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Stories Tagged with "bot" from 2010

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2013 - 6 stories
2012 - 1 story
2011 - 2 stories
2010 - 9 stories
2009 - 5 stories
2008 - 5 stories
2007 - 1 story
2006 - 4 stories
2005 - 4 stories
2003 - 1 story
2010
Sergei Adamovich, PhD, associate professor in the department of biomedical engineering at NJIT, co-authored "Integrated Arm and Hand Training Using Adaptive Robotics and Virtual Reality Simulations," which won the Best Paper Award at the VIII International Conference on Disability, Virtual Reality and Associated Technologies in Valparaiso, Chile.  >>
An expert in digital data forensics and information assurance, Yun-Qing Shi, a professor of electrical and computer engineering at NJIT, will number among 30 New Jersey inventors from eight companies and universities to be honored at the upcoming 2010 Thomas Alva Edison Patent Awards on Nov. 4. Hosted by the Research & Development Council of New Jersey, the ceremony and reception will take place at the Liberty Science Center.    >>
NJIT professors and alumni will be among the innovators honored this evening at the 22nd Annual New Jersey Inventors Hall of Fame Awards ceremony in Hoboken. Timothy Chang, PhD, distinguished professor of electrical and computer engineering, will receive a Special Award for his achievements in the areas of ultra-high precision systems, genetic systems, robotics and motion control; and Yun-Qing Shi, PhD, professor of electrical and computer engineering, will be recognized for his work in digital forensics and security. Jingjing Zhang, a PhD candidate in NJIT's Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, will receive the Graduate Student Award. Vikki Hazelwood, PhD, who received her MS from NJIT in 1998, will receive the Advancement of Invention Award for a pioneering process for translational research in medicine and Richard Caizza, who received a certificate in plastics technology from NJIT in 1992, will receive the Inventor of the Year award for his "Single-Handedly Actuatable Safety Shield for Needles" patent. >>
Tagged: award
Sergei Adamovich, PhD, associate professor in NJIT's Department of Biomedical Engineering, gave an invited lecture last week at the meeting of the American Academy of Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine in Washington, DC. He participated in a panel of six experts from the US, Canada and Europe to share his views on future trends in pediatric rehabilitation. The topic of his presentation to a large audience of pediatricians and physical/occupational therapists was the use of technology (robotics and virtual reality) in rehabilitation of arm movement in children with cerebral palsy.  >>
Ian Lafond, a second-year PhD student in NJIT's Department of Biomedical Engineering, has received a Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award for Individual Predoctoral Fellowship from the National Institutes of Health. This $142,000 award will support Ian's dissertation research in the lab of Associate Professor Sergei Adamovich over the next four years. >>
Netflix Contest winners, AT&T researchers Bob Bell and Chris Volinsky, recently told 22 science and technology teachers from throughout New Jersey that collaboration was key to winning the prize money. The occasion was a teacher luncheon, wrapping up a three-day conference at NJIT highlighting the use of robots in science, math and technology classes. The NJIT Center for Pre-College Programs hosted the event, thanks to Netflix prize money won by a team led by Bell and Volinsky and donated last year to NJIT by AT&T.  Teachers walked away with teaching ideas, plus Lego Mind Storm sets to continue building robots back in their classrooms. “My kids are going to be so excited that we now have this kit,” said Rich Bettini, a technology teacher at West Essex High School, North Caldwell, who participated in the learning session. Conference organizer Howard Kimmel, director of the NJIT Center, said that robots were a great way to introduce science and math materials in a multi-disciplinary way to students. “When you design a robot you also teach algebra,” he said. “We also love them because they are a hands-on learning tool, something which always enhances learning.” >>
Helping stroke patients regain use of their hands and arms through innovative robotic and virtual reality-based video game therapies is the focal point of NJIT Associate Professor Sergei Adamovich, a biomedical engineer. Thanks to a $1.3 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Adamovich is developing better ways to rehabilitate people who have lost control of their hands, fingers, shoulders and elbows.   >>
It was the night before the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Annual Student Design Competition and NJIT senior Mike Lowry, of Parsippany, was stumped. His single-stream recycling machine, Rufus, nicknamed after NJIT's green mascot, couldn't distinguish cans from bottles, a possible cause for disqualification. >>
NJIT President Robert A. Altenkirch addressed student teams representing 30 New Jersey public and private high schools last week at the 2010 Panasonic Creative Design Challenge finals at the New Jersey Performing Arts Center. For this year's challenge, teams designed and built a remote-controlled robotic recycling plant to help sort through debris in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. NJIT makes significant contributions to this science and engineering technology competition: Three NJIT student interns develop the Challenge, while NJIT staff score the written reports as well as provide judges for the performance and oral presentations.   >>