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2014 - 1 story
2012 - 1 story
2011 - 1 story
2009 - 1 story
2008 - 1 story
2007 - 1 story
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2003 - 1 story
2014
NJIT Distinguished Research Professor of Physics Louis J. Lanzerotti recently received an award from the American Meteorological Society (AMS) for “Sustained Leadership and Contributions to the Space Weather Enterprise and Creative Stewardship of the Space Weather Journal.”  >>
2012
NJIT Distinguished Research Professor and former Bell Labs scientist Louis J. Lanzerotti, will see his 50-year quest to better understand space weather and Earth's Van Allen Radiation Belts rocket, once again, into space on Aug. 23, 2012.  >>
2011
An 18-member group from the China Meteorological Administration spent time at NJIT during an extensive U.S. educational and exchange program on weather disaster emergency management. >>
2009
Haimin Wang, of Livingston, an NJIT professor, whose work focuses on the physics behind space weather in order to predict unexpected and unwanted solar activities and their effect on Earth, has received the NJIT Excellence in Research Award. >>
2008
AIG in conjunction with the New Jersey Business Force (of which NJIT is a member) will conduct a one-day symposium on July 14 in NJIT's Campus Center Atrium to address the implications of a Category 3 hurricane on critical infrastructure in the NYC/NJ region. James Eberwine, Lead Forecaster at the National Weather Service in Mount Holly, NJ will be the keynote speaker. For registration and additional information, contact Col. (Ret.) Hank Straub, 609-577-5373, hstraub@bens.org. >>
2007
The safety of technologies and humans in space, based on weather, is of special interest to Lanzerotti, who in 2006 was the principal investigator for instruments on the new NASA Radiation Belts Storm Probes mission to investigate Earth's Van Allen radiation belts.  >>
2004
A book exploring the sun and interplanetary space co-edited by NJIT Professor of Physics Dale Gary, PhD was released this past week. Solar and Space Weather Radiophysics Current Status and Future Developments, published by Springer Publishing Company, is a 400-page hard-cover text that is part of a series about astrophysics and space science. >>
2003
Newark, N.J.--The "weather" in space may have just gotten a bit more predictable. Using new digital equipment, a team of NJIT researchers has gotten a better look at the surface of the sun and what happens to it both before and during solar flares. Working at NJIT's Big Bear Solar Observatory in California, a team led by physics professor Haimin Wang, Ph.D., produced a series of new images. They show for the first time that rapid changes in the magnetic fields emanating from the sun's surface are associated with flares and mass ejections of energy from the sun's corona. These eruptions are typically near areas known as "sunspots", which appear dark through telescopes because they have a lower surface temperature than that of their surrounding surface. "This is good news for the researchers of space weather, because our information will enable scientists in industry and government to better understand and predict the likelihood of flares and prepare for and mitigate adverse consequences," says Wang. Wang is scheduled to present the findings this week at the American Astronomical Society's solar physics division meeting at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD. Solar flares are violent eruptions that send electromagnetic radiation into space, ultimately causing problems on earth by disrupting the atmosphere. The flare-ups can interfere with satellite-based communications and television and radio broadcasts. That can mean disruptions in cell-phone service and flight communications. Wang and colleagues produced images showing how the sun's surface changed during an after a flare. The research should enable scientists to predict when solar flares will erupt, how disruptive they will be, and how long they will last, he says. Crucial to producing the images was a new imaging system known as a "digital magnetograph system" built by NJIT doctoral student Tom Spirock. The team's work was also supported by grants from NASA, the National Science Foundation, and the Office of Naval Research. >>