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Stories Tagged with "architecture" from 2005

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2005
Darius Sollohub, an assistant professor of architecture at NJIT who along with his students has worked to revitalize towns and cities across the state, was named Educator of the Year by the Northern New Jersey District Council of the Urban Land Institute. >>
Laurie Hawkinson, an associate professor of architecture at Columbia University and a partner in the Smith-Miller + Hawkinson design firm, will discuss her recent work on Nov. 7 at 5:30 p.m. in the Weston Lecture Hall of New Jersey School of Architecture (NJSOA). The event, which is free and open to the public, is the fifth in the NJSOA's Fall Lecture Series. For more information or reservations, call 973-596-3080. >>
During a lecture at New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), the environmental architect and designer William McDonough asked, “How do we love all children of all species for all time?” >>
"A Critic's Obsession" is the topic of a talk by Robert Campbell, Pulitzer-Prize winning critic for the Boston Globe, on Oct. 24 at 5:30 p.m. in the Weston Lecture Hall of New Jersey School of Architecture (NJSOA). The event, which is free and open to the public, is the fourth in the NJSOA's Fall Lecture Series. For more information or reservations, call 973-596-3080. >>
Michael Mostoller, a distinguished professor at the New Jersey School of Architecture, New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), was named a master teacher during university convocation, NJIT's annual fall awards ceremony. >>
Erica D'Almeida, a senior majoring in architecture at New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), received a Presidential Leadership Award during university convocation. The award recognizes students who have shown a deep commitment to NJIT. >>
One day last year, Matt Gosser, who teaches architectural graphics at NJIT, read that the Pabst Brewery was being demolished. But when Gosser walked inside the brewery, he found a treasure trove of objects: original architectural drawings; engineering drawings; machine parts; and metal work. Sixteen months later, the New Jersey School of Architecture (NJSOA) gallery at NJIT is hosting “AR+CHAEOLOGY: The Death and After-life of the Pabst Brewery,” an exhibit featuring sculpture, furniture and collages that Gosser made from objects he found in the brewery. “We feel that Gosser's exhibit is historic and reflects an important part of Newark's history and economic development,” said James Dyer, associate dean at NJSOA. >>
Renowned Virginia architect and designer William McDonough will speak Oct. 26 at NJIT about how the use of technology is integral to its creation, application and value. His talk is entitled, “Tools of Intention, Tools of Value” and will take place from 3-4:30 p.m. in the atrium of the NJIT Campus Center. The talk is free and open to the public and parking is available. For more information, call Jay Kappraff at (973) 596-3490. >>
Ralph Jackson, a principal in the Shepley Bulfinch Richardson and Abbott architectural firm in Boston, will discuss his recent work on October 3 at 5:30 p.m. in the Weston Lecture Hall of New Jersey School of Architecture (NJSOA). The event, which is free and open to the public, is the second in the NJSOA's Fall Lecture Series. For more information or reservations, call 973-596-3080. >>
New Jersey Institute of Technology's (NJIT) new architectural curriculum received high praise from Campus Technology magazine. In the magazine's August issue, NJIT was recognized for allowing freshmen architecture students to work immediately with electronic digital media in their design studio classes. >>
A group of high school students from New Jersey, New York and Maryland won an architectural design competition held recently at NJIT with an unusual twist: The students had to design and build a meditation room out of nothing more than cardboard UPS boxes and tape. “They won because of the clarity of their design idea and elegant solution they came up with in the building process,” said Darius Sollohub, an assistant professor at the New Jersey School of Architecture who judged the student projects, which were part of the school's Summer Architecture Career Exploration Program. >>
A group of 117 high school students will spend the day, and most of the night, at NJIT today building meditation rooms out of nothing more than cardboard boxes – namely, UPS boxes. The project is part of the New Jersey School of Architecture's Summer Architecture Career Exploration Program, a two-day intensive class that teaches students what it is like to attend architecture school. On July 7 at 10 a.m., a jury of architects will examine the finished projects and select a winner. >>
A team of architecture students from New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) is helping to redevelop one of the state's oldest cities: Paterson. The students, all of whom attend the New Jersey School of Architecture (NJSOA) at NJIT, recently briefed Paterson officials on their plan to redesign nine neighborhoods in the city. And on May 17, starting at 6:30 p.m., the students will present their plan to the Paterson City Council.  >>
Wassim Jabi, PhD, assistant professor in the New Jersey School of Architecture (NJSOA) at NJIT, was elected president of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA), the main group in North America for educators and researchers working in computer-aided architectural design. “NJSOA has been a long-time national leader in computer-aided design,” Jabi said, “and it's a great honor to be the third professor from NJSOA to lead ACADIA." >>
Nine teams of architecture students, all sophomores at the New Jersey School of Architecture, competed recently in a masonry competition, with four teams winning nearly $20,000 in prize money. Using masonry elements such as brick, mortar and concrete, the students built parts of small cultural centers. Forty masons spent two days teaching the students building techniques. The first-place team, whose winning design is shown at left, will share a $7,500 prize. >>
This weekend, a team of 40 masonry craftsmen will visit New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) to teach more than 100 architecture students how to build walls using techniques such as plastering, mortaring, and laying and cutting brick. The students, divided into nine teams, will compete in the Masonry Design Build Competition, in which they must build parts of a cultural center. >>
How does an invention move through the several steps from invention to commercialization? This topic will be explored in “The Invention Process Lifecycle: A Panel” on March 30, 2005, 2:30-4 p.m. in Weston Hall, School of Architecture, Lecture Room 1. The colloquium will feature presentations by Raymond P. Thek, JD (at left), who will discuss the legal aspects of inventions, and Harvey D. Homan, PhD, president and chief executive officer of Urovalve, Inc. The colloquium is free and open to the public. >>
The New Jersey School of Architecture (NJSOA) Gallery at NJIT is hosting a special exhibit of set design material by Vern H. Smith, featuring theatrical stage models, sketches, watercolors, and photographs from plays and musicals presented at Theatre in the Park in Edison, at the Rutgers Bradley Hall Theatre and at NJIT's Jim Wise Theatre. The exhibit, which will be on display through March 31, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m., demonstrates the principles of creative art and design that Smith taught and put into practice in his work.   Smith has donated the material to the NJIT-Rutgers Theatre Program, so that after the exhibit closes, it will be archived and made available in NJIT's Jim Wise Theatre Library. >>
Kim Vierheilig, who graduated from the School of Architecture at New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), received the Intern Architect of the Year Award from the American Institute of Architects (AIA). She received the award during a recent reception at the Newark Museum. >>
Environmental psychologist Richard Olsen, PhD, a research professor at New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), has developed 16 easy and affordable ways people can make their homes safer and more comfortable.  The information may help baby boomers planning retirement homes.  Olsen regularly studies ways to improve living environments for the aging and people with disabilities and Alzheimer's disease.“Our studies consistently illustrate that with several simple, relatively inexpensive modifications such as reorganizing the kitchen cabinets or installing anti-skid strips on the stair tread, people can create safer and more comfortable living environments,” said Olsen who also directs the health and aging division at NJIT's Center for Architecture and Building Science Research. >>
Students from the New Jersey School of Architecture won both first place and honorable mention in the student section of the building division of the 2004 Autodesk Innovation Awards competition. First-place award went to fifth-year undergraduate student Elliot Glassman for his proposed River Vale Public Safety Complex (at left) created in the design studio of Professor Glenn Goldman. Graduate student Hector Camps won honorable mention for his project, a proposed addition to the Uffizi Gallery created in the design studio of Professor M. Stephen Zdepski. >>
Darius Sollohub, assistant professor and associate director of infrastructure planning, New Jersey School of Architecture, was interviewed last week on WBGO for a story on proposed development in Bergen County. Thomas Wright, an adjunct member of the architecture faculty, also provided comments. >>