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2004 - 4 stories
2004
"Stem cell biology is one of the greatest revolutions in bio-medicine," Ira Black, MD, told 350 listeners at a forum on stem cell research held at NJIT on Oct. 18. Treena Livingston Arinzeh, PhD, NJIT assistant professor of biomedical engineering and a recent recipient of the 2003 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, described how her studies point the way to "off the shelf" therapies for broken bones and spinal cord injuries. Black and Arinzeh's presentation was the second in NJIT's new Technoogy and Society Forum Series. >>
--“Stem cell biology is one of the greatest revolutions in bio-medicine,” Ira Black, MD,  told 350 listeners at yesterday's forum at New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) on stem cell research.  Black, chair of the department of neuroscience and cell research at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey- Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, discussed recent breakthroughs in stem cell research.  He talked about the it might bring for treatments of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, spinal cord injuries, birth defects, and other degenerative diseases. Treena Livingston Arinzeh, PhD, NJIT assistant professor of biomedical engineering, also spoke. In introducing Arinzeh, Black called tissue engineering “the next level” in bio-medical research. Arinzeh described how her studies point the way to “off the shelf” therapies for broken bones and spinal cord injuries. Arinzeh recently received the 2003 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers for her research on adult stem cells. >>
Adult stem cell research and how it can help cure Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and spinal cord injuries will be discussed Oct. 18 at the technology forum sponsored by NJIT.  Ira Black, MD, founding director of the Stem Cell Institute of New Jersey, will be the featured speaker. NJIT Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering Treena Livingston Arinzeh, the only Northeast recipient of the National Science Foundation's 2003 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), will also discuss her work. >>
Adult stem cell research and how it can help cure Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and spinal cord injuries will be discussed Oct. 18 at the technology forum sponsored by New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT).  Ira Black, MD, founding director of the Stem Cell Institute of New Jersey, will be the featured speaker. NJIT Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering Treena Livingston Arinzeh, the only Northeast recipient of the National Science Foundation's 2003 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), will also discuss her work. >>