RPP Awards Event

NJIT Career Development  Services
To Recognize 2017 Top Employers 
 Tuesday, April 24th


We are pleased to celebrate our employer’s hiring successes and on-campus involvement.
Join us when we honor our Recruitment Partners, and learn about best practices to engage and recruit NJIT interns, co-ops, and graduates!
You will also have an opportunity to network with student leaders, faculty, and staff.
If you will attend, please respond to this link.
Thank you for your continuing partnership with NJIT.
 

NJIT Career Development Services Staff
New Jersey Institute of Technology
973.596.3227

To Report Employment

Please click on the link below to report employment or graduate school information.

NJIT Class of 2018 Follow-up Survey (August 2017, January 2018 and May 2018 Graduates) 

 

 

Career Fair Navigator ( CFN)

The Career Fair Navigator(CFN), a mobile friendly application that allows you to quickly search, locate employers at the fair based on your major(s), position type(s), and receive real time notifications and updates using your smart phone (no download is needed).  Visit njitcfn.com to start using today, and enhance your career fair experience!

www.njitcfn.com

Career Fair Navigator's Features:

  • SEARCH EMPLOYERS- view a list of all employers; also allows you to select employers by major and position type ​
     
  • PREP- register for the career fair, view a list of workshops and participating companies, how to check in at the gym on career fair day, points to keep in mind
     
  • ANNOUNCEMENTS- where changes will be posted about companies who have canceled or been added
     
  • EVENTS- view a list of career fair preparation events​
     
  • MAPS- access maps of the Gym and Tennis Center; you can create customized maps of employers you wish to visit by using the Search Employers function
     
  • HELP- use these FAQs to answer questions about how to use this new tool

 

 

 

To get maximum use from the Career Fair Navigator, we strongly encourage you to become familiar with it before the Career Fair. Practice by selecting companies, going to their web sites, and creating personal maps for yourself. After you have practiced using CFN on your own, if you still have questions, you can contact Marcelle Jackson at 973.596.3273 or jacksonm@njit.edu.

 

 

Congratulations Graduates!

Career Development Services is committed to being a resource for students at any point in their education and for alumni who are recent graduates or seasoned professionals.  Whether you connect with us one-on-one, through group activities, or take advantage of our extensive online resources, Career Development Services is your one-stop center for superior career development planning.  Please explore our website to become familiar with your options.  We are here over the summer so please stop by or contact us for an appointment.

Statistics and Actuarial Science

Statistics deals with techniques for collecting and analyzing numerical data for the purpose of solving real-life problems. Statistical techniques are widely used in the pharmaceutical industry, engineering, education, political science, medicine and many other areas. Actuarial science is concerned with the application of mathematical probability to the design of financially sound insurance and pension programs.

 

 

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Related Career Titles for Statistics and Actuarial Science

Financial Analyst

Actuary

Actuarial Analyst

Statistician

Consultant

Management Trainee

Fundraiser

Underwriter

Accountant

Banker

Stock Broker

Claims Representative

Salesperson

Research Scientist

 Account Manager

Opinion Research Specialist

Biometrician

Data Analyst

Research Engineer

Programmer

College/University Professor

High School Teacher

Technical Writer

Numerical Analyst

Project Manager

Business Development Manager

Marketing Analyst

 

 

 

 

Industries That Hire Statistics and Actuarial Science Majors

Pharmaceutical Companies

Insurance Firms

Engineering Firms

Federal Government

Local Government

Legal Services

Social Services

Hospitals

Human Resources Departments

Banking

Communication Services

Consulting Services

Financial Services (Securities, Commodity Contracts, & Other Financial Investments)

Transportation Equipment

Transportation Equipment Companies

Waste Management & Remediation Services

Utilities

Advertising Agencies

Building and Construction Companies

Colleges/Universities

Accounting, Tax Preparation, Bookkeeping, & Payroll

Computer and Electronic Products Companies

Computer Systems Design/Computer Consulting

Employment Services

Federal Government

State and Local Government

Publishing (Newspaper, Periodical, Book, & Data Base Publishers)

Real Estate

Religious, Grant writing, Civic, Professional, & Similar Organizations

Scientific Research & Development Services

Transportation Services

 

 

 

 

Web Sites for Statistics and Actuarial Science Majors

 

Actuarial Career Information

 

The Actuarial Foundation

 

The American Academy of Actuaries

 

American Statistical Association

 

 

Resources in the Career Resource Center

 

BOOKS

 

  • VGM’s Handbook of Scientific and Technical Careers
  • Job Opportunities in Health Care ’94
  • Careers In Science and Engineering
  • Job Opportunities in Business ’94
  • Career Information Center: Administration, Business, and Office
  • Career Information Center: Engineering, Science, and Technology
  • Career Information Center: Marketing and Distribution
  • Career Information Center: Transportation
  • Career Information Center: Employment Trends and Master Index
  • Green At Work
  • Job Opportunities in Business ’95
  • Job Opportunities in Engineering and Technology ’95
  • Job Opportunities in Health Care ’95
  • The Complete Guide to Occupational Exploration
  • The Princeton Review Guide To Your Career 1997
  • The O*Net Dictionary of Occupational Titles

FOLDERS

 

  • All Majors
  • Statistics and Actuarial Science

Science, Technology and Society

The Science, Technology, and Society program explores the foundations and impact of science and technology by examining the values, language, history, politics, and economics of modern technological society. Graduates find employment in such areas as government, corporate planning, public policy, urban development, technology assessment, writing and editing, and environmental planning.

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Related Career Titles for Science, Technology, and Society

Geochemist

Microbiologist

Ecologist

Park Ranger

Forester

Economist

Wildlife Manager

Watershed Manager

Range Manager

Environmental Engineer

Waste Management Engineer

Industrial Hygienist

Social Scientist

Policy Analyst

Lawyer

Military Officer

Management Trainee

College/University Professor

High School Teacher

Fundraiser

Grant Writer

Environmental Writer

Technical Writer

Consultant

Advertiser

Market Researcher

Community Relations Specialist

Urban Planner

Planning Director

Resource Manager

Environmental Planner

Transportation Planner

Researcher

Zoning Representative

 

Industries That Hire Science, Technology, and Society Majors

Parks and Outdoor Recreation

High Schools

Colleges and Universities

Environmental Education Centers

Air Quality Management Facilities

Water Quality Management

Communication Companies

Solid Waste Management Facilities

Law Offices

Real Estate

Forest Conservation Centers

Environmental Protection Agency

Military Services

Social Services

Land Conservation Facilities

 Water Conservation Facilities

Publishing Companies

Hazardous Waste Management Facilities

Recycling Centers

Urban Planning Centers

Broadcast Media

Federal Government

State and Local Government

Transportation Services

Financial Services

Wilderness Protection Services

Consulting Firms

Transportation Services

Advertising Agencies

Building and Construction Companies

 

Web Sites for Science, Technology, and Society Majors

American Planning Association

EnvironmentalCareer.com

Science, Technology, and Society Links

 

Resources in the Career Resource Center

BOOKS

  • VGM’s Handbook of Scientific and Technical Careers
  • Job Opportunities in Health Care ’94
  • Careers In Science and Engineering
  • Job Opportunities in Engineering and Technology ‘94
  • Jobs You Can Live With
  • Job Opportunities in Business ’94
  • Career Information Center: Agribusiness, Environment, and Natural Resources
  • Career Information Center: Engineering, Science, and Technology
  • Career Information Center: Public and Community Services
  • The New Complete To Environmental Careers
  • Green At Work
  • Job Opportunities in Business ’95
  • Job Opportunities in Engineering and Technology ’95
  • Job Opportunities in the Environment ’95
  • Job Opportunities in Health Care ’95
  • Environmental Jobs for Scientists
  • The Complete Guide for Occupational Exploration
  • The Princeton Review Guide to Your Career 1997
  • The O*Net Dictionary of Occupational Titles

FOLDERS

  • All Majors
  • Science, Technology, and Society

 

Transportation

Transportation functions in a very complex environment that is characterized by constant change in the technological, regulatory and legal frameworks. Transportation professionals must not only be able to meet the technological challenges of new systems, they must also be capable of fitting these systems into the social, economic, and physical environments in a manner that improves the quality of life for all. The Transportation program prepares students to be transportation planners, engineers, and managers who can plan, design, operate, and manage transportation systems capable of satisfying society’s transportation needs.

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Related Career Titles for Transportation

Civil Engineer

Highway and Bridge Design

Project Manager

Area Director

Traffic Engineer

Transportation Planner

Traffic Engineering Technician

CADD Technician

Urban Transportation Engineers

Traffic Signal Engineer

Transit Planner

Systems Analyst

Airport Engineer

Senior Planner

Airport Planner

Construction Engineer

College/University Professor

 Permit Agent

Community Planner

Air Traffic Controller

Air Quality Specialist

Salesperson

Consultant

Urban/Regional Planner

Project Engineer

Research & Development Specialist

Test Engineer

Highway Engineer

Structural Engineer

Surveying Technician

Design Engineer

High School Teacher

Management Trainee

 

Industries That Hire Transportation Majors

Aerospace Product and Parts Manufacturers

Architectural Services

Building, Developing, & General Contracting Services

Communication Services

Computer and Electronic Products Manufacturers

Computer Systems Design/Computer Consulting Services

Consulting Services

Colleges/Universities

High Schools

Electrical Equipment, Appliance, & Component Manufacturers

Engineering Services

Federal Government

State and Local Government

Scientific Research & Development Services

Urban Planning Centers

Transportation Services

Department of Transportation

Transportation Equipment Manufacturers

Utilities Services

Waste Management & Remediation Services

Airports

US Military

Train/Transit Systems

 

Web Sites for Transportation Majors

   

Careers In Transportation (DOT)

Institute of Transportation Engineers

Global Careers-Transportation

Right of Way

 

Resources in the Career Resource Center

BOOKS

  • Careers In Science and Engineering
  • The Career Connection II
  • Job Opportunities in Engineering and Technology ’94
  • Job Opportunities in Business ’94
  • Career Information Center: Transportation
  • Career Information Center: Employment Trends and Master Index
  • Job Opportunities in Business ’95
  • Job Opportunities in Engineering and Technology ’95
  • Job Opportunities in the Environment ’95
  • The Complete Guide for Occupational Exploration
  • The O*Net Guide to Occupational Titles

FOLDERS

  • All Majors
  • Transportation

Podcasts and Videos

View videos about NJIT Career Development Services

What Happens at an Interview

The interviewing process can be scary if you don't know what to expect. All interviews fit a general pattern. While each interview will differ, all will share three common characteristics: the beginning, middle, and conclusion.

The typical interview will last 30 minutes, although some may be longer. A typical structure is as follows:

  • Five minutes--small talk
  • Fifteen minutes--a mutual discussion of your background and credentials as they relate to the needs of the employer
  • Five minutes--asks you for questions
  • Five minute--conclusion of interview
  • As you can see, there is not a lot of time to state your case. The employer may try to do most of the talking. When you do respond to questions or ask your own, your statements should be concise and organized without being too brief.

It Starts Before You Even Say Hello

The typical interview starts before you even get into the inner sanctum. The recruiter begins to evaluate you the minute you are identified. You are expected to shake the recruiter's hand upon being introduced. Don't be afraid to extend your hand first. This shows assertiveness.It's a good idea to arrive at least 15 minutes early. You can use the time to relax. It gets easier later. It may mean counting to ten slowly or wiping your hands on a handkerchief to keep them dry.

How's Your Small Talk Vocabulary?

Many recruiters will begin the interview with some small talk. Topics may range from the weather to sports and will rarely focus on anything that brings out your skills. Nonetheless, you are still being evaluated.Recruiters are trained to evaluate candidates on many different points. They may be judging how well you communicate on an informal basis. This means you must do more than smile and nod.

The Recruiter Has the Floor

The main part of the interview starts when the recruiter begins discussing the organization. If the recruiter uses vague generalities about the position and you want more specific information, ask questions. Be sure you have a clear understanding of the job and the company.As the interview turns to talk about your qualifications, be prepared to deal with aspects of your background that could be construed as negative, i.e., low grade point average, no participation in outside activities, no related work experience. It is up to you to convince the recruiter that although these points appear negative, positive attributes can be found in them. A low GPA could stem from having to fully support yourself through college; you might have no related work experience, but plenty of experience that shows you to be a loyal and valued employee.Many times recruiters will ask why you chose the major you did or what your career goals are. These questions are designed to determine your goal direction. Employers seek people who have direction and motivation. This can be demonstrated by your answers to these innocent-sounding questions.

It's Your Turn to Ask Questions

When the recruiter asks, "Now do you have any questions?" it's important to have a few ready. Dr. C. Randall Powell, author of Career Planning Today, suggests some excellent strategies for dealing with this issue. He says questions should elicit positive responses from the employer. Also, the questions should bring out your interest in and knowledge of the organization. By asking intelligent, well-thought-out questions, you show the employer you are serious about the organization and need more information. It also indicates to the recruiter that you have done your homework.

The Close Counts, Too

The interview isn't over until you walk out the door. The conclusion of the interview usually lasts five minutes and is very important. During this time the recruiter is assessing your overall performance. It is important to remain enthusiastic and courteous. Often the conclusion of the interview is indicated when the recruiter stands up. However, if you feel the interview has reached its conclusion, feel free to stand up first. Shake the recruiter's hand and thank him or her for considering you. Being forthright is a quality that most employers will respect, indicating that you feel you have presented your case and the decision is now up to the employer.

Expect the Unexpected

During the interview, you may be asked some unusual questions. Don't be too surprised. Many times questions are asked simply to see how you react. For example, surprise questions could range from, "Tell me a joke" to "What time period would you like to have lived in?" These are not the kind of questions for which you can prepare in advance. Your reaction time and the response you give will be evaluated by the employer, but there's no way to anticipate questions like these. While these questions are not always used, they are intended to force you to react under some stress and pressure. The best advice is to think and give a natural response.

Evaluations Made by Recruiters

The employer will be observing and evaluating you during the interview. Erwin S. Stanton, author of Successful Personnel Recruiting and Selection, indicates some evaluations made by the employer during the interview include:

  • How mentally alert and responsive is the job candidate?
  • Is the applicant able to draw proper inferences and conclusions during the course of the interview?
  • Does the applicant demonstrate a degree of intellectual depth when communicating, or is his / her thinking shallow and lacking depth?
  • Has the candidate used good judgment and common sense regarding life planning up to this point?
  • What is applicant's capacity for problem-solving activities?
  • How well does candidate respond to stress and pressure? 

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