News

Looking for something?
Search Newsroom
RSS Feed

Stories Tagged with "sun"

Submit Search
2014 - 1 story
2013 - 3 stories
2012 - 7 stories
2011 - 7 stories
2010 - 5 stories
2009 - 8 stories
2008 - 7 stories
2007 - 3 stories
2006 - 2 stories
2005 - 1 story
2004 - 3 stories
2003 - 3 stories
2014
Two NJIT sports, women's tennis and men's soccer, have been invited to join and accepted membership in conferences whose championship team receives an automatic spot in the postseason NCAA Division I championship field. >>
2013
Researchers at NJIT's Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) in Big Bear, CA have obtained new and remarkably detailed photos of the Sun with the New Solar Telescope (NST).  The photographs reveal never-before-seen details of solar magnetism revealed in photospheric and chromospheric features.  >>
NJIT celebrates a new phase in the growth of its solar technology effort with the rededication of a research center as the China National Building Materials Photovoltaic Materials Research Center.  Expanding its previous work on Cadmium Telluride photocells with NJIT alumni-run Apollo Solar Energy, the new program addresses broader photocell technology and implementation studies.  >>
Inspiration, innovation and invention will be this year's theme for the annual campus-wide undergraduate research showcase on Feb. 6, 2013 from 2-6 p.m. in the second floor gallery and ballroom of the NJIT Campus Center.  >>
2012
With the goal of increasing the enrollment and retention of women students of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) at NJIT, the Society of Women Engineers (SWE) and Newark College of Engineering have joined forces to develop a new mentorship program for women in STEM.  >>
The Fifth International Summer Research Symposium was held today at NJIT to encourage more than three dozen students studying at NJIT to seek post-baccalaureate education in science, engineering and technology fields.  >>
On Saturday evening, February 25th, the major yearly fundraiser for the Concrete Industry Management (CIM) program was held at Valbella Restaurant in NYC.  >>
NJIT's College Goal Sunday is set this year for Feb. 19, 2012 (snow date March 4, 2012) from 1-4 p.m. in the second floor ballroom of NJIT's Campus Center.  >>
Basil C. Baltzis, PhD, professor of chemical, biological and pharmaceutical engineering, has been appointed associate dean of academic affairs at NJIT's Newark College of Engineering (NCE).  >>
2011
Vincent Lombardo, of Bayonne, has been named a new development director in the NJIT Office for University Advancement. >>
Felicia Sun, PhD '01, production engineer at the Ford Motor Company, will discuss "On Improving Fuel Efficiency of Hybrid Electric Vehicles" on Sept. 20, 4:30-5:30 p.m. in the ECE Building Room 202. >>
The Newark College of Engineering (NCE) at NJIT has been selected by the National Science Foundation (NSF) to participate as one of 20 universities and colleges across the nation in a new five-year program to keep students enrolled in engineering programs.  >>
In many ways, Daisy Gallegos, of Jersey City, represents the quintessential NJIT student.  Although born in this country, she is the daughter of immigrant parents who barely spoke a word of English when they arrived on these shores. >>
There's probably no topic more on the minds of parents of college age students than financial aid.  For many of these parents, and students, too, however, unraveling the mysteries of finding and securing the best financial aid package can be daunting.  >>
NJIT Distinguished Professor Philip R. Goode and the research team at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) have reported new insights into the small-scale dynamics of the Sun's photosphere. >>
Confounded by federal student loan applications?  If you are a low-income family, there is no reason to suffer alone. >>
2010
NJIT Assistant Professor Brooks Atwood, a principal in POD Design + Media, will have his work featured later this month in The Showtime House airing Dec. 26, 2010-Jan. 1, 2011.  >>
Sunil Saigal, PhD, dean of NJIT's Newark College of Engineering, was one of nine individuals honored for their achievements this weekend in the field at the 30th annual gala of the Society of Indian American Engineers and Architects (SIAEA). Founded about three decades ago as a non-profit body with a few dozen engineers, the society currently has some 700 members in New York and its neighboring states.   >>
Ali Akansu, PhD, professor of electrical and computer engineering and his former doctoral student Handan Agirman-Tosun, PhD, published the paper "Generalized Discrete Fourier Transform with Nonlinear Phase," in IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing, Vol. 58, No. 9, pp. 4547-4556, Sept. 2010.  This is a continuation of a number of contributions made by them on Generalized Discrete Fourier Transform. Akansu will also give a talk entitled "Generalized Discrete Fourier Transform with Nonlinear Phase: A Time-Frequency Method" on Oct. 20 at Purdue University . >>
Why sunspots are a strong source of radio emissions and what information those emissions carry will be the focus of an invited talk by NJIT Research Professor Jeongwoo Lee tomorrow at the International Astronomical Union Symposium on the Physics of Sun and Star Spots in Ventura, CA.  The event numbers among the top gatherings in the U.S. for people studying sunspots and related phenomena.    >>
Low-income students and their parents confused by the federal applications for financial aid for college, need no longer struggle. Mark your calendars for Sunday, Jan. 31, 2009 (snow date Feb. 21, 2009), when NJIT once again opens its doors for College Goal Sunday. >>
2009
Sunil Saigal, PhD, dean of NJIT's Newark College of Engineering, has been awarded the distinction of AAAS Fellow. Election as a Fellow is an honor bestowed upon AAAS members by their peers. >>
NJIT Professor Dale Gary, PhD, of Berkeley Heights, an expert in solar radio data, was promoted to distinguished professor.   Gary examines the conditions under which solar radio bursts from distinct solar events can disrupt cellular telephone signals. >>
Akash R. Shukla, an industrial engineering major at NJIT, celebrated on Sunday the release of his new book titled Measure of a Man, a personal account of his experience with limb-lengthening surgery and his year-long recovery. Attending the event were NJIT President Robert A. Altenkirch, Interim Provost Donald H. Sebastian, NCE Dean Sunil Saigal and Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Chair Rajpal S. Sodhi. For more information about Shukla's book, click here>>
NJIT's new 1.6-meter clear aperture solar telescope—the largest of its kind in the world—is now operational.  The unveiling of this remarkable instrument—said to be the pathfinder for all future, large ground-based telescopes—could not have come at a more auspicious moment for science.  This year marks the 400th anniversary of Galileo's telescope that he used to demonstrate that sunspots are indeed on the Sun.  >>
NJIT has been awarded a $10,000 College Access Challenge Grant which will be matched by the university. The grant aims to increase outreach and opportunities for higher education access. The program assists needy New Jersey families at the start of the financial aid process, by among other things, most importantly helping them complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). >>
Philip R. Goode, PhD, distinguished professor of physics at NJIT, will be inducted tonight into the New Jersey High-Tech Hall of Fame. The Hall of Fame was created in 1999 to recognize the best and the brightest New Jersey has to offer by honoring the achievements of life science and high-tech research and business leaders, educators, and government officials who have demonstrated exemplary work in innovative products and therapies.  Sponsors of the event are BioNJ, HINJ, and TechAmerica. >>
Jin Sun, PhD, a postdoctoral research associate in the Department of Chemical Engineering at Princeton University, will discuss "Constitutive Modeling of Dense Granular Flows" on April 15, 10-11:30 a.m. in the Mechanical Engineering Center 224. The lecture is part of the Granular and Multiphase Flows Colloquium Series sponsored by the Granular Science Laboratory at NJIT.  >>
Jin Sun, PhD, postdoctoral research associate in the Department of Chemical Engineering at Princeton University, will discuss "Constitutive Modeling of Dense Granular Flows" at the Granular and Multiphase Flows Spring 2009 Colloquium Series on March 2, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. in the Guttenberg Information Technologies Center Rm. 3740. >>
2008
If you are a student and you are considering attending NJIT, check out NJIT's Career Development Center (CDC) http://www.njit.edu/cds/ with the mission to help students find great jobs. Hundreds of top companies from around the region come to CDC's biannual fairs to recruit. CDC also helps students find internships and part-time jobs (co-ops) at these firms. >>
Sundar Subramanian, PhD, an associate professor in the Department of Mathematical Sciences at NJIT, will discuss "Survival Analysis: An Overview" on July 2 at 10 a.m. in Cullimore Hall Room 611. The lecture is part of the Department of Mathematical Sciences Summer Program Seminar Series at NJIT. >>
Paul Dupiano, of Union, and Sunny Patel, of Morganville, both electrical engineering majors at NJIT, have been awarded $5,000 scholarships from the National Consortium of MASINT Research (NCMR) Scholars Program. NCMR's scholarship program was established to encourage future scientists to consider technical career paths within the intelligence community. Scholarship funds assist promising undergraduate juniors and seniors with tuition, textbooks, room and board. >>
The new issue of NJIT Magazine is now available on line. The issue's cover feature is an interview with NCE Dean Sunil Saigal. A limited number of paper copies are also available to NJIT faculty, students and staff. Copies may be obtained at the Office of University Communications on the fourth floor of Fenster Hall. Copies for mail delivery on campus may be requested by contacting Rosalyn Roberts. >>
Sankaran Sundaresan, PhD, professor in the department of chemical engineering at Princeton University, will discuss "Coarse-Grained Two-Fluid Models for Gas-Flows" on March 10 at 2:45 p.m. in Kupfrian Hall Room 117. The lecture is the seventh in the Spring 2008 Chemical Engineering Department Seminar Series at NJIT. >>
An open house and robotics demonstration of cutting-edge manufacturing processes will showcase the new Vincent A. Stabile Laboratory at NJIT's Newark College of Engineering (NCE) on Feb. 20, 2008 from 1 p.m.- 4:30 p.m. >>
2007
Tiffany Small, systems manager of NJIT's Office of International Students and Faculty (OIS&F), served as the program chair for the fsaATLAS track for the March 2007 SunGard Summit conference. This is only the second year that SunGard Higher Education has had a track solely dedicated to its fsaATLAS software, used by OIS&F and the Office of University Admissions to report international student and exchange visitor data to the Department of Homeland Security. As a result of her efforts, the number and variety of fsaATLAS sessions increased, as well as the number of session attendees. >>
Sunil Saigal, PhD, PE, has been appointed dean and distinguished professor with tenure in the department of civil and environmental engineering at Newark College of Engineering at New Jersey Institute of Technology. >>
Sundar Subramanian, PhD, an associate professor in the department of mathematics and statistics at the University of Maine, will discuss "Censored Median Regression Models" on Jan. 29 at 11:30 a.m. in Cullimore Hall, Room 611. >>
2006
Once again, the NJIT Technology and Society Forum will present speakers whose ideas excite and challenge. The first lecture, “Creative Thinking and Problem Solving, An Essential Skill for the New Millennium,” is set for Sept. 27, 3-4:30 p.m. in the NJIT Campus Center Ballroom. Gerard J. Puccio, PhD, the department chair and professor of the International Center for Studies in Creativity at Buffalo State, SUNY, will explore the nature of creativity and how people may enhance their potential for thinking. >>
Less sunlight reaching the Earth's surface has not translated into cooler temperatures, according to a team of solar physicists at NJIT. The scientists have observed that the amount of light reflected by Earth has increased since 2000. “Our findings have significant implications for the study of climate change,” said Philip R. Goode, PhD, principal investigator and distinguished professor of physics at NJIT. >>
2005
NJIT President Robert A. Altenkirch has asked the university community to consider responding to the epic devastation caused by the tsunami disaster through support of a fund that has been created for rescue and recovery efforts. Those who choose to contribute should send or bring funds to the Dean of Students Office. Checks should be made out to “NJIT Tsunami Relief Fund.”  These funds will be sent to the American Red Cross, which is assisting with the rescue and recovery efforts. >>
2004
CyberExtruder, a 3-D biometrics company, has developed a computer software program that will allow cell phone users to pass a cyber baton through their mobile telephones. The baton will feature a 3-D animated photograph of them.   Samsung Electronics Europe will employ the technology in a cell phone relay race running May 17 to July 31, 2004, in tandem with the Summer Olympics in Greece.  Cell phone users in England, Germany, France, Spain, Greece and Italy will have access to the fun. >>
If you've ever wanted to learn more about the sun's 10-billion-year life cycle, don't miss "Solar Fireworks," an easy-to-understand new science exhibit about the sun and solar system, on view May 15, 2004, through May 29, 2005, at the Newark Museum. The exhibit is a collaborative effort between astronomers at the museum and Haimin Wang and Carsten Denker, NJIT professors of physics. >>
If you've ever wanted to know more about the sun's 10-billion year life cycle, don't miss “Solar Fireworks,” an easy-to-understand new science exhibit about the sun and solar system,  on view May 15, 2004, through May 29, 2005, at the Newark Museum.    The exhibit is a collaborative effort between astronomers at the museum and Haimin Wang and Carsten Denker, professors of physics, at New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT).  Wang and Denker designed and wrote the easy-to-understand display that includes installations, computer animations and even a touch-and-tell plasma globe.  Wang obtained the show's funding -- a $30,000 grant from NASA's Office of Space Science Education/Public Outreach Program.  The exhibit is open Wednesdays through Sundays, noon-5 p.m., in the Prudential Foundation Gallery of the Victoria Hall of Science at the museum. >>
2003
When the Voyager I space craft was launched more than 26 years ago, it carried an instrument designed to analyze the charged particles it encountered in space. That included particles around the outer planets Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Pluto as well as those in the interplanetary medium. >>
Newark, N.J.--The "weather" in space may have just gotten a bit more predictable. Using new digital equipment, a team of NJIT researchers has gotten a better look at the surface of the sun and what happens to it both before and during solar flares. Working at NJIT's Big Bear Solar Observatory in California, a team led by physics professor Haimin Wang, Ph.D., produced a series of new images. They show for the first time that rapid changes in the magnetic fields emanating from the sun's surface are associated with flares and mass ejections of energy from the sun's corona. These eruptions are typically near areas known as "sunspots", which appear dark through telescopes because they have a lower surface temperature than that of their surrounding surface. "This is good news for the researchers of space weather, because our information will enable scientists in industry and government to better understand and predict the likelihood of flares and prepare for and mitigate adverse consequences," says Wang. Wang is scheduled to present the findings this week at the American Astronomical Society's solar physics division meeting at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD. Solar flares are violent eruptions that send electromagnetic radiation into space, ultimately causing problems on earth by disrupting the atmosphere. The flare-ups can interfere with satellite-based communications and television and radio broadcasts. That can mean disruptions in cell-phone service and flight communications. Wang and colleagues produced images showing how the sun's surface changed during an after a flare. The research should enable scientists to predict when solar flares will erupt, how disruptive they will be, and how long they will last, he says. Crucial to producing the images was a new imaging system known as a "digital magnetograph system" built by NJIT doctoral student Tom Spirock. The team's work was also supported by grants from NASA, the National Science Foundation, and the Office of Naval Research. >>
A solar research team from New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) has discovered new information about the sun's surface, known as the photosphere. Haimin Wang, Ph.D., professor of physics at NJIT, who led this team, detected rapid changes last July in magnetic fields on the sun's surface. Such rapid changes are associated with flares and coronal mass ejections (CME). >>
Tagged: physics, haimin wang, sun