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2014 - 6 stories
2013 - 10 stories
2012 - 4 stories
2011 - 8 stories
2010 - 16 stories
2009 - 10 stories
2008 - 6 stories
2007 - 2 stories
2006 - 4 stories
2005 - 3 stories
2004 - 4 stories
2003 - 9 stories
2014
NJIT Physics Professor Alexander G. Kosovichev, director of the Big Bear Solar Observatory, was named a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) for his pioneering work and sustained contributions to helioseismology and understanding the dynamics of the Sun. >>
A substantial new grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) will enable NJIT researchers to delve more deeply into powerful, potentially destructive solar events. >>
Now deep into the scientific discovery phase of a two-year orbit, NASA's Van Allen Probes, carrying an NJIT instrument that measures the composition of the radiation belts surrounding Earth, are shedding new light on a hazardous, little-understood region of the planet's outermost atmosphere. >>
Earlier this month, NJIT formalized an agreement with Chinese partners that will advance the university's research on thin-film solar cells, an alternative energy technology with the potential to make buildings and other infrastructure substantially more energy-efficient. >>
NJIT researchers working to boost the efficiency of a potentially game-changing alternative energy technology, thin-film solar cells, have won the backing of a powerful Chinese partner eager to speed development of inexpensive power production that can be seamlessly incorporated into a range of building materials. >>
A massive solar storm erupting from a giant, tumultuous sunspot is providing what physicist Andrew Gerrard calls a “beautiful opportunity” to observe and analyze a rare and powerful burst of solar radiation and particles traveling at unusually high speed toward Earth. >>
2013
The Fall 2013 issue of NJIT Magazine is now available online. The issue's cover feature is “A Solar Sandy? Gaining New Knowledge of the Sun and Solar Storms,” which describes how NJIT  faculty and students are collaborating on research that looks far beyond Earth to gain new insights into phenomena that pose a serious threat to our technological civilization.  >>
Tagged: njit magazine
U.S. News & World Report's Best Colleges 2014 Edition has once again named NJIT to the top tier of national universities for its range of undergraduate majors and master's and doctoral degrees. This year, NJIT was ranked 150th out of the 200+ institutions earning the distinction of top national universities.  NJIT also ranked 6th in the nation for ethnic diversity. >>
Two NJIT researchers have demonstrated that using a continuum-based approach, they can explain the dynamics of liquid metal particles on a substrate of a nanoscale.  “Numerical simulation of ejected molten metal nanoparticles liquified by laser irradiation: Interplay of geometry and dewetting,” appeared in Physical Review Letters (July 16, 2013). >>
Researchers at NJIT's Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) in Big Bear, CA have obtained new and remarkably detailed photos of the Sun with the New Solar Telescope (NST).  The photographs reveal never-before-seen details of solar magnetism revealed in photospheric and chromospheric features.  >>
The American Geophysical Union (AGU) has named NJIT Distinguished Professor Philip R. Goode, of Westfield, a 2013 Fellow for his seminal contributions to solar physics and to the development of a revolutionary ground-based solar telescope facility.  >>
Construction speeds ahead as students from NJIT and Harbin Institute of Technology hurry to add finishing touches to their collaborative entry in the 2013 China Solar Decathlon Competition, sponsored by the US Department of Energy and China National Energy Agency.  Nexus House must be ready for judging by Aug. 2, 2013.  Thirteen NJIT alums and current students have been overseas since early July to finish the construction process.  The project began two years ago. >>
Antimatter has been detected in solar flares via microwave and magnetic-field data, according to a presentation by NJIT Research Professor of Physics Gregory D. Fleishman and two co-researchers at the 44th meeting of the American Astronomical Society's Solar Physics Division.  >>
From exciting architectural plans for the August 2013 Chinese Solar Decathlon to a better hospital rating system, six student research projects recently captured the imagination of judges at the 2013 NJIT Dana Knox Student Research Showcase, held last week on April 17, 2013.  Seventy-two graduate and undergraduate students participated. >>
NJIT celebrates a new phase in the growth of its solar technology effort with the rededication of a research center as the China National Building Materials Photovoltaic Materials Research Center.  Expanding its previous work on Cadmium Telluride photocells with NJIT alumni-run Apollo Solar Energy, the new program addresses broader photocell technology and implementation studies.  >>
WattLots LLC, an active member of NJIT's Enterprise Development Center, recently completed the installation of the ground breaking “Power Arbor”™ parking lot system at Runnells Specialized Hospital in Berkeley Heights.  >>
2012
NJIT and Harbin Institute of Technology (HIT) have formed Team NJHA to compete jointly in the Solar Decathlon China (SD China) competition to be held in Datong, China in August 2013.  >>
NJIT has appointed Catalin Turc, PhD, to the faculty of NJIT's College of Science and Liberal Arts in the department of mathematical sciences, an associate professor.  >>
NJIT and Tungtay (Kunshan) Vacuum Coating Engineering Inc. of Chengdu, China entered into a partnership today to advance the manufacturing technology for the production of solar panels using Cadmium Telluride and CIGS, thin film photovoltaic cells.  >>
2011
Louis Lanzerotti, distinguished research professor of physics at NJIT, has been selected as the 2011 William Bowie Medalist of the American Geophysical Union (AGU). >>
Two faculty members from NJIT's College of Architecture and Design were invited by the PCI Board of Trustees/PCI Foundation to present their design research at the 2011 Precast/Pre-stressed Concrete Institute's Annual Convention and National Bridge Conference in Salt Lake City, Utah. >>
Following a week of tumultuous sleepless nights and round-the-clock construction, Team NJ's entry in the prestigious bi-annual U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solar Decathlon 2011 has opened on the National Mall's West Potomac Park in Washington, DC.  >>
U.S. Senator Robert Menendez today joined competitors from three New Jersey universities, including NJIT, to kick off the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) 2011 Solar Decathlon on Washington's National Mall.     >>
We're topping-off ENJOY: A Generation House, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solar Decathlon 2011 entry from Team New Jersey, a collaborative effort of Rutgers, The State University (RU) of New Jersey and NJIT on July 26 at 10 a.m. on Colden and Warren Streets.  >>
Tagged: richard garber
Construction of ENJOY: A Generation House, the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2011 entry from Team New Jersey, a collaborative effort of Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey and New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), begins July 11, 2011 following a ground-breaking at NJIT. >>
Students in NJIT's College of Architecture and Design (COAD) and School of Art + Design were invited by Tishman Construction in New York City to showcase their projects today at an Earth Day Educational Fair from 11 a .m.-4 p.m. at 7 World Trade Center Plaza.  >>
NJIT Distinguished Professor Philip R. Goode and the research team at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) have reported new insights into the small-scale dynamics of the Sun's photosphere. >>
2010
The visiting delegation from Zhenjiang in Jiangsu Province, China visited NJIT on Dec. 3 and was led by Vice Mayor and General Secretary Mr. Xiao Ping Li.  He was accompanied by Mr. Qiliang Gui, Vice Secretary and Jian Lin Lu, as well as Mao Su Yan and Violet Gu of the Zhenjiang New Area Investment Promotion Center with Rongjun Ni and Weihua Cao of the Zhenjiang Economic and Technological Development Zone. >>
A delegation from Ningguo in the People's Republic of China was named a Sister City of Newark on Nov. 18, 2010 during a special visit to NJIT. Donald H. Sebastian, PhD, senior vice president for research and development, represented Newark during the later signing since city officials were unable to attend. Earlier in the day, the group toured technology laboratories at NJIT to learn more of sustainable urban living and solar energy.  >>
Dale Gary, PhD, distinguished professor in NJIT's Department of Physics, received the Excellence in Research Award on Sept. 15, 2010 at the NJIT University Convocation, an awards ceremony with a special welcoming ceremony for the freshman class. >>
A delegation from Ningguo in the People's Republic of China will visit NJIT Nov. 18, 2010 to learn more about sustainable urban living and solar energy.  The delegation would like to transform Ningguo into China's “Solar City.”  The trip follows a visit this past July from an NJIT delegation led by Donald H. Sebastian, PhD, senior vice president for research and development, in which an agreement was signed with  city officials to help them achieve their solar goals. Ningguo is located in eastern China in the province of Anhui. The city has a population of 380,000. >>
The IEEE NJ Section Electron Devices, Circuits and Systems Chapters together with NJIT will host a talk on “Advantages of Micro-inverters in AC PV Systems: Introduction to Petra Solar's SunWave Technology" on Oct. 27 at 5 p.m. in the ECE Center Room 202. The speaker will be Dr. Hussam Alatrash, co-founder of Petra Solar. You do not have to be a member of the IEEE to attend. Contact: Dr. Durga Misra at 973-596-5739 (dmisra@njit.edu) or Dr. Edip Niver at 973-596-3542. >>
A $5 million National Science Foundation (NSF) grant to upgrade and expand a set of radio frequency antennas at Owens Valley Solar Array (OVSA) has been awarded to NJIT.  >>
Why sunspots are a strong source of radio emissions and what information those emissions carry will be the focus of an invited talk by NJIT Research Professor Jeongwoo Lee tomorrow at the International Astronomical Union Symposium on the Physics of Sun and Star Spots in Ventura, CA.  The event numbers among the top gatherings in the U.S. for people studying sunspots and related phenomena.    >>
NJIT Distinguished Professor Philip R. Goode and the Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) team have achieved “first light” using a deformable mirror in what is called adaptive optics at BBSO. An image of a sunspot was published Aug. 23, 2010 on the website of Ciel et l'Espace, as the photo of the day. >>
Jeongwoo Lee, PhD, a research professor in the department of physics, will deliver an invited talk, "Sunspots at Centimeter Wavelengths" on August 22-26 at the International Astronomical Union Symposium on Physics of Sun and Star Spots in Ventura, California. >>
Philip R. Goode, PhD, distinguished professor of physics at NJIT and director of Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) in California, has received a three-year, $2.4 million National Science Foundation (NSF) grant to improve the optics at BBSO.  >>
Think NJIT when it's time to brush up on certification skills. Four non-credit courses in iPhone application development, underground storage tank regulations, online pen Source Unix certification, and Solar Panel Installations will be available from NJIT starting as early as June and throughout the summer. Each course is open to the general public and will help state residents gain skills to seek and keep jobs.  >>
Image Processing and Pattern Recognition: Fundamentals and Techniques (IEEE & Wiley Publishers, 2010), a new book by NJIT Professor Frank Y. Shih, PhD, features unique coverage of the most interesting developments and updated techniques, including image watermarking, digital steganography, document processing and classification, solar image processing and event classification.  >>
NJIT received today from Apollo Solar Energy, Inc. a three-year, $1.5 million grant to establish a solar research center. >>
A press conference, following a check signing, will be held on Tuesday, March 16, 2010, at 3:30 p.m., when NJIT receives a three-year, $1.5 million grant from Apollo Solar Energy, Inc., a public US corporation, to build a solar research center. >>
NJIT students will have the option next fall to live in a state-of-the-art, energy efficient, renewable energy building, thanks to $1.6 million in funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA). >>
2009
Distinguished Professor of Physics Philip R. Goode will discuss "The New Solar Telescope in Big Bear" at a Physics Department Seminar on Dec. 7, 12 noon-1 p.m. (11:30 a.m. tea time) in Tiernan Rm. 407. >>
NJIT researchers are at work on many scientific and technological frontiers. The National Science Foundation has recently provided support that totals nearly $4.3 million for the diverse efforts of the following investigators under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. >>
Students in a New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) architectural studio have a unique opportunity: design a group of townhouses that will actually be built by Habitat for Humanity next year. >>
Imagine beaming electric power from space as a viable solar energy option. Engineer and researcher Martin Hoffert, professor emeritus and former chair of the department of applied science at New York University, will discuss this theory further in a free lecture, open to the public, on Nov. 4, 2009 at NJIT, from 3-4:30 p.m. in the NJIT Campus Center Atrium. >>
During the next decade, solar physicists will learn more than they might have dreamed possible about the Sun, thanks to current technologies that have advanced the capacity of ground-based and space-based instruments.   All the more reason for the excitement on Oct. 3, 2009 when NJIT formally dedicates the new solar telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO), CA. >>
NJIT Professor Dale Gary, PhD, of Berkeley Heights, an expert in solar radio data, was promoted to distinguished professor.   Gary examines the conditions under which solar radio bursts from distinct solar events can disrupt cellular telephone signals. >>
NJIT's new 1.6-meter clear aperture solar telescope—the largest of its kind in the world—is now operational.  The unveiling of this remarkable instrument—said to be the pathfinder for all future, large ground-based telescopes—could not have come at a more auspicious moment for science.  This year marks the 400th anniversary of Galileo's telescope that he used to demonstrate that sunspots are indeed on the Sun.  >>
Philip R. Goode, PhD, distinguished professor of physics at NJIT, will be inducted tonight into the New Jersey High-Tech Hall of Fame. The Hall of Fame was created in 1999 to recognize the best and the brightest New Jersey has to offer by honoring the achievements of life science and high-tech research and business leaders, educators, and government officials who have demonstrated exemplary work in innovative products and therapies.  Sponsors of the event are BioNJ, HINJ, and TechAmerica. >>
Salman Naqvi, of Kearny, a junior studying electrical engineering at NJIT, was named a prestigious Goldwater Scholar earlier this week by the Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship and Excellence in Education Program.  >>
The Princeton Review today named NJIT among the nation's top 50 public undergraduate institutions for value. NJIT was included in the select listing because it has long been known for affordability nationally and in the region.  The annual tuition this year for in-state students is under $10,500. >>
2008
Somenath Mitra, PhD, professor of chemistry and environmental science at NJIT, discussed his current research on "Organic Solar Cells" and "Smart Coatings" on Engineering TV.  >>
The NJIT Board of Overseers and NJIT President Robert A. Altenkirch presented yesterday to Philip R. Goode, PhD the first NJIT Excellence in Research Prize and Medal. Goode, who has led a five-year project to build the world's most capable 1.6-meter solar telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory in Big Bear Lake, CA, is distinguished professor of physics and director of the Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research, which manages the observatory.  >>
During the next decade, solar physicists will learn more than they have dreamed possible about the Sun, thanks to current technologies that have advanced the capacity of land-based instruments. Such advancements will be the focus of a talk on March 26 by noted NJIT solar astronomer Philip R. Goode, PhD. The inaugural presentation of the NJIT Board of Overseers Excellence in Research Prize and Medal will begin at 3:30 p.m. in the Jim Wise Theatre, Kupfrian Hall. >>
During the next decade, solar physicists will learn more than they have dreamed possible about the Sun, thanks to current technologies that have advanced the capacity of land-based instruments. Such advancements will be the focus of a talk on March 26, 2008 by noted NJIT solar astronomer Philip R. Goode, PhD.  >>
The first NJIT Excellence in Research Prize and Medal will be awarded to Philip R. Goode, PhD, distinguished professor of physics by the NJIT Board of Overseers and NJIT President Robert A. Altenkirch on March 26, 2008.  >>
An electrical and computer engineering junior at NJIT was named to the second team of the 19th annual all-USA college academic program sponsored by the publication USA TODAY. Mohammad Farhan Haider Naqvi, of Kearny, received the honor based upon an application he submitted last fall listing his accomplishments to date.   >>
2007
Researchers at  NJIT have developed an inexpensive solar cell that can be painted or printed on flexible plastic sheets. “The process is simple,” said lead researcher and author Somenath Mitra, PhD, professor and acting chair of NJIT's Department of Chemistry and Environmental Science. “Someday homeowners will even be able to print sheets of these solar cells with inexpensive home-based inkjet printers.” >>
Tagged: somenath mitra
The safety of technologies and humans in space, based on weather, is of special interest to Lanzerotti, who in 2006 was the principal investigator for instruments on the new NASA Radiation Belts Storm Probes mission to investigate Earth's Van Allen radiation belts.  >>
2006
New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) will make available live color photos illustrating the rare Transit of Mercury. Big Bear Solar Observatory, Big Bear, Calif., managed and operated by NJIT, will begin capturing these images at 2 p.m. E.S.T. using its 6 inch (15 centimeter) Singer Full-Disk Telescope. The telescope will use a special filter to look at chromosphere, a layer in the solar atmosphere about a thousand miles above the sun's visible surface. >>
Astrophysicist Dale Gary, PhD, professor and chair of the department of physics at NJIT, returned yesterday from the International Astronomical Union's general assembly in Prague. Gary is available to discuss the ramifications of the change in Pluto's status. >>
Tagged: physics, dale gary
How the study of Earthshine continues to elucidate climate variables and how the use of Earthshine data may help to search for advanced life on distant planets, will be the foci of an upcoming panel discussion in Baltimore led by solar physicist Philip R. Goode, PhD, and a panel of researchers. Goode, distinguished professor at NJIT and director of Big Bear Solar Observatory, Calif., leads the talk on May 23 at 10 a.m. during the 2006 joint assembly of six geophysical societies. >>
Less sunlight reaching the Earth's surface has not translated into cooler temperatures, according to a team of solar physicists at NJIT. The scientists have observed that the amount of light reflected by Earth has increased since 2000. “Our findings have significant implications for the study of climate change,” said Philip R. Goode, PhD, principal investigator and distinguished professor of physics at NJIT. >>
2005
Bernadette Moke, a junior at NJIT, sits on the roof in the sun, reading a book and drinking in the sunlight. She is not alone in soaking up as much sun as she can on this roof-top terrace. Just beside her, in the center of the roof, lay 160 solar panels, some of which automatically follow the path of the sun. The panels provide power for the Campus Center, and save the university nearly $30,000 a year in electric bills. >>
Tagged: campus center
NJIT, the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities and New Jersey Higher Education Partnership for Sustainability will host a mixer and panel discussion today to promote the use of solar energy in the state beginning at 1:30 p.m. on the roof-top terrace of the NJIT Campus Center. At 2 p.m., Henry A. Mauermeyer, senior vice president for administration and treasurer at NJIT, will make opening remarks, after which there will be a panel discussion and reception >>
NJIT is saving money and energy while also protecting the environment. The university has installed a 50-kilowatt solar-powered system on the roof of its new Campus Center.  An array of 160 solar panels carpets the roof, converting sunlight into electrical currents. “NJIT's solar-unit is the most advanced in the state,” said Leon Baptiste (NCE '91), the engineer who installed the system. “It should be a model for other universities, and businesses, across the state." >>
Tagged: campus center
2004
A book exploring the sun and interplanetary space co-edited by NJIT Professor of Physics Dale Gary, PhD was released this past week. Solar and Space Weather Radiophysics Current Status and Future Developments, published by Springer Publishing Company, is a 400-page hard-cover text that is part of a series about astrophysics and space science. >>
Tagged: dale gary
A book exploring the sun and interplanetary space co-edited by, New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) Professor of Physics Dale Gary, PhD was released this past week.   Solar and Space Weather Radiophysics Current Status and Future Developments, published by Springer Publishing Company, is a 400-page hard-cover text which is part of a series about astrophysics and space science. Gary's co-editor is Christoph Keller, associate astronomer at the National Solar Observatory, Tucson. >>
Tagged: physics, dale gary
Scientists who monitor Earth's reflectance by measuring the moon's earthshine have observed unexpectedly large climate fluctuations during the past two decades.  By combining eight years of earthshine data with nearly twenty years of partially overlapping satellite cloud data, they have found a gradual decline in the Earth's reflectance that became sharper in the last part of the 1990's, perhaps associated with the accelerated global warming in recent years.  Surprisingly, the declining reflectance reversed completely in the past three years.  Such changes, which are not understood, seem to be a natural variability of the Earth's clouds. >>
Despite what you might have read lately in the news about earth dimming, researchers at NJIT's Big Bear Observatory in California have uncovered evidence to the contrary. Their findings, to be reported in the May 28 issue of Science, suggest that earth is brightening. The research combines observations of the ghostly glow of light reflected from earth onto the dark side of the moon, known as earthshine, with NASA cloud data from satellites. The scientists suggest that observing earthshine offers a simple method for monitoring climate change and variations in cloud cover. >>
2003
Big Bear Solar Observatory reopened Monday November 3 after a six-day shutdown cause by California's wildfires.  Mandatory evacuation mean the center's director Philip Goode had to leave his home on Big Bear Lake and return to New Jersey, where the observatory is managed by the New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) in Newark. But no harm came to observatory staff, property, or equipment. >>

MEDIA ADVISORY

October 28, 2003
A major solar flare, possibly the second largest ever recorded, erupted today at 6:30 a.m. The intensity of the flare has sent a space storm careening towards the Earth. If the storm's magnetic field is in the right direction – opposite that of the earth – it could cause problems when it reaches us Wednesday. It could knock out power grids, upset satellites and disrupt GPS signals. More benignly, if the weather is clear, people who peer into the northern sky on Wednesday night could see a shimmer of lights known as an aurora,” says NJIT physicist Dale Gary. >>

MEDIA ADVISORY

October 24, 2003
 “This storm is predicted to be a strong event, but events of this size are not too unusual,” says Dale Gary, Ph.D., professor of physics at New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT).  “We don't expect to see it cause an unusually large amount of activity on earth. We see an event of this sort happening on the average of once every 30 days or during an 11-year solar cycle, about 200 times.” >>
Up-to-the minute reports and photographs detailing magnetic fields, radiation and high-energy particles surrounding the sun will soon be available on a new website to be developed and operated by solar physicists at New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT). >>
Observe Mars under the stars with the New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) Astronomy Club, Aug. 26, and possibly Aug. 27, at 7:30 p.m., on the NJIT campus. >>
Tagged: physics, dale gary
Newark, N.J.--The "weather" in space may have just gotten a bit more predictable. Using new digital equipment, a team of NJIT researchers has gotten a better look at the surface of the sun and what happens to it both before and during solar flares. Working at NJIT's Big Bear Solar Observatory in California, a team led by physics professor Haimin Wang, Ph.D., produced a series of new images. They show for the first time that rapid changes in the magnetic fields emanating from the sun's surface are associated with flares and mass ejections of energy from the sun's corona. These eruptions are typically near areas known as "sunspots", which appear dark through telescopes because they have a lower surface temperature than that of their surrounding surface. "This is good news for the researchers of space weather, because our information will enable scientists in industry and government to better understand and predict the likelihood of flares and prepare for and mitigate adverse consequences," says Wang. Wang is scheduled to present the findings this week at the American Astronomical Society's solar physics division meeting at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD. Solar flares are violent eruptions that send electromagnetic radiation into space, ultimately causing problems on earth by disrupting the atmosphere. The flare-ups can interfere with satellite-based communications and television and radio broadcasts. That can mean disruptions in cell-phone service and flight communications. Wang and colleagues produced images showing how the sun's surface changed during an after a flare. The research should enable scientists to predict when solar flares will erupt, how disruptive they will be, and how long they will last, he says. Crucial to producing the images was a new imaging system known as a "digital magnetograph system" built by NJIT doctoral student Tom Spirock. The team's work was also supported by grants from NASA, the National Science Foundation, and the Office of Naval Research. >>
A solar research team from New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) has discovered new information about the sun's surface, known as the photosphere. Haimin Wang, Ph.D., professor of physics at NJIT, who led this team, detected rapid changes last July in magnetic fields on the sun's surface. Such rapid changes are associated with flares and coronal mass ejections (CME). >>
Tagged: physics
A $440,000 research grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) Early Career Development Award Program has been awarded to a professor at New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) to build the brains of a solar telescope. >>
Louis J. Lanzerotti, Ph.D., a prominent New Jersey-based physicist and member of the National Academy of Engineering and the International Academy of Astronautics, has been appointed distinguished research professor of physics at New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT). >>