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Stories Tagged with "physics" from 2006

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2006
A solar outburst, which can play havoc with global positioning systems and cell phone reception, bombarded Earth on Dec. 6, 2006, with a record amount of radio noise, said solar physicist Dale Gary, who confirmed the news today. Gary is a professor and chair of the department of physics at NJIT. >>
James E. Gunn, PhD, the Eugene Higgins Professor of Astronomy at Princeton University, will discuss "Cosmology: A Fifty-Year Perspective," on Dec. 15 at 9 p.m. in the Guttenberg Information Technologies Center, Rm. 3720/3730 at NJIT. The talk will follow the Amateur Astronomers, Inc. club membership meeting at 8 p.m. >>
Reiner Volkmer, PhD will discuss the integration of the optics and mechanics and the planning of the commissioning phase of GREGOR, a new 1.5-meter solar telescope currently being assembled in Tenerife, Spain, on Dec. 8, 3:30-4:30 pm, Guttenberg Information Technologies Center Rm. 1403. Contact: Ravindra Nugghalli. >>
"Interplanetary Energetic Electron Events: Flares or Shocks?" is the topic of a seminar by Stephen Kahler, PhD, of the Air Force Research Laboratory, Hanscom AFB, Mass., on Nov. 17, 3.30-4.30 p.m., ECE Building, Rm. 202. For more information, contact: Ravindra Nuggehalli. >>
New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) will make available live color photos illustrating the rare Transit of Mercury. Big Bear Solar Observatory, Big Bear, Calif., managed and operated by NJIT, will begin capturing these images at 2 p.m. E.S.T. using its 6 inch (15 centimeter) Singer Full-Disk Telescope. The telescope will use a special filter to look at chromosphere, a layer in the solar atmosphere about a thousand miles above the sun's visible surface. >>
The public is invited to witness the rare occurrence of Mercury passing in front of the Sun as seen from Earth on Nov. 8 from about 2 p.m. until dusk (weather permitting) with the Astronomy Club of NJIT. Club advisor Carsten Denker, PhD, assistant professor in the department of physics at NJIT, will have two professional telescopes available for viewing then. >>
"Oscillations in Networks of Noisy Spiking Neurons" is the topic of a talk by Nicolas Brunel, PhD, of the CNRS-Laboratory of Neurophysics and Physiology in Paris on Oct. 3 at 4 p.m., Cullimore Lecture Hall 611. >>
Haimin Wang, PhD, a distinguished professor in the department of physics at NJIT, received at NJIT's annual awards convocation an award for outstanding teaching. >>
Dale Gary, PhD, a professor in the department of physics and the chair of that department at NJIT, received at NJIT's annual awards convocation the Harlan J. Perlis Award for Outstanding Teaching. >>
If you're still wondering why Pluto is no longer a planet, head over Friday night to the weekly meeting of the Amateur Astronomers, Inc. in Cranford. Astrophysicist Dale Gary, PhD, professor and chair of the physics department at NJIT will decode the mystery of recent events in Prague. Gary speaks at 8:30 p.m. at the William Miller Sperry Observatory at Union County College. >>
Astrophysicist Dale Gary, PhD, professor and chair of the department of physics at NJIT, returned yesterday from the International Astronomical Union's general assembly in Prague. Gary is available to discuss the ramifications of the change in Pluto's status. >>
“What I think they were talking about today were liquid explosives based on nitroglycerines,” said Daniel Watts. Watts, a professor in the department of chemistry and environmental science at NJIT, is among five NJIT scientists and specialists available through Aug. 14, 2006, to discuss on the phone or in person the science and more of the thwarted terrorist plot in London. >>
NJIT President Robert A. Altenkirch presented an award for 50 years of service to Nissim Towfik, an associate professor in the department of physics, at the annual Service/Retiree Awards Ceremony and reception on June 15 in the Campus Center Ballroom. A total of 134 employees and retirees were recognized for their years of service to the university.  >>
Sorinel Oprisan, PhD, an assistant professor in the department of physics and astronomy at the College of Charleston, will discuss "A Computational Model of Dopamine Neuron " on May 2 at 4 p.m., Cullimore Hall Room 611. >>
Amateur astronomers can learn an assortment of information ranging from what it's like to work with the Hubble telescope to the pleasures of star-gazing with high-power professional equipment at New Jersey's annual Astronomy Day on May 6 in Hackettstown. >>
NJIT is offering a summer class in astronomy and physics for high school students who love the subjects and are considering careers in the fields. During the two-day class—held June 27-28 on the NJIT campus—high school sophomores and juniors will learn about careers in physics and astronomy, do hands-on science projects and learn from prominent NJIT physicists and astronomers. >>
Less sunlight reaching the Earth's surface has not translated into cooler temperatures, according to a team of solar physicists at NJIT. The scientists have observed that the amount of light reflected by Earth has increased since 2000. “Our findings have significant implications for the study of climate change,” said Philip R. Goode, PhD, principal investigator and distinguished professor of physics at NJIT. >>