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2014 - 5 stories
2013 - 2 stories
2012 - 2 stories
2011 - 2 stories
2010 - 4 stories
2009 - 2 stories
2008 - 1 story
2007 - 2 stories
2006 - 2 stories
2004 - 6 stories
2003 - 3 stories
2014
More than two years ago, NJIT Professor Michael Chumer was testing Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) that were deployed in California yet able to send video into his emergency management network at NJIT. >>
A substantial new grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) will enable NJIT researchers to delve more deeply into powerful, potentially destructive solar events. >>
Now deep into the scientific discovery phase of a two-year orbit, NASA's Van Allen Probes, carrying an NJIT instrument that measures the composition of the radiation belts surrounding Earth, are shedding new light on a hazardous, little-understood region of the planet's outermost atmosphere. >>
NJIT Distinguished Research Professor of Physics Louis J. Lanzerotti recently received an award from the American Meteorological Society (AMS) for “Sustained Leadership and Contributions to the Space Weather Enterprise and Creative Stewardship of the Space Weather Journal.”  >>
2013
The cadets of NJIT's Air Force ROTC Detachment 490 recently performed color guard duties at the annual Mario Batali Foundation Golf Tournament at Liberty National Golf Course in Jersey City.  >>
Two new patents to improve orthogonal space time codes and decode data transmissions of space time spreading were recently awarded to NJIT Distinguished Professor Yeheskel Bar-Ness, executive director of the Elisha Yegal Bar-Ness Center for Wireless Communications and Signal Processing Research.  Co-inventors with Bar-Ness on both patents were NJIT alums Amir Laufer and Kodzovi Acolatse. >>
2012
NJIT Distinguished Research Professor and former Bell Labs scientist Louis J. Lanzerotti, will see his 50-year quest to better understand space weather and Earth's Van Allen Radiation Belts rocket, once again, into space on Aug. 23, 2012.  >>
2011
Sometimes engineering school really can be fun. Just ask the six Newark College of Engineering undergrads who created and designed their own micro airplane. >>
2010
The NJIT Astronomy Club will host a public talk on research with the Hubble Space Telescope on Oct. 18 at 8 p.m. in Kupfrian 117. The talk is by Slawomir Piatek, senior university lecturer in NJIT's Department of Physics, whose research group has been measuring motions for nearby dwarf satellite galaxies using data taken with the Hubble Space Telescope. Telescopes will be set up after the talk, weather permitting, to view Jupiter and the Moon. Contact: Dale E. Gary at 973-596-5376.  >>
Historians usually depict the space race of the 1960s and 1970s as a pitched technological battle between Cold War political rivals. Yet while U.S. and Soviet spacecraft forced the world to look upward towards the Moon, they also, quite ironically, encouraged citizens across the globe to gaze back down at “spaceship Earth” with a newfound environmental awareness.  >>
More than 100 young girls from throughout New Jersey enrolled in the NJIT FEMME program will complete an assortment of hands-on, exciting science projects—from building space stations to tie-dyeing t-shirts—during the next two final weeks of FEMME. >>
Louis J. Lanzerotti, PhD, a distinguished research professor in the department of physics at NJIT, will lead the 12-member panel organized by the National Research Council (NRC) of the National Academies (www.nationalacademies.org) to identify possible causes of unintended acceleration in vehicles in the aftermath of Toyota's large recalls. >>
2009
NJIT Distinguished Professor of Physics Dale E. Gary will guide visitors on a journey to the center of the galaxy on Dec. 11, 2009 at the Cooperative Extension Services, Warren County. >>
Haimin Wang, of Livingston, an NJIT professor, whose work focuses on the physics behind space weather in order to predict unexpected and unwanted solar activities and their effect on Earth, has received the NJIT Excellence in Research Award. >>
2008
The New Jersey Commission on Science and Technology has awarded almost $100,000 as part of its SBIR bridge grant program to two start-up companies based in NJIT's high technology business incubator. Applechem Inc. and Lenterra, located in NJIT's Enterprise Development Center (EDC), each received Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) bridge grants. >>
2007
The safety of technologies and humans in space, based on weather, is of special interest to Lanzerotti, who in 2006 was the principal investigator for instruments on the new NASA Radiation Belts Storm Probes mission to investigate Earth's Van Allen radiation belts.  >>
Andy Norris, PhD, a professor in the department of mechanical and aerospace engineering at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, will discuss "Crack Front Waves and Matched Asymptotic Expansions" at an Applied Mathematics Colloquium on Jan. 26 at 11:30 a.m. in Cullimore Lecture Hall II. >>
2006
Amateur astronomers can learn an assortment of information ranging from what it's like to work with the Hubble telescope to the pleasures of star-gazing with high-power professional equipment at New Jersey's annual Astronomy Day on May 6 in Hackettstown. >>
Gregory Olsen, an entrepreneur and scientist who in October 2005 became the third private citizen to make a paid trip into space, will meet with students from the Albert Dorman Honors College, the Educational Opportunity Program and faculty from NJIT on April 26. The talk will take place at 3 p.m. in Eberhardt Hall. >>
2004
"Space--The Final Frontier: What Is It Like to Live and Work in Space?", a lecture by Al Sacco, Jr., PhD, will be presented by the Albert Dorman Honors College as part of its colloquium series on Nov. 1, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Campus Center Ballroom. A former astronaut, Sacco is director of the Center for Advanced Microgravity Materials Processing and professor of chemical engineering at Northeastern University. >>
A book exploring the sun and interplanetary space co-edited by NJIT Professor of Physics Dale Gary, PhD was released this past week. Solar and Space Weather Radiophysics Current Status and Future Developments, published by Springer Publishing Company, is a 400-page hard-cover text that is part of a series about astrophysics and space science. >>
A book exploring the sun and interplanetary space co-edited by, New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) Professor of Physics Dale Gary, PhD was released this past week.   Solar and Space Weather Radiophysics Current Status and Future Developments, published by Springer Publishing Company, is a 400-page hard-cover text which is part of a series about astrophysics and space science. Gary's co-editor is Christoph Keller, associate astronomer at the National Solar Observatory, Tucson. >>
The Committee on Space Research (COSPAR) will present next week the William Nordberg Medal for space science to Louis J. Lanzerotti, distinguished professor of physics at New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT).  Lanzerotti, a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the International Academy of Astronautics, is chairing the 20-person, blue-ribbon panel to study whether or not to prolong the mission of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST).  Lanzerotti is also a consulting physicist to Bell Laboratories-Lucent Technologies, Murray Hill. >>
The Committee on Space Research (COSPAR) will present the William Nordberg Medal for space science to Louis J. Lanzerotti, distinguished professor of physics at NJIT, on July 19, 2004. Lanzerotti, a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the International Academy of Astronautics, is chairing the 20-person, blue-ribbon panel to study whether or not to prolong the mission of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The Nordberg Medal is awarded to a scientist who has made a distinguished contribution to the application of space science in a field covered by COSPAR. >>
New Jersey Institute of Technology Space Explorer Louis Lanzerotti Heads Committee To Study Hubble's Fate  >>
2003
New Jersey Institute of Technology/Bell Labs physicist Louis Lanzerotti was part of international team that studied the unquiet sun when it was most active and found some surprises. >>
When the Voyager I space craft was launched more than 26 years ago, it carried an instrument designed to analyze the charged particles it encountered in space. That included particles around the outer planets Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Pluto as well as those in the interplanetary medium. >>

MEDIA ADVISORY

October 28, 2003
A major solar flare, possibly the second largest ever recorded, erupted today at 6:30 a.m. The intensity of the flare has sent a space storm careening towards the Earth. If the storm's magnetic field is in the right direction – opposite that of the earth – it could cause problems when it reaches us Wednesday. It could knock out power grids, upset satellites and disrupt GPS signals. More benignly, if the weather is clear, people who peer into the northern sky on Wednesday night could see a shimmer of lights known as an aurora,” says NJIT physicist Dale Gary. >>