ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY - SURVEYING ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY

A surveyor is a professional person with the academic qualifications and technical expertise to practice the science of measurement; to assemble and assess land and geographic related information; to use that information for the purpose of planning and implementing the efficient administration of the land, the sea and structures thereon; and to instigate the advancement and development of such practices.

 

 

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Related Career Titles for Surveying Engineering Technology

Government Surveyors

Engineering Consultants

Private Surveyor

Land Surveyor

Survey Crew Chief

Mapping Technician

Zoning Plans Examiner

Software Consultant

Survey Technician

Survey Engineer

Instrument Operator

Field Surveyor

Survey Computers

GPS Survey Technician

Project Surveyor

Project Manager

Military Official

 CAD Technician

Survey Party Chief

Topographic Surveyor

Surveying Manager

Technical Writer

Customer Service Representative

Non-technical Sales

Manager of Information Systems

Management Trainee

Technical Educator or Trainer

College and University Professor

High School Teacher

Public Accountant

Private Accountant

Banker

High School Teachers

College and University Professor

 

 

 

Industries That Hire Surveying Engineering Technology Majors

Building, Developing, & General Contracting Services

Communication Services

Consulting Services

Electrical Equipment, Appliance, & Component Manufacturing.

Engineering Services

Federal Government

State and Local Governments

Mining

Petroleum & Coal Product Manufacturers

Military Services

Real Estate

Scientific Research & Development Services.

Transportation Services

Transportation Equipment

 Ocean and Marine Sciences

Consulting Companies

Waste Management Services

Computer Companies

Mapping Services

Construction Companies

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

High Schools

Colleges and Universities

Banks

Utilities

Wood Products

Environmental Services

FEMA

 

 

 

 

Web Sites For Surveying Engineering Technology Majors

 

SurveyNet

 

Land Surveyor Reference Page

 

The Technology Interface

 

NICET Online: National Institute for Certification in Engineering Technologies

 

The American Society of Engineering Technology

 

 

Resources in the Career Resource Center

 

BOOKS

 

  • VGM’s Handbook of Scientific & Technical Careers
  • Career Advancement and Survival for Engineers
  • The Career Connection II
  • Careers in Science and Engineering
  • Job Opportunities in Engineering and Technology ’94
  • Job Opportunities in Business ’94
  • Career Information Center: Engineering, Science, and Technology
  • Career Information Center: Manufacturing
  • Career Information Center: Employment Trends and Master Index
  • IEEE Marketing for Engineers
  • IEEE Writing for Career Growth
  • IEEE Presentations that Work
  • IEEE Building Internal Team Partnerships
  • IEEE Teaching on TV and Video
  • IEEE Starting a High Tech Company
  • IEEE High Tech Creativity
  • IEEE Working in a Global Environment
  • Job Opportunities in Business ’95
  • Job Opportunities in Engineering and Technology ’95
  • Job Opportunities in The Environment ’95
  • Environmental Jobs for Scientists and Engineers
  • The Complete Guide for Occupational Exploration
  • The O*Net Dictionary of Occupational Titles

FOLDERS

 

  • All Majors
  • Engineering Technology

STATISTICS AND ACTUARIAL SCIENCE

Statistics deals with techniques for collecting and analyzing numerical data for the purpose of solving real-life problems. Statistical techniques are widely used in the pharmaceutical industry, engineering, education, political science, medicine and many other areas. Actuarial science is concerned with the application of mathematical probability to the design of financially sound insurance and pension programs.

 

 

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Related Career Titles for Statistics and Actuarial Science

Financial Analyst

Actuary

Actuarial Analyst

Statistician

Consultant

Management Trainee

Fundraiser

Underwriter

Accountant

Banker

Stock Broker

Claims Representative

Salesperson

Research Scientist

 Account Manager

Opinion Research Specialist

Biometrician

Data Analyst

Research Engineer

Programmer

College/University Professor

High School Teacher

Technical Writer

Numerical Analyst

Project Manager

Business Development Manager

Marketing Analyst

 

 

 

 

Industries That Hire Statistics and Actuarial Science Majors

Pharmaceutical Companies

Insurance Firms

Engineering Firms

Federal Government

Local Government

Legal Services

Social Services

Hospitals

Human Resources Departments

Banking

Communication Services

Consulting Services

Financial Services (Securities, Commodity Contracts, & Other Financial Investments)

Transportation Equipment

Transportation Equipment Companies

Waste Management & Remediation Services

Utilities

Advertising Agencies

Building and Construction Companies

Colleges/Universities

Accounting, Tax Preparation, Bookkeeping, & Payroll

Computer and Electronic Products Companies

Computer Systems Design/Computer Consulting

Employment Services

Federal Government

State and Local Government

Publishing (Newspaper, Periodical, Book, & Data Base Publishers)

Real Estate

Religious, Grant writing, Civic, Professional, & Similar Organizations

Scientific Research & Development Services

Transportation Services

 

 

 

 

Web Sites for Statistics and Actuarial Science Majors

 

Actuarial Career Information

 

The Actuarial Foundation

 

The American Academy of Actuaries

 

American Statistical Association

 

 

Resources in the Career Resource Center

 

BOOKS

 

  • VGM’s Handbook of Scientific and Technical Careers
  • Job Opportunities in Health Care ’94
  • Careers In Science and Engineering
  • Job Opportunities in Business ’94
  • Career Information Center: Administration, Business, and Office
  • Career Information Center: Engineering, Science, and Technology
  • Career Information Center: Marketing and Distribution
  • Career Information Center: Transportation
  • Career Information Center: Employment Trends and Master Index
  • Green At Work
  • Job Opportunities in Business ’95
  • Job Opportunities in Engineering and Technology ’95
  • Job Opportunities in Health Care ’95
  • The Complete Guide to Occupational Exploration
  • The Princeton Review Guide To Your Career 1997
  • The O*Net Dictionary of Occupational Titles

FOLDERS

 

  • All Majors
  • Statistics and Actuarial Science

SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIETY

The Science, Technology, and Society program explores the foundations and impact of science and technology by examining the values, language, history, politics, and economics of modern technological society. Graduates find employment in such areas as government, corporate planning, public policy, urban development, technology assessment, writing and editing, and environmental planning.

 

 

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Related Career Titles for Science, Technology, and Society

Geochemist

Microbiologist

Ecologist

Park Ranger

Forester

Economist

Wildlife Manager

Watershed Manager

Range Manager

Environmental Engineer

Waste Management Engineer

Industrial Hygienist

Social Scientist

Policy Analyst

Lawyer

Military Officer

Management Trainee

College/University Professor

High School Teacher

Fundraiser

Grant Writer

Environmental Writer

Technical Writer

Consultant

Advertiser

Market Researcher

Community Relations Specialist

Urban Planner

Planning Director

Resource Manager

Environmental Planner

Transportation Planner

Researcher

Zoning Representative

 

 

 

Industries That Hire Science, Technology, and Society Majors

Parks and Outdoor Recreation

High Schools

Colleges and Universities

Environmental Education Centers

Air Quality Management Facilities

Water Quality Management

Communication Companies

Solid Waste Management Facilities

Law Offices

Real Estate

Forest Conservation Centers

Environmental Protection Agency

Military Services

Social Services

Land Conservation Facilities

 Water Conservation Facilities

Publishing Companies

Hazardous Waste Management Facilities

Recycling Centers

Urban Planning Centers

Broadcast Media

Federal Government

State and Local Government

Transportation Services

Financial Services

Wilderness Protection Services

Consulting Firms

Transportation Services

Advertising Agencies

Building and Construction Companies

 

 

 

Web Sites for Science, Technology, and Society Majors

 

American Planning Association

 

EnvironmentalCareer.com

 

Science, Technology, and Society Links

 

 

Resources in the Career Resource Center

 

BOOKS

 

  • VGM’s Handbook of Scientific and Technical Careers
  • Job Opportunities in Health Care ’94
  • Careers In Science and Engineering
  • Job Opportunities in Engineering and Technology ‘94
  • Jobs You Can Live With
  • Job Opportunities in Business ’94
  • Career Information Center: Agribusiness, Environment, and Natural Resources
  • Career Information Center: Engineering, Science, and Technology
  • Career Information Center: Public and Community Services
  • The New Complete To Environmental Careers
  • Green At Work
  • Job Opportunities in Business ’95
  • Job Opportunities in Engineering and Technology ’95
  • Job Opportunities in the Environment ’95
  • Job Opportunities in Health Care ’95
  • Environmental Jobs for Scientists
  • The Complete Guide for Occupational Exploration
  • The Princeton Review Guide to Your Career 1997
  • The O*Net Dictionary of Occupational Titles

FOLDERS

 

  • All Majors
  • Science, Technology, and Society

 

TRANSPORTATION

Transportation functions in a very complex environment that is characterized by constant change in the technological, regulatory and legal frameworks. Transportation professionals must not only be able to meet the technological challenges of new systems, they must also be capable of fitting these systems into the social, economic, and physical environments in a manner that improves the quality of life for all. The Transportation program prepares students to be transportation planners, engineers, and managers who can plan, design, operate, and manage transportation systems capable of satisfying society’s transportation needs.

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Related Career Titles for Transportation

Civil Engineer

Highway and Bridge Design

Project Manager

Area Director

Traffic Engineer

Transportation Planner

Traffic Engineering Technician

CADD Technician

Urban Transportation Engineers

Traffic Signal Engineer

Transit Planner

Systems Analyst

Airport Engineer

Senior Planner

Airport Planner

Construction Engineer

College/University Professor

 Permit Agent

Community Planner

Air Traffic Controller

Air Quality Specialist

Salesperson

Consultant

Urban/Regional Planner

Project Engineer

Research & Development Specialist

Test Engineer

Highway Engineer

Structural Engineer

Surveying Technician

Design Engineer

High School Teacher

Management Trainee

 

Industries That Hire Transportation Majors

Aerospace Product and Parts Manufacturers

Architectural Services

Building, Developing, & General Contracting Services

Communication Services

Computer and Electronic Products Manufacturers

Computer Systems Design/Computer Consulting Services

Consulting Services

Colleges/Universities

High Schools

Electrical Equipment, Appliance, & Component Manufacturers

Engineering Services

Federal Government

State and Local Government

Scientific Research & Development Services

Urban Planning Centers

Transportation Services

Department of Transportation

Transportation Equipment Manufacturers

Utilities Services

Waste Management & Remediation Services

Airports

US Military

Train/Transit Systems

 

Web Sites for Transportation Majors

Careers In Transportation (DOT)

Institute of Transportation Engineers

Global Careers-Transportation

Right of Way

 

 

Resources in the Career Resource Center

BOOKS

  • Careers In Science and Engineering
  • The Career Connection II
  • Job Opportunities in Engineering and Technology ’94
  • Job Opportunities in Business ’94
  • Career Information Center: Transportation
  • Career Information Center: Employment Trends and Master Index
  • Job Opportunities in Business ’95
  • Job Opportunities in Engineering and Technology ’95
  • Job Opportunities in the Environment ’95
  • The Complete Guide for Occupational Exploration
  • The O*Net Guide to Occupational Titles

FOLDERS

  • All Majors
  • Transportation

Developing a Winning Resume

Resume Formats

There is no "perfect" or "right" resume format.  The format you choose will depend upon the job you hope to find and your past experiences.  Listed below are different resume formats.   Look them over and determine what format or combination of formats will present you in the best possible light.  Remember the purpose of a resume is to get you a job interview.  The interview gets you the job.

General Resume Guidelines

The following guidelines are just that-guidelines for what to include in a good resume.  Remember, your résumé's function is to obtain a job interview for you.  Use your common sense and imagination to highlight your background and experience in a well-focused resume.

Length

A one-page resume works well for the recent graduate.  If you have an extensive work history, two pages are reasonable.   Remember individuals with extensive work history should limit information to what is pertinent to their current job objective.  If you do go to two pages, make sure that most important information is stated on the first page.

Appearance

An organized, readable layout determines whether a resume is read.  Direct the reader's eye with the format.  Make sure it is well organized and concise.  Avoid dense text appearance that is difficult to read.

Consider using high-quality white or off-white paper.

Always type or word process your resume and have it professionally copied.

Make sure there are no typographical, spelling, or grammatical errors.

Information that has been crossed out or handwritten is unacceptable.

Make sure your resume will copy well.  Do a photocopy test.

Content

Design your resume with a particular objective in mind.  Present information important to the objective first.  Edit.

List information in descending order of importance.

Be selective about what you include in your resume, but never falsify or exaggerate information.

Sell yourself-attract attention to your special abilities.

Concentrate on the positive and use action verbs to describe your background.

Resume Inventory

The following categories are usually found in a resume.  These are suggestions.  You should adopt those that best fit your needs.

Necessary Categories

Personal Data

Make sure your name is the most obvious piece of information on your resume.  Also include address and phone number, with ZIP and area codes.  List a message phone number if you do not have an answering machine, and give an e-mail address if you have one.  It is unnecessary to include personal information such as age, marital status, or health.

Objective

An objective gives your resume a focus.   It also gives credibility and direction to your resume and suggests commitment on your part.  It should be specific enough to tell the employer the kind of work you seek, yet general enough to include the full range of jobs you will consider.  This will take some thought.  If the statement  is so specific that it would eliminate you from consideration for other jobs in which you have interest, you might consider having a resume for each type of job (not necessarily each job).  Some disciplines require objectives; others discourage their use.

Education

List your educational background in reverse chronological order starting with your highest degree and working your way backwards.   Do not go back to your high school degree.  Listing your grade point average (GPA) is optional.  Dissertation and thesis topics are also included in this section as are honors bestowed at graduation time.

Experience

This category includes volunteer or intern experiences as well as employment.  Include job titles, employers, responsibilities and dates.  Remember to list the city and state of your place of work.   Concentrate on the positive and use action works.  A statement of the percentage of college expenses earned can be included if you were self-supporting or nearly so.  You may include paid work experience, academic assignments of significant proportion, and extracurricular assignments relative to your desired field of employment, etc.  If your experience has not been relevant to your field of desired employment, you should still include a description of your responsibilities.  Strive to show growth or contributions you made while in each assignment.

Additional Information

Skills, activities, honors, awards, membership or committees, or in honorary societies, public service, or even language ability can be placed under this, or a more specific category.

References

It is acceptable to use the phrase, "Available upon request."  Be prepared with a typed list when requested.   Generally a reference sheet will consist of the name, title, business mailing address, and phone number of three to five academic or business references.  Do not use relatives, friends, or other students as references.  Be sure to obtain permission from each person you plan to list.

Additional Categories

Qualifications or Technical Skills Statement

Qualifications or skills may be established from any prior employment, educational achievement, internship, volunteer experience, hobby, or community service.  For your qualifications statement, list your past in terms of skills you have acquired that are relevant to your résumé's objective.  This section is particularly helpful to those who are making a career change or for students whose major is not obviously related to the job objective.

Language Ability

You can list this section separately as part of the qualifications statement, or in the additional information section if there is a likelihood that this ability will be used by employers.  Specify the language(s) you read, write, and/or speak and your facility in each.

Military

In the functional resume your military experience can be included in the "Experience" category.  A chronological resume would list military either under a separate heading or in chronological order under "Experience."

Publications

List articles you have published and those which have been accepted for publication.

Research

Give the employer insight into your professional abilities and training by listing the past and present research projects in your field in which you have participated.

Extracurricular Activities

Employers often look to extracurricular activities to indicate how you developed your interests and leadership abilities during college.  The extracurricular activities you list should include organizations in which you have membership and offices you have held.  You may also wish to include awards, honors, hobbies, and interests in this category.  Avoid listing controversial activities particularly those that are political or religious in nature.

Action Word List

 Examples of Action Words That Describe Your Functional Skills     

Abstracted

Achieved

Acquired

Acted

Adapted

Addressed

Administered

Advertised

Advised

Advocated

Aided

Allocated

Analyzed

Answered

Anticipated

Applied

Appraised

Approved

Arranged

Ascertained

Assembled

Assessed

Assisted

Attained

Audited

Augmented

Authored

Bolstered

Briefed

Brought

Budgeted

Built

Calculated

Cared

Charged

Chartered

Checked

Clarified

Classified

Coached

Collaborated

Collected

Comforted

Communicated

Compared

Completed

Compiled

Composed

Computed

Conceived

Conducted

Conserved

Consulted

Contracted

Contributed

Converted

Cooperated

Coordinated

Copied

Correlated

Counseled

Created

Cultivated

Debated

Decided

Dealt

Delegated

Delivered

Designed

Detected

Determined

Developed

Devised

Diagnosed

Directed

Discovered

Discriminated

Dispatched

Displayed

Dissected

Documented

Drafted

Drove

Edited

Eliminated

Empathized

Enabled

Enforced

Enlightened

Enlisted

Ensured

Established

Estimated

Evaluated

Examined

Exceeded

Excelled

Expanded

Expedited

Experimented

Explained

Explored

Expressed

Extracted

Facilitated

Fashioned

Financed

Fixed

Followed

Formulated

Fostered

Founded

Gained

Gathered

Gave

Generated

Governed

Guided

Handled

Headed

Helped

Identified

Illustrated

Imagined

Implemented

Improved

Improvised

Inaugurated

Increased

Indexed

Indicated

Influenced

Initiated

Inspected

Instituted

Integrated

Interpreted

Interviewed

Introduced

Invented

Inventoried

Investigated

Judged

Kept

Launched

Learned

Lectured

Led

Lifted

Listened

Located

Logged

Made

Maintained

Managed

Manipulated

Mapped

Mastered

Maximized

Mediated

Memorized

Mentored

Met

Minimized

Modeled

Modified

Monitored

Narrated

Negotiated

Observed

Obtained

Offered

Operated

Ordered

Organized

Originated

Overcame

Oversaw

Participated

Perceived

Perfected

Performed

Persuaded

Planned

Practiced

Predicted

Prepared

Presented

Prioritized

Produced

Programmed

Projected

Promoted

Proposed

 

Protected

Proved

Provided

Publicized

Published

Purchased

Queried

Questioned

Raised

Ran

Ranked

Rationalized

Read

Reasoned

Recorded

Received

Reduced

Referred

Related

Relied

Reported

Researched

Responded

Restored

Revamped

Reviewed

Scanned

Scheduled

Schemed

Screened

Set goals

Shaped

Skilled

Solicited

Solved

Specialized

Spoke

Stimulated

Strategized

Streamlined

Strengthened

Stressed

Studied

Substantiated

Succeeded

Summarized

Synthesized

Supervised

Supported

Surveyed

Sustained

Symbolized

Tabulated

Talked

Taught

Theorized

Trained

Translated

Upgraded

Utilized

Validated

Verified

Visualized

Won

Wrote


Examples of Adaptive Skill Words That Describe Your Personal Traits 

Active

Adaptable

Adaptive

Adept

Aggressive

Analytical

Assertive

Broad-Minded

Committed

Competent

Conscientious

Cooperative

Creative

Dedicated

Dependable

Determined

Diligent

Diplomatic

Disciplined

Discreet

Effective

Efficient

Energetic

Enterprising

Enthusiastic

Exceptional

Experienced

Fair

Familiar

Firm

Forceful

Honest

Independent

Innovative

Instrumental

Keen

Logical

Loyal

Mature

Methodical

Objective

Open Minded

Outgoing

Personable

Pleasant

Poised

Positive

Practical

Productive

Receptive

Reliable

Resilient

Resourceful

Self-confident

Self-motivated

Self-reliant

Sensitive

Sharp

Sincere

Strong

Successful

Tactful

Tenacious

Well-organized

The Web may give you access to job leads, but your success will hinge upon your ability to close the sale during the interview.

If the cyberspace boom has not yet compelled you to log on to the Internet, it should at least have grabbed your attention. If you are looking for a job, the Internet is an information superhighway system that gives you access to an ever-growing number of career, employment, and company sites with just a few mouse clicks.

At the Starting Line

Navigating the information highway is much like driving a paved one. Though you will encounter rush-hour bottlenecks, it's all about how you maneuver the I-way. First, you will need a computer, a modem, a communications program, access to a phone line, and an account with an Internet service provider. These are likely supplied for you (at no cost) on campus, at computer labs, and in residence halls.

Today, the most popular way to access the Internet is the World Wide Web (WWW). By using browser software such as Netscape, Mosaic, or NetCruiser, you can travel to countless home pages on the Web. These pages then can link you quickly to various locations with related data. You also can secure a little corner of cyberspace for yourself by creating a personal home page where you can invite visitors- including prospective employers- to get a peek at your career objectives, talents and qualifications.

The quickest way to get to a Web site on the Net is to type in its "address," or Uniform Resource Locator (URL). But even if you don't know the address of your destination, you can get started by using a search engine. These are directories for the Internet that allow users to type in the subject or keywords in which they are interested. It then scans existing Web sites for a match. A popular choice is Yahoo! <http: www.yahoo.com>.

Usenet Groups

Usenet groups, also known as newsgroups or discussion forums, are devoted to a vast array of focused topics, including some on career and job search issues. Usenet group discussions tend to be more well-thought-out than those on chat lines and have standard behaviors-netiquette-that dictate communication. So, before you send a message or respond to a posting, spend some time reading a posting entered by other users.

Usenet groups can be a valuable forum to make connections with people, keep up on industry trends, access job listings, and post resumes. To read or post to newsgroups you will need news reader software. If you want to participate in job hunt discussions, check out misc.jobs.misc.

View the Net From the Employer's Perspective

Employers from corporate America to government agencies are increasingly turning   to the Net. They are hunting actively for talent through employment bulletin boards, commercial resume data banks, and their own corporate home pages. A recruiter from Tandem Computers in Cupertino, Calif., says enthusiastically: "I love the Web. It gave me the solution I had been looking for - a fast and cost-effective way to direct computer-literate candidates to a database. We went live on the Web with our home page in 1994. We post job openings, college recruiting dates, and other employment-related information; but most importantly, we give our home page visitors an intimate look at Tandem."

Preparing Your Electronic Resume

You may choose to send your resume via e-mail or post it on databases located on commercial online services, bulletin boards, newsgroups, or mailing lists. Remember that the Internet is predominately a text-based (not voice/ video-based) tool. The first impressions you make during your job search are always the strongest, so it's critical that the application letter and resume you send via email immediately set the right tone with the reader.

Figuring out how to get discovered and stand out on employers' computer monitors is actually quite simple. The answer is, keywords! Today's Internet search programs leverage keywords. Pay attention to the job descriptions, skills, and talents the employer is seeking. Use these keywords in your application and resume so that they naturally fit the keyword searches a hiring manager would use when scanning the resume databases.

One successful Internet job seeker offers this advice: When applying for jobs on-line, don't send your resume as an attachment to an e-mail message. Create it in ASCII [plain text] and make sure it is clear and easy to read. Since plain text does not allow you to do much with formatting and layout, it is doubly important to present your experience in a cohesive, orderly manner . I tried to leave the format as naked as possible, brought my most relevant information to the top of my resume, and used clear, vibrant language."

Close the Sale the Old-Fashioned Way

Placing your electronic resume on-line is one thing, but getting a job is quite another. The Web may give you access to job leads, but your success will hinge upon your ability to close the sale during the interview. Since organizations put so much information on their Web sites, you can conduct your research in a fraction of the time you would use through traditional means. So there's really no excuse for not being prepared for your interviews. Be sure to give as much consideration to interviews which you have obtained through on-line job searches as you would to those received through more traditional means. And finally, follow up with a thank you e-mail.

Tips For Writing Cover Letters

  • Write to a specific person, using his or her name and title. Never send a cover letter addressed "Dear Sir or Madame" or 'To whom it may concern." Usually you can get a specific name by calling the organization or looking in a business directory. If possible, address your letter to the "decision maker" (the person for whom you would be working), not the Human Resources Department.
  • Demonstrate you know something about the organization.
  • Target your skills and experiences. Present any relevant background that may be of interest to the person you are writing. The "selling" paragraph highlights specific results achieved by you in those areas known to be important to successful job performance.
  • When appropriate, use the specific vocabulary of the industry. Every field has its own terminology (however, avoid over-use).
  • Avoid frequent use of personal pronouns such as "I," "me," "my," and "mine"; especially at the beginning of paragraphs.
  • Define your next step. Don't close your letter without clearly defining what you'll do next.
  • Express your appreciation. Include a statement expressing your appreciation for the employer's consideration of your employment candidacy.
  • Edit. Cross out all unnecessary words. Proofread your typed letter and have someone else proofread it.
  • Keep a copy for your file. After the application deadline passes, you will want to contact the employer about the status of your application.

 

STANDARD COVER LETTER OUTLINE

                                                       Name

                                                      Address

                                                      City, State ZIP Code

                                                      Month/Day/Year

Name

Title

Company

Street Address

City, State ZIP Code

Dear Mr./Ms. _________:

   1st paragraph (Purpose)--State why you are writing and the type of position or field of work in which you are interested. Indicate how you learned of this position. If there is not a specific position available, indicate how your interest originated. Demonstrate briefly your knowledge of the specific company.

   2nd paragraph (Background and Qualifications)--Refer the employer to an enclosed resume and/or application form. If you have had related experience or specialized training, elaborate on the details that would be of special interest to the employer. Be as specific as you can about your qualifications. Explain to your reader where and how you developed these qualifications. Your goal here is to match your skills to the employer's needs; explain how you would fit into the position and the organization.

   3rd paragraph (Request for action)--Close your letter by making a specific request for an interview and/or information. If you are requesting information, include a self-addressed, stamped envelope. If you are requesting an interview, state that you will call to arrange a time that would be convenient to discuss employment opportunities. Finally, include a statement expressing your appreciation for the employer's consideration.

Sincerely,

(Signature)

Name

 

Dress for Success

"What am I going to wear?" We get asked this question nearly every day during the recruiting season. basically, it's common sense. You can start by asking yourself three questions.

1.What do I already have to wear? For some of you this may be a happy discovery. You have been in jeans and t-shirts all semester and haven't ventured beyond your laundry basket. Your closet may turn up that lost pair of suit pants or that pair of pumps you forgot you bought at the end of last season. If you already have the traditional garb--conservative suit ( does not have to be three-piece), dress shirt and tie for a man, blouse and skirt (keeping the hem no more than five inches above the knee) for a woman, and appropriate shoes --you are all set. However, not all students have a suit. For a man, it is perfectly acceptable to wear a sports coat, shirt, tie and coordinated dress pants. For a woman, a conservative dress is acceptable.

2.Can I afford to update my existing interviewing wardrobe? If you can, great--go for it! A couple of suggestions, though. Take along a friend who has some business fashion sense (especially if yours is questionable or ask a salesperson to assist you in selecting interviewing clothes. It doesn't necessarily have to drain your bank account. Employers don't expect recent grads to wear expensive clothes. It is okay to be fashionable but flashiness is a mistake. There can be a fine line between the two. If you have trouble deciding, remember that a conservative purchase is the safer one. Most students don't have the disposable income to go on a shopping spree. If that is true for you, make do with what you have: a man can wear his best shirt and tie and woman can wear her nicest shirt and blouse. Keep things in perspective; it's not the clothes that sell employees to companies but people themselves.

3.With what kind of company will I be interviewing ? If it is a Fortune 500 company, obviously you should wear a traditional suit. But maybe you will be seeing a funky, upbeat software company and you heard the recruiter showed up for interviews last year in a tie-dyed shirt, sandals, and beads. Use your own discretion but we suggest you dress the way you would if you were giving an important presentation at a company or attending a business meeting. Unless you have something to show or give the interviewer other than a resume, leave backpacks, books, boots, umbrellas, overcoats, etc., in the closet in our office. (Caution: don't leave any valuables in the office where someone might take them while you are in the interview.)

                                                 Dressing for Success

 Professional

  • Clean, manicured fingernails
  • Neat hair
  • Polished shoes
  • Natural-looking make-up
  • Long-sleeved shirts if wearing a suit
  • Clean and neatly pressed clothes that fit properly

 Unprofessional

  • Baggy stockings, saggy socks
  • Perfumes or colognes
  • Boots
  • Costume jewelry
  • Hair jewelry (if functional, it's okay)
  • For man, gold medallions, charms For woman, low necklines, high hemlines. 

 

Using Employer Literature for Successful Interviews

Simply being informed about an employer does not guarantee a successful interview unless you can effectively use the information. Information about the employer's products, financial data, opportunities, or how they impact society is only helpful if you know how to tactfully "weave" your new knowledge into the interview. This is no easy task and simply spouting facts or statistics --or prefacing a question with a lot of memorized information--is not the answer.

Most employers have literature and/or a web site describing their organization and opportunities. Major employers provide annual reports and company literature while smaller organizations publish brochures, fact sheets, and annual reports. Either way, it is important for you to secure information on an employer before you interview.

Using Information in Answering Questions

Most of the questions you will be asked will not relate directly to the information in the literature. There are ways, however, to show how your skills and background meet the employer's needs using the information you gain. Some examples:

1 . Question:

'Why do you think you might want to work for this company? "

Response:

"As I understand the job, there's plenty of opportunity to be involved in both the planning of marketing strategies and the actual selling. Besides using my communications skills and knowledge of chemicals in direct selling, I believe I'm creative when it comes to marketing.

2. Question:

"I see you're involved with the Spanish Club. What were some of the benefits from that experience?"

Response:

 "As secretary, I was responsible for organizing a display on Spanish literature for the Cultural Fair we sponsored. Most of my correspondence with publishing houses was done in Spanish and I feel this experience added a whole new business angle to my fluency. I would feel very confident communicating with your international customers.

3. Question:

"What courses did you like best?

Response:

"I enjoyed my Sociology of learning class the most. During one in a series of field trips, I observed a rural daycare center. That confirmed for me that this type of setting is where I want to begin my career.

Using Information in Asking Questions

Next, it will be your turn to ask questions of the interviewer. It is to your advantage to ask questions which require the interviewer to expand on information you have learned from the employer's literature. Following are some excerpts from employer literature, paired with questions that could be formulated from the information given.

  • After about 12-15 months from the time you began, if you've demonstrated your ability, you'll be ready for promotion to Merchandising Manager. Your increased responsibility will include a larger sales volume and a number of sales associates reporting to you."

Questions Formulated

        --"Could you talk about some methods by which trainees are evaluated?"

        -- "What kinds of communication channels are there between the trainees

             and the supervisors?"

        -- "What would you say is the major quality or accomplishment which

             distinguishes those who are promoted from those who are not?"

  • "Today's large store manager usually has gained experience in district or regional staff work"

Question Formulated

       --"In viewing some of the background that your large store managers have, regional

           staff work is mentioned. Could you describe some of the staff work responsibilities?"

  • "But that's still not the point. From the start, ABC Company has had a goal--a vision, if you will--of being the leader in communications. That's why we are into education,  publishing, and software, among other things."

Question Formulated

      --"When the company looks to the future, it appears from the brochure that education,

   publishing, and software are some key areas. What are some of the product areas now

  that might be less important in the future-that the company may be cutting back?"

Examples of Poor Questions

1. Tell me about your training program." (Too general, shows you didn't do your homework.)

2. "At what salary level would I be if I progress to Step 3 in my second year with the company?" (Shows your concern is money as opposed to responsibility.)

3. "Could you explain your fringe benefits package?" (Standard, boring question-need to be more specific and ask about various aspects.)

Criteria for Examining Employers

Asking and answering interview questions in a prepared and professional manner is the key to successful interviewing. Use the following list of EMPLOYER INFORMATION CRITERIA (Adapted from "Recruiting Literature: Is It Adequate? " ECPO) as a guideline for what you need to find out about an employer BEFORE you choose to interview.

  • Details and Functional Descriptions of Positions
  • Training Program Outline
  • Hiring Process (timing, evaluation criteria)
  • Benefits
  • Requisite Qualifications for Entry-Level Positions
  • Typical Career Paths
  • Introduction to Employer Products/ Services
  • Starting Salaries / Compensation Forms
  • Employee Review / Evaluation Process
  • Travel / Relocation Expectations
  • General Hiring Patterns
  • Regional Lifestyle / Cost of Living
  • Organizational Chart/ Structure

 

 

 

How to Fax and E-Mail a Resume to an Employer

When faxing a resume or sending it via e-mail as an attachment, your cover letter should be brief.  Revising and editing your cover letter are key to you objective: to obtain an interview.   To be successful, give time and thought to each type of cover letter and relate it specifically to each job for which you apply.  Here is a sample fax cover letter:

Fax To: Ms. Jill Smith

 Phone: 973.123.4567

 Company: ABC Industries

 Fax: 973.987.6543

 From: Your Name

 Phone: Your Phone

 Pages: 2

 Fax: Fax# You're Using

 Dear. Ms. Smith:

      In response to the job posting on NJIT's CDS On-Line.  I am enclosing my resume for your consideration for the database analyst position.

    My resume details my qualifications.   I have excellent communication and problem-solving skills, am proficient in Access and Oracle and have the ability to function well in stressful situations.  I am confident that my internship experience at XYZ Company will make me successful at ABC Industries.  Please contact me at my home number at (973) 222-2222 or via e-mail to schedule an interview.  Thank you for your consideration of my application.

It is o.k. but not necessary to mail a copy to the company. Many people mail it as an additional assurance that the resume will be reviewed.

E-Mail Cover Letters

Many on-line services are not listing only an e-mail address for the resume forwarding.  When you send your resume, a brief cover e-mail message is required.  Be sure you keep a copy of what you send for your records.  The salutation line should be formal, just like a letter, e.g., Dear Mr. or Ms. Smith:

In the body of the message, brevity is necessary.  Business e-mails must be brief, otherwise, you will not be viewed as a person familiar with workplace protocol.  Similar to a regular cover letter, you want to grab the attention and interest of the reader right away.   Therefore, by outlining your skills as they relate to the job description/requirements, you illustrate clearly that you know what the employer seeks to fill that position.

TO: abc123@HOTINDUSTRY.org

cc: yourself, if your program does not automatically do this!

 SUBJ: Application for Network Administrator

 Dear Human Resources Director:

I am pleased to attach my resume for consideration for the above position, as advertised on Monsterboard.com. on May 2, 2000.  Please review it and note my excellent qualifications for this position.  In my current position I have gained excellent communication skills and my coursework has given me the background to join your firm and be productive from day one.

I am highly motivated to enter a company such as yours which offers excellent professional growth opportunities.  Please contact me at my home number at (973) 222-2222 or via e-mail and suggest a time and date when you would like to schedule an interview.  I will confirm it promptly.  Thank you for your consideration.

Your name

<Begin resume>

insert resume copy.  Do not send resume as an attachment.  Most recruiters will not open it, for fear of viruses.

<End resume>

The notification of 'begin resume' and 'end resume' allows the reader to copy it, forward it, or feed it into a resume bank.If the company requests that your resume be sent as an attachment, then it is fine to send it in the requested format.

 

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