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Stories Tagged with "bs" from 2006

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2014 - 6 stories
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2006
New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) will make available live color photos illustrating the rare Transit of Mercury. Big Bear Solar Observatory, Big Bear, Calif., managed and operated by NJIT, will begin capturing these images at 2 p.m. E.S.T. using its 6 inch (15 centimeter) Singer Full-Disk Telescope. The telescope will use a special filter to look at chromosphere, a layer in the solar atmosphere about a thousand miles above the sun's visible surface. >>
Bogdan Georgescu, PhD, of Siemens Research Labs will discuss "Database-Guided Segmentation of Anatomical Structures with Complex Appearance" on Oct. 4, 2:30-3:30 p.m., in the Guttenberg Information Technologies Center, Rm. 4415. >>
If you're still wondering why Pluto is no longer a planet, head over Friday night to the weekly meeting of the Amateur Astronomers, Inc. in Cranford. Astrophysicist Dale Gary, PhD, professor and chair of the physics department at NJIT will decode the mystery of recent events in Prague. Gary speaks at 8:30 p.m. at the William Miller Sperry Observatory at Union County College. >>
Tagged: physics, dale gary
Starting this fall, students at New Jersey City University (NJCU) can begin working on master's degrees in computer science or information systems from NJIT, while completing their bachelor's degrees at NJCU. NJIT and NJCU signed an agreement to offer the new degree program yesterday at NJCU. “Inter-institutional cooperation between NJCU and NJIT will have a positive impact on students interested in computer science and information systems, who in five years can have both bachelor's and master's degrees in these fields,” said NJIT President Robert Altenkirch. “The joint degree will be a great advantage to these students both intellectually as well as when they enter the job market.” >>
Starting this fall, William Paterson University (WPU) students can start working on master's degrees in computer science or math from NJIT while completing their bachelor's degrees at WPU. “This new agreement will allow William Paterson students and alumni as well as professionals who live or work near the WPU campus to advance their educations without leaving their backyards,” said Gale Tenen Spak, associate vice president of Continuing and Distance Learning Education at NJIT. >>
Atam P. Dhawan, PhD, professor and chair of the department of electrical and computer engineering at NJIT, was named the conference chair of  the 28th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBS). The event will be held August 30-Sept. 3 in New York City. >>
Tagged: ieee, atam dhawan
How the study of Earthshine continues to elucidate climate variables and how the use of Earthshine data may help to search for advanced life on distant planets, will be the foci of an upcoming panel discussion in Baltimore led by solar physicist Philip R. Goode, PhD, and a panel of researchers. Goode, distinguished professor at NJIT and director of Big Bear Solar Observatory, Calif., leads the talk on May 23 at 10 a.m. during the 2006 joint assembly of six geophysical societies. >>
Three high schools took top awards during a website-design contest held March 14 at NJIT. Twenty-one schools and 150 students from the metropolitan region competed in the contest, sponsored by NJIT's Department of Information Systems. A team from Henry Hudson Regional High School (at left) took first place for designing a prototype for a teaching website. >>
Matt Gosser, an adjunct instructor of architecture at New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), will be honored by the Newark Preservation and Landmarks Committee for making furniture, sculpture and art from objects he salvaged at the former Pabst Brewery. >>
Less sunlight reaching the Earth's surface has not translated into cooler temperatures, according to a team of solar physicists at NJIT. The scientists have observed that the amount of light reflected by Earth has increased since 2000. “Our findings have significant implications for the study of climate change,” said Philip R. Goode, PhD, principal investigator and distinguished professor of physics at NJIT. >>