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2013 - 12 stories
2012 - 7 stories
2011 - 1 story
2010 - 1 story
2009 - 2 stories
2008 - 1 story
2007 - 2 stories
2006 - 2 stories
2005 - 6 stories
2013
One year following the events of Hurricane Sandy, the Center for Resilient Design at New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) will host a public reception on Monday, October 28, 2013, that will provide an opportunity to learn more about the 10 Rebuild by Design teams' unique visions to make the New York/New Jersey region more resilient. >>
The U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) and the Hurricane Sandy Rebuilding Task Force teamed up to host the Hurricane Sandy Small Business Recovery and Matchmaking Summit on Aug. 7 at NJIT.  The event, first of its kind in the region since the disaster, educated and connected small businesses to commercial buyers from the private sector and federal, state and local governments. >>
NJIT will be hosting a symposium and workshop by AIA Regional Recovery Working Group entitled “Post Sandy: the Effect on the URBAN” on July 9 from 8:00 a.m.– 5:30 p.m. in Weston Hall.  >>
Rima Taher, senior university lecturer at NJIT's College of Architecture and Design, taught a live webinar yesterday on “Design and Construction of Low-Rise Buildings for High Winds and Hurricanes.” >>
The Provident Bank Foundation announced a $25,000 grant to NJIT in support of the new Center for Resilient Design, a program where students travel to different areas of the state to lend their design expertise to homeowners, businesses and municipalities affected by and rebuilding after Hurricane Sandy. >>
WHAT:  The NJIT bus deposits daily some two dozen NJIT students adorned in bright yellow t-shirts at Long Beach Island's long-standing and beloved Surflight Theater, ravaged unfortunately by Sandy.  The students are performing not Shakespeare, but light construction work plus cleaning up and tending to small repairs.  For over 60 years, Surflight has been home to local actors and actresses as well as students getting their feet wet in the world of community theatre.   >>
WHAT:   Every day this week some 35 NJIT students wearing bright yellow t-shirts, who call themselves the “bucket brigade” take a 90-minute bus ride down and back from the NJIT campus to rebuild fencing and plant scrub-brushes on dunes in Asbury Park.  Come Friday as the fruits of their labors become more visible a hearty party is planned featuring a rock band.  >>
NJIT students, professors, staff  and others from universities throughout the US are descending upon New Jersey this week to eradicate the remaining devastation from Super Storm Sandy.  Some two dozen projects located at points as far north as the IHS Development Corporation in Newark and as far south as the Surflight Theater in Beach Haven will receive help.  Daily buses leave the NJIT campus filled with students and others in bright yellow t-shirts and even brighter smiles.   >>
Some 25 members of NJIT's men's track and field team will volunteer their brawn and brains tomorrow to tackle cleaning up the headquarters of IHS Development Corporation, Newark.   Ravaged by hurricanes Sandy and Irene, the building remains in need of help and students' efforts.   Volunteers will remove light debris, lift moderate boxes and materials and perform minor carpentry repairs.  The students are part of a larger 600-body task force assembled during the past month by NJIT's College of Architecture and Design (COAD). Dubbed the “Alternative Spring Break,” the effort has targeted cleaning up facilities, residences and areas damaged by the super storm.  Students from other colleges and universities are also participating.   >>
WHAT:  During Alternative Spring Break, over 500 NJIT students, faculty, staff and alumni will do volunteer work from Newark to the Jersey shore, cleaning up devastated areas and helping towns rebuild in a resilient manner.  Students will work on removing debris from beaches and parks, removing floors and wallboard, replacing floors and walls, painting and carpentry, stocking and distributing food and clothing, and compiling information on areas affected by Sandy.   >>
Lessons learned from Hurricane Katrina will be the focus of a Friday morning discussion at NJIT between a New Orleans designer instrumental in helping that city rebuild and planner Thomas Dallessio, the project manager of NJIT's new Center for Resilient Design.  >>
Darius Sollohub, associate professor of architecture at NJIT's College of Architecture and Design, was recently quoted in an article appearing in The Wall Street Journal.  >>
2012
NJIT publicly launched a major initiative today to call upon the university's myriad levels of expertise – design and architecture, urban planning and environmental engineering – to help the state recover from Hurricane Sandy.  >>
NJIT's College of Architecture and Design (COAD) is energetically involved in helping New Jersey recover from the devastation of Hurricane Sandy.  The university has established a post-Sandy recovery program of research, design and case-study projects that will provide state and local leaders, business owners and residents with 21st -century expertise and ready-to-build designs for recovery in hard-hit areas. >>
A few days after Hurricane Sandy hit, NJIT Professor Michel Boufadel was awarded a National Science Foundation (NSF) grant to study the impact of the storm on the New Jersey shoreline.  The NSF Rapid Response Research Grant immediately allowed him to take a team of eight researchers to the beaches of Raritan Bay.  >>
NJIT's Michael Chumer has been hard at work since Sandy struck, helping hard-hit area urbanites cope with devastation.  Chumer, who has worked on homeland security projects and directs the NJIT MS in Emergency Management and Business Continuity (EMBC) program, is familiar with relief efforts.  >>
Rebuilding in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, homeowners might consider the advice of Rima Taher, an expert in the design of low-rise buildings for extreme winds and hurricanes.  >>
With the start of the hurricane season and the current upswing in new home construction across the nation, it's never too late to think now about research-proven building and roof designs for regions susceptible to hurricane force winds.  >>
The post-Hurricane Katrina New Orleans planning and design work of James Dart, AIA, university lecturer and director of the Siena Urban Design Studio at NJIT's College of Architecture and Design (COAD) is featured in a new book that examines the roles and responsibilities of architects in disaster recovery. >>
2011
Structural engineer Rima Taher, PhD, an expert in the design of low-rise buildings that can withstand extreme winds and hurricanes and a university lecturer in NJIT's College of Architecture and Design, was recently elected chair of the structural technical group of the Northern New Jersey branch of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). >>
2010
Rima Taher, an expert in the design of low-rise buildings for extreme winds and hurricanes, is available to educate people about best building design and construction practices to reduce wind pressures on building surfaces. >>
2009
James Dart AIA, university lecturer in the College of Architecture and Design and principal of DARCH in New York City, will be a contributor at a national conference "New Orleans Under Reconstruction: The Crisis of Planning" on Oct. 24-25 at Tulane University. Dart, along with Associate Professor Darius Sollohub and many dedicated NJIT architecture students, has been active in planning and design efforts in New Orleans since Hurricane Katrina struck in 2005.   >>
Better building practices for structures in hurricane-prone regions will be the focus of a paper next month in Caribbean Construction Magazine by NJIT architecture professor Rima Taher, PhD.  Taher has written extensively about best building design and construction practices to reduce wind pressures on building surfaces and to resist high winds and hurricanes in residential or commercial construction. >>
2008
More than ever before, building design and construction can be significantly improved to reduce wind pressures on building surfaces and to help better resist high winds and hurricanes in residential or commercial construction, said NJIT architecture professor Rima Taher, PhD.  >>
2007
A few days ago, the remnants of Hurricane Noel traveled northward to New York and New England with wind speeds approaching 80 miles per hour in Massachusetts. The storm caused significant damages, especially there. >>
Certain home shapes and roof types can better resist high winds and hurricanes, according to a researcher at NJIT. Civil engineer Rima Taher, PhD, special lecturer in  NJIT's New Jersey School of Architecture, spent two years examining the findings of research centers that have studied the best designs, construction materials and methods needed to withstand extreme wind events and hurricanes. >>
2006
A closer look at how people react during emergencies, the role of computers and technology and what really happened during Hurricane Katrina number among the topics to be discussed at the third annual meeting of the Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management (ISCRAM). New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) will host the event May 14-17, 2006. >>
A group of 50 students from NJIT's New Jersey School of Architecture will spend spring break cleaning out houses in a flood-ravaged neighborhood in New Orleans. "Helping people rebuild their houses, and their lives, is an amazing feeling and a great experience,” says Thomas Reynolds, a senior at NJIT who helped organize the trip. “I'd much rather spend my vacation helping these people than sitting on a beach in Florida.” >>
2005
Three New Jersey Institute of Technology experts are available to discuss levee rebuilding, sewer and underground utilities and waste water management-all issues facing rescuers and future reconstruction efforts in areas of Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama damaged by Hurricane Katrina. >>
Just days after Hurricane Katrina deluged the Gulf Coast, NJIT President Robert A. Altenkirch invited students whose colleges were damaged by the hurricane to enroll at NJIT. Now, NJIT has its first student from New Orleans: Sean Kirkland, who would have been a senior at Tulane University, is enrolled at NJIT's New Jersey School of Architecture. “Everyone at NJIT has been extremely kind and welcoming and I'm really grateful to be studying here,” Kirkland said. >>
“It appears that the levee failures in New Orleans were induced by subsurface seepage through the soils, not by overtopping,” said John Schuring, PhD and PE, professor of civil and environmental engineering at NJIT. “Given the fact that the levees were built and retrofitted many times over the years, and also given the fact that other weaknesses in the soil may exist, care must be taken when the city is dewatered to avoid another failure.” >>
“The flood waters in New Orleans are potentially infectious.  Removal and treatment will be slow and difficult, and even after the water is pumped out, the infection hazard will remain for some time to come,” Hsin-Neng Hsieh, PhD, PE, professor of civil and environmental engineering at NJIT. >>
In an effort to help those affected by Hurricane Katrina, NJIT has established the Campus Center Office as a collection point for American Red Cross donations to aid the victims of Hurricane Katrina. In addition, Red Cross collection tables will be present at all major events >>
NJIT will offer “visiting student” status this fall semester to students attending colleges and universities in the areas affected by Hurricane Katrina. Such status means that students will have the option of attending classes at NJIT and then transfer credits to their home institutions. “We understand that it may be some time before the universities are back in full swing,” said Robert A. Altenkirch, PhD, president of NJIT and former vice president for research at Mississippi State University. "I lived and worked in Mississippi for many years and my heart goes out to the people who are suffering as a result of the devastation this storm has delivered." >>