chemical, Biological and Pharmaceutical Engineering Graduate Seminar is presented by the NSF-ERC for Structured Organic Particulate Systems (C-SOPS) at NJIT. Contact: R. Dave, dave@njit.edu, (973) 596-5860. >>
NJIT's Office of Technology Development is hosting an 11-week series of webinars focused on commercialization of research (life science and engineering-based technology), on Wednesdays beginning Jan. 14–March 25, 1-2:30 p.m. in the Guttenberg Information Technologies Center 1403. Co-organized by the National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation and the National Council of Entrepreneurial Tech Transfer, the course will discuss the practical business and legal issues that researchers need to understand to commercialize their research. Contact Judith Sheft, Associate Vice President Technology Development at 973-596-5825; sheft@njit.edu.            >>
Nirwan Ansari, of Montville, a professor in the department of electrical and computer engineering at NJIT, has received two notable honors. The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) has named him a Fellow for his contributions to broadband networks and communications. Ansari also received an award from the IEEE member and geographic activities board. >>
2008
Priscilla P. Nelson, PhD, has announced that she will resign her position as provost and senior vice president for academic affairs at New Jersey Institute of Technology, effective November 28, 2008, to pursue the university's special projects related to international program development. >>
A structural engineer and world-renowned expert on how structures respond to natural disasters, M. Ala Saadeghvaziri, PhD, a professor at NJIT, has been named a Fellow by the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). Saadeghvaziri, of Basking Ridge, researches the effect upon buildings and other structures due to time, usage and loadings or the outcome of disasters such as earthquakes or explosions. >>
NJIT has received a donation of $30,000 from Charles Lubetkin, of Verona. The money has been earmarked for the Lubetkin Family Soccer Endowed Scholarship fund.       >>
NJIT's Bruce Bukiet, a mathematician who has applied mathematical modeling techniques to elucidate the dynamics of run scoring in baseball, is now applying his methods to ascertain the players most deserving of major league baseball's prestigious 2008 Most Valuable Player (MVP) and Cy Young awards. >>
An NJIT professor who has discovered new communication channels in underwater environments and invented a technique to communicate data through these channels will be honored later this month by the New Jersey Inventors Hall of Fame. >>
NJIT received $27,000 from Bridgewater-based National Starch and Chemical Foundation to support two NJIT's pre-college programs, both benefiting women. The Women in Engineering Technology Initiative FEMME received $12,000 while a similar initiative to promote positive changes in the educational environment in Newark classrooms received $15,000. >>
Three Indian students from the Heritage Institute of Technology, Kolkata, India, are spending the summer in New Jersey in NJIT's new Vincent A. Stabile Systems Engineering and Management Laboratories. Working with Stabile Scholar Frank Munoz (left), a graduate student in engineering management, Soumik Chakrabarty, Saurabh Kumar, and Shipon Roy are taking advantage of a rare opportunity to gain experience with the Stabile Laboratories' Festo System. >>
It's okay to be a geek because geeks rule the world, astronaut Bernard Harris told 52 middle school youngsters during a special luncheon at NJIT's ExxonMobil Bernard Harris Summer Science Camp.  >>
The Continuing Professional Education division at NJIT is pleased to announce that the EmployME! Information Technology (IT) training program for adults (www.myemployme.org), has successfully placed more than 62 percent of the program's graduates from its first full session.  >>
NJIT has awarded the first Thomas Fellowships to a gifted computer scientist from South Jersey and a promising young Chinese electrical engineer with three patents already under his belt. >>
New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) will host May 19-21, 2008, more than 200 leading experts for the fifth annual Frontiers in Applied and Computational Mathematics Conference, an unusual three-day event featuring leading researchers who will discuss the latest news and research findings in their fields. >>
NJIT Provost Priscilla P. Nelson, of West Orange, received the Kenneth R. Row Award from the American Association of Engineering Sciences on May 5 for promoting unity among engineering societies. She accomplished this goal through her current work at NJIT coupled with earlier leadership positions at the National Science Foundation (NSF). >>
NJIT Provost Priscilla Nelson, of West Orange, will be honored tonight in Washington, DC, by the American Association of Engineering Societies for promoting unity among the engineering societies.  The organization said she accomplished this goal through her leadership positions at the National Science Foundation (NSF) and NJIT.  She will receive the Kenneth Andrew Roe Award in recognition of this work at a banquet. >>
Edgardo Farinas, PhD, an assistant professor in the department of chemistry and environmental science at NJIT, has received a National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER award for his project "New Tools for High-Throughput Screening of Protein Libraries: Engineering Metalloproteins Displayed on Bacillus Subtilis Spores." The prestigious career award recognizes teacher-scholars most likely to become the academic leaders of the 21st century. >>
Sheryl Sorby, National Science Foundation Program Director for Undergraduate Education and former chair of Engineering Fundamentals and associate dean of engineering at Michigan Tech, will discuss the correlation between well-developed spatial skills and success in engineering, computer science, chemistry and computer-aided design on April 15 at 2:30 p.m. in Eberhardt Hall Room 112. The presentation is co-sponsored by the NJIT/NCE Extension Services in Engineering Project Team and the NSF-funded NJIT ADVANCE Project. For more information, contact Professor Norman Loney at loney@njit.edu or Talina Knox at knoxt@njit.edu. >>
NJIT's indefatigable math professor Bruce Bukiet is once again opining on outcomes for this season's Major League Baseball teams. His picks are based on a mathematical model he developed in 2000.  >>
During the next decade, solar physicists will learn more than they have dreamed possible about the Sun, thanks to current technologies that have advanced the capacity of land-based instruments. Such advancements will be the focus of a talk on March 26, 2008 by noted NJIT solar astronomer Philip R. Goode, PhD.  >>
Kwabena Albert Narh, PhD, an associate professor in the department of mechanical engineering at NJIT, has been awarded a grant by the Civil, Mechanical, and Manufacturing Innovation Division of the National Science Foundation to investigate the use of cryogenic ball-milling to deagglomerate highly clustered carbon nanotubes. >>
2007
The NJIT ADVANCE 2007-2008 Seminar Series and the Provost's Institute Workshop Series will present “New Frontiers in Interdisciplinary and Collaborative Research,” a workshop by Diana Rhoten, National Science Foundation Program Director in the areas of Virtual Organizations and Learning & Workforce Development for the Office of Cyberinfrastructure and Director of the Social Science Research Council's Knowledge Institutions and Innovation Program, on Dec. 3, 4-5:30 p.m. in Eberhardt Hall Rm. 112. RSVP: Theresa Hunt. >>
A pioneering educator at NJIT who strongly believes in experiential learning was today named 2007 New Jersey Professor of the Year by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. Osama Eljabiri, a senior university lecturer who founded, taught and continues to develop the senior project capstone course program at NJIT's College of Computing Sciences, was recognized for his diligence and dedication for promoting this new type of learning. >>
The New Jersey School of Architecture at NJIT has been selected to host the Mayors' Institute on City Design (MICD) later this year. A partnership program of the National Endowment for the Arts, the American Architectural Foundation, and the United States Conference of Mayors, the MICD has helped transform communities through design by preparing mayors to be the chief urban designers of their cities. >>
Former astronaut Bernard Harris and the ExxonMobil Foundation have named NJIT to be among 19 university campus locations that will host the 2007 ExxonMobil Bernard Harris Summer Science Camps. NJIT will be the only New Jersey participant in the program. >>
David Mendonça, an associate professor in the department of information systems at NJIT, has received a $700,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to study creativity by first responders following the 2001 World Trade Center attack and the 1995 bombing of the Murrah Federal Building. >>
Professors at NJIT were awarded a $1.1 million, three-year grant from the National Science Foundation to change the way inner city students learn about science and technology. The money will allow engineering professors from NJIT's Newark College of Engineering and specialists from NJIT's Center for Pre-College Programs to help public school teachers in Newark, Orange, Perth Amboy and Union City build an exciting, sophisticated science and technology curriculum. >>
NJIT will lead a public-private partnership preparing adults with physical disabilities for entry-level and advanced jobs in information technology. A $946,000, two-year grant from the Henry H. Kessler Foundation, of West Orange, will support “EmployMe!,” a two-year, continuing education program. >>
2006
Nancy Steffen-Fluhr, PhD, director of The Murray Center for Women in Technology at NJIT, provided an overview of NJIT's National Science Foundation-funded ADVANCE Institutional Transformation Grant at the first in a series of partnership seminars on Nov. 15 in Eberhardt Hall. The grant initiative, which is part of NJIT's Strategic Plan commitment to enhanced faculty diversity, positions the university as a leader among peer institutions in the national effort to advance women in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields. >>
Alexander Haimovich wants to improve consumer wireless services during the next three years, despite predictions of worsening services. That's why Haimovich, an electrical and computer engineering professor at NJIT will lead a research team to prevent a downturn in services. >>
NJIT will lead the way for the next four years to train and place more effective science and math teachers in urban high schools in Newark and other high needs districts around the state. “We're sending into the neediest New Jersey high schools, 26 new teachers, who will make math and science come alive for their students,” said principal investigator Bruce Bukiet, PhD, associate professor in the department of mathematical sciences and associate dean of the College of Science and Liberal Arts at NJIT. >>
Ten college students from across the nation will spend the early summer at NJIT helping professors conduct research into computer networking and security. The students' 10-week stay at NJIT is supported by a three-year, $300,000 grant from the National Science Foundation. >>
The Day In The Life Foundation, which introduces high school students to the working world through its Day in the Life Series of professional experiences, presented a conversation and discussion on the plight of young black men in America with actor and author Hill Harper on May 25 at NJIT. Harper, who appears on the television drama CSI:NY, offered words of inspiration and encouragement to the audience of more than 300 young men in the Newark Public School system and from Union, Elizabeth, West Orange and Baltimore who attended the forum.  >>
2005
Howard Kimmel, PhD, professor of chemical engineering and executive director of New Jersey Institute of Technology's (NJIT) Center for Pre-College Programs, received the NJIT Foundation Overseers Public and Institute Service Award. >>
New horizons for engineering and technology will be the subject of the keynote address delivered by Joseph Bordogna, PhD, Alfred Fitler Moore Professor of Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania, at NJIT's annual University Convocation ceremony, Sept. 28 at 2:30 p.m. in the Jim Wise Theatre, Kupfrian Hall. The event will honor distinguished NJIT professors, students, and staff. George Newcombe, '69 will receive the Weston Medal, NJIT's highest honor. >>
A wireless telecommunications expert from NJIT has joined the National Science Foundation (NSF) to oversee the funding of theoretical research in communications. Sirin Tekinay, PhD, an associate professor in the electrical and computer engineering department, was named program director for the Theoretical Foundations Cluster in the NSF's Division of Computing and Communication Foundations. >>
New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) played host this weekend to more than 250 leading experts in applied mathematics.  The researchers poured onto campus for an unusual three-day conference to discuss the frontiers of applied and computational mathematics.The National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Air Force Office of Special Research (AFOSR) provided funding. Other sponsors were NJIT, the Society of Math Biology and the Mathematical Biosciences Institute. NJIT's Department of Mathematical Sciences and Center for Applied Mathematics and Statistics organized the event. >>
The Albert Dorman Honors College has received a $10,000 grant from the Guidant Foundation that will fund student-research internships in the applied life sciences at New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT). >>
Paige Cottingham-Streater, deputy executive director of The Maureen and Mike Mansfield Foundation, will speak on the topic “How Can Technology Promote U.S.-Japan Relations?” on March 28, 2005, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. in the Campus Center Ballroom. Cottingham-Streater's talk will combine her expertise in Japan's policymaking processes and U.S.-Japan relations with NJIT's interest in technology. The colloquium is free and open to the public >>
David Mendonca, PhD, an assistant professor of information systems at NJIT who has worked to improve the way society responds to disasters, has received a National Science Foundation Career award--the foundation's most prestigious award for new faculty members.  At the core of Mendonca's work will be improving the public's understanding of how to improvise successfully in emergencies. >>
2004
Solar physicists at NJIT say they expect to see dawn's first light by January of 2006 with the new 1.6-meter telescope currently under construction. The National Science Foundation recently awarded $1.5 million to the project, which will arguably create the world's largest optical telescope for solar research. >>
New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) will receive 30 laptop computers courtesy of the Beaumont Foundation of America, which has awarded the university a technology grant valued at $65,000. >>
Solar physicists at New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) say they expect to see dawn's first light by January of 2006 with the new 1.6-meter telescope currently under construction.  The National Science Foundation (NSF) recently awarded $1.5 million to the project which will arguably create the world's largest optical telescope for solar research.  >>
NJIT will receive 30 laptop computers courtesy of the Beaumont Foundation of America, which has awarded the university a technology grant valued at $65,000. >>
The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded Dale Gary, PhD, professor of physics at NJIT, $832,927 to continue his research to develop a global network of 100 radio telescopes to learn more about radio waves from the sun. >>
While some teenagers fritter away their summers bathing in the sunlight, frolicking in the pool or repairing to the local mall, a group 20 teenage girls are ensconced in labs at the New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), devoting their summer to designing circuit boards, building robots and analyzing micro-bugs. >>
2003
Scientists have long believed that the breakup of all fluids—whether produced by a dripping faucet, a splashing fountain or the sun's boiling surface—exhibit the same type of dynamics. Now a group of scientists has discovered an exceptional dynamic associated with the breakup of a water drop in a highly viscous oil. This dynamic could potentially be used to create microscopically small fibers, wires and particles. >>
To help detect and study genetic changes in cells more quickly and efficiently, Timothy Chang, Ph.D., associate professor of electrical and computer engineering at New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) was recently awarded a three-year, $640,000 National Science Foundation (NSF) grant. >>
To help detect and study genetic changes in cells more quickly and efficiently, NJIT's Timothy Chang, PhD, associate professor of electrical and computer engineering, was recently awarded a three-year, $640,000 National Science Foundation grant. Chang, working with Patricia Soteropoulos, PhD, Director of the Public Health Research Institute's Center for Applied Genomics, has developed a robotic technique for getting genetic material onto slides precisely, quickly, and cheaply. >>
Up-to-the minute reports and photographs detailing magnetic fields, radiation and high-energy particles surrounding the sun will soon be available on a new website to be developed and operated by solar physicists at New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT). >>
Symeon Papavassiliou, Ph.D., an assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at the New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), won the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Early Career Development Award to develop software tools and network architecture to better manage wireless and wired networks. >>
A $440,000 research grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) Early Career Development Award Program has been awarded to a professor at New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) to build the brains of a solar telescope. >>
Ralph E. Gomory, president of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, will speak about global trade and conflicting national interests on April 22, 2003 at New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT). The talk, sponsored by the School of Management at NJIT, will begin at 6:30 p.m. following registration and a reception that starts at 5:45 p.m. The event, which will take place in the Hazel Ballroom on the NJIT campus, is free and open to the public. For more information contact Barbara Tedesco (tedesco@adm.njit.edu). >>
Sheila Wellington, President of Catalyst Foundation Inc., New York City, exhorted women students, faculty and staff members at New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) last week to exceed performance expectations. >>
Treena Livingston Arinzeh, Ph.D., an assistant professor of biomedical engineering at the New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), won the National Science Foundation's (NSF) most prestigious honor for outstanding young researchers. >>