News

Looking for something?
Search Newsroom
RSS Feed

Stories Tagged with "summer architecture career exploration program"

Submit Search
2005 - 2 stories
2004 - 2 stories
2005
A group of high school students from New Jersey, New York and Maryland won an architectural design competition held recently at NJIT with an unusual twist: The students had to design and build a meditation room out of nothing more than cardboard UPS boxes and tape. “They won because of the clarity of their design idea and elegant solution they came up with in the building process,” said Darius Sollohub, an assistant professor at the New Jersey School of Architecture who judged the student projects, which were part of the school's Summer Architecture Career Exploration Program. >>
A group of 117 high school students will spend the day, and most of the night, at NJIT today building meditation rooms out of nothing more than cardboard boxes – namely, UPS boxes. The project is part of the New Jersey School of Architecture's Summer Architecture Career Exploration Program, a two-day intensive class that teaches students what it is like to attend architecture school. On July 7 at 10 a.m., a jury of architects will examine the finished projects and select a winner. >>
2004
The second of three sessions of the fourth annual New Jersey School of Architecture (SOA) Summer Architecture Career Exploration Program concluded today with an awards ceremony and closing remarks from NJSOA Dean Urs Gauchat. High school juniors and seniors with an interest in architecture participate in this intensive, two-day program. Students attended classes in design, computer graphics and drawing, plus built a learning center using UPS boxes. John J. Nallin, Vice President, United Parcel Service and a member of the NJIT Board of Overseers, donated more than 3,000 UPS boxes. >>
High school juniors and seniors with an interest in architecture participated in the first of two sessions of the fourth annual New Jersey School of Architecture Summer Architecture Career Exploration Program on June 29 and June 30, 2004. In addition to classes in design, computer graphics and drawing, students were assigned a hands-on project in which they were instructed to build a learning center using UPS boxes. The winning design, shown at left, was judged based on criteria including process and product, teamwork, and completing a project within a short time period.  “It was very difficult to choose the winning design,” said Darius Sollohub, assistant professor and associate director of the Master in Infrastructure Planning Program. >>